Eve Higby

Eve Higby
California State University, East Bay | CSUEB · Speech Language and Hearing Sciences

Ph.D.

About

48
Publications
20,680
Reads
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121
Citations
Introduction
My research investigates bilingual language processing, adaptations of the linguistic system during foreign language acquisition, and the interplay between language processes and other cognitive processes. My current research involves the effect of second-language proficiency on lexical retrieval and inhibition mechanisms in bilinguals, the influence of L2 syntax on L1 sentence processing, and the relationship between cognitive processes, linguistic processes, and brain changes in aging.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
California State University, East Bay
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Director, Multilingualism Lab
September 2017 - August 2020
University of California, Riverside
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Project Title: Neural and cognitive changes in aging and bilingualism: Implications for language production and executive function (SBE 1715073). Mentors: Judith Kroll (UCR) and Deborah Burke (Pomona College)
July 2016 - June 2018
University of California, Riverside
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Project title: Does bilingualism protect older adults against age-related language decline? Mentors: Judith Kroll (UCR) & Deborah Burke (Pomona College)
Education
August 2011 - June 2016
CUNY Graduate Center
Field of study
  • Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences
August 2011 - February 2015
CUNY Graduate Center
Field of study
  • Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences
September 2005 - December 2007
Florida International University
Field of study
  • Spanish, Linguistics

Publications

Publications (48)
Article
Full-text available
Japanese and English use temporal cues within vowels, suggesting an audio-processing advantage for temporally-cued contrasts, while Spanish does not. Using a categorial AXB discrimination task, this study investigated how American English-speaking monolinguals and early and late Spanish-English bilinguals perceive three types of temporally-contrast...
Article
Recent bilingualism research attempts to understand whether continually controlling multiple languages provides domain-general benefits to other aspects of cognition. Yet little attention has been given to whether this extends to resistance to proactive interference (PI), which involves the filtering of irrelevant memory traces in order to focus at...
Article
This study investigated the influence of first language (L1) phoneme features and phonetic salience on discrimination of second language (L2) American English (AE) vowels. On a perceptual task, L2 adult learners of English with Spanish, Japanese or Russian as an L1 showed poorer discrimination of the spectral-only difference between /æ:/ as the odd...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined speech discrimination of English vowels /ɑ/ (as in “hot”), /ʌ/ (as in “hut”), and /æ/ (as in “hat”) by non-native English speakers, using an AXB discrimination task. Previous research shows that a person’s first language (L1) changes how speech is perceived in a second learned language (L2). Spanish and Japanese were chosen for...
Article
Full-text available
No PDF available ABSTRACT This study examined speech discrimination of English vowels /ɑ/ (as in “hot”), /ʌ/ (as in “hut”), and /æ/ (as in “hat”) by non-native English speakers, using an AXB discrimination task. Previous research shows that a person’s first language (L1) changes how speech is perceived in a second learned language (L2). Spanish and...
Article
Full-text available
While cognitive changes in aging and neurodegenerative disease have been widely studied, language changes in these populations are less well understood. Inflecting novel words in a language with complex inflectional paradigms provides a good opportunity to observe how language processes change in normal and abnormal aging. Studies of language acqui...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: To better understand and compare effects of aging and education across domains of language and cognition, we investigated whether 1) these domains show different associations with age and education, 2) these domains show similar patterns of age-related change over time, and 3) education moderates the rate of decline in these domains....
Conference Paper
This study examined speech discrimination of English vowels [ɑ] (as in “hot”), [ʌ] (as in “hut”), and [æ] (as in “hat”) by non-native English speakers, using an AXB discrimination task. Previous research has shown that a person's first language (L1) influences how speech is perceived in a second-learned language (L2). Spanish and Japanese were chos...
Article
Full-text available
Older adults are slower at recognizing visual objects than younger adults. The same is true for recognizing that a letter string is a real word. People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) demonstrate even longer responses in written word recognition than elderly controls. Despite the general tendency towards slower reco...
Article
Full-text available
When bilinguals produce words in one language, their translation equivalents in the other language are thought to be activated as well. A common assumption is that this parallel co-activation produces interference, which slows down word retrieval. The current study aimed to evaluate the assumption of lexical interference during word retrieval by te...
Article
Full-text available
Background/Study Context: Lexical retrieval abilities and executive function skills decline with age. The extent to which these processes might be interdependent remains unknown. The aim of the current study was to examine whether individual differences in three executive functions (shifting, fluency, and inhibition) predicted naming performance in...
Article
Full-text available
Reading a word activates morphologically related words in the mental lexicon. People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) often have difficulty retrieving words, though the source of this problem is not well understood. To better understand the word recognition process in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders such as...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the recognition speed of Finnish nominal base forms varies as a function of their paradigmatic complexity (stem allomorphy) or productivity status. Nikolaev et al. (2014) showed that words with greater stem allomorphy from an unproductive inflectional class are recognized faster than words wit...
Presentation
Full-text available
The current study seeks to determine if age of L2 acquisition influences the type and number of words retrieved during four verbal fluency tasks. The verbal fluency task consisted of a phonemic and semantic task in both English and Spanish. World retrieval measures used for this study were: number of correct responses, word frequency per million wo...
Poster
Full-text available
In the current study, we investigated whether language proficiency and/or language use affect the degree to which this cross-linguistic influence occurs. We predicted that frequent reading in the native language but not social media would yield lower acceptability ratings in the native language, and that high Spanish and English proficiency would...
Poster
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to determine whether the age of second-language acquisition influences the type and number of words retrieved during semantic and phonemic fluency tasks in the two languages of highly proficient bilinguals.
Poster
Full-text available
Cognitive control and word retrieval
Poster
Full-text available
Cognitive control during lexical retrieval
Chapter
Full-text available
Aging adults generally exhibit decline in language comprehension relative to younger adults; these are due to some degree to sensory and/or cognitive decline. When one acquires aphasia or dementia changes in language comprehension often become even more apparent. These disorders result in different types of comprehension impairments, such as proble...
Article
Among papers considering L2 performance, a subset take into account the length of residence (LOR) in the country where the L2 is spoken. In about half of these, LOR makes no difference for performance of at least one variable measured. Since those who reside in an L2 environment for many years tend to be older, the beneficial effects of longer LOR...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the effects of executive control and working memory on older adults' sentence-final word recognition. The question we addressed was the importance of executive functions to this process and how it is modulated by the predictability of the speech material. To this end, we tested 173 neurologically intact adult native English spea...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In order to obtain accurate information about participants’ language processing, researchers must employ a reliable and valid language processing test that yields consistent results (i.e., internal consistency reliability) and measures what the test is supposed to measure (i.e., construct validity). The reliability and validity of quantitative meas...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Substantial literature suggests that written sentences containing object-relative clauses are more difficult to comprehend than those with subject-relative clauses across a variety of languages (e.g., Traxler et al., 2002). Less is known about the effect of sentence structure on auditory sentence processing. Our study aimed at investigating whether...
Article
Full-text available
The adaptation of native language construal patterns in second language acquisition First language attrition occurs when a bilingual's native language shows evidence of language change due to the predominant use of a second language. Recent research in rst language attrition has shown that lexical retrieval and word choice are more vulnerable to re...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, research on multilingualism has grown and has provided researchers with new insights into the mechanisms at work in the multilingual brain. While some studies of multilinguals have shown similar results to what has been seen in studies of bilinguals, certain unique properties of multilinguals are beginning to be noticed, parti...

Projects

Projects (8)
Project
Bilinguals associate more than one word form with concepts. Do these forms interfere with each other during language production, or do they facilitate word retrieval? The current project explores these questions by looking at individual differences in vocabulary knowledge, language switching and verbal fluency tasks, and production of cognates.
Project
In this project, we compare highly proficient Spanish-English bilinguals living in New York City to Spanish and English monolinguals on semantic and letter fluency in both languages. We characterize various aspects of their productions in order to understand bilinguals' lexical organization and lexical access, including lexical frequency and cognate effects as a function of time.
Project
This project investigates how cognitive control is employed during language production and what contexts require greater control. The project also looks at how language experience, such as bilingualism, affects how cognitive control is applied during language production, and how this process changes in healthy aging.