Eve Davidian

Eve Davidian
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research · Department of Evolutionary Ecology

Dr. rer. nat.

About

14
Publications
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Introduction
I apply concepts and theories from behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology and socio-endocrinology to study the determinants and fitness consequences of individual strategies to acquire resources, mates, social allies, and power in group-living animals. I am particularly interested in the interplay between individual life history and processes at the level of the social group and population. For this, I primarily use long-term empirical data on spotted hyenas in Ngorongoro Crater (Tanzania).

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
The ultimate payoff of behaviours depends not only on their direct impact on an individual, but also on the impact on their relatives. Local relatedness—the average relatedness of an individual to their social environment—therefore has profound effects on social and life history evolution. Recent work has begun to show that local relatedness has th...
Article
Full-text available
The causes and consequences of being in a particular dominance position have been illuminated in various animal species, and new methods to assess dominance relationships and to describe the structure of dominance hierarchies have been developed in recent years. Most research has focused on same-sex relationships, however, so that intersexual domin...
Article
The rate of adaptive evolution, the contribution of selection to genetic changes that increase mean fitness, is determined by the additive genetic variance in individual relative fitness. To date, there are few robust estimates of this parameter for natural populations, and it is therefore unclear whether adaptive evolution can play a meaningful ro...
Article
In animal societies, control over resources and reproduction is often biased towards one sex. Yet, the ecological and evolutionary underpinnings of male–female power asymmetries remain poorly understood. We outline a comprehensive framework to quantify and predict the dynamics of male–female power relationships within and across mammalian species....
Article
Full-text available
Management strategies to reduce human-carnivore conflict are most effective when accepted by local communities. Previous studies have suggested that the acceptance depends on emotions toward carnivores, the cultural importance of carnivores, and livestock depredation, and that it may vary depending on the types of strategies and carnivores involved...
Article
Full-text available
1. In many animal societies, dominant males have a higher reproductive success than subordinate males. The proximate mechanisms by which social rank influences reproductive success are poorly understood. One prominent hypothesis posits that rank‐related male attributes of attractiveness and fighting ability are the main mediators of reproductive sk...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying how dominance within and between the sexes is established is pivotal to understanding sexual selection and sexual conflict. In many species, members of one sex dominate those of the other in one-on-one interactions. Whether this results from a disparity in intrinsic attributes, such as strength and aggressiveness, or in extrinsic factor...
Article
Chromosomal change is recognized as an important force in speciation-with-gene-flow models. Although Robertsonian (Rb) translocations contribute to hybrid unfitness and modify recombination patterns, they are generally not considered as efficient as inversions in reducing gene flow. The present study analyses two hybridizing chromosomal races of th...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a key driver of ecological and evolutionary processes. Despite substantial efforts to explain the evolution of dispersal, we still do not fully understand why individuals of the same sex of a species vary in their propensity to disperse. The dominant hypothesis emphasizes movements and assumes that leaving home (dispersal) and staying...
Article
Full-text available
1.Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) are widely used to quantify concentrations of hormone metabolites. Modifications in laboratory conditions may affect the accuracy of metabolite concentration measurements and lead to misinterpretations when results of different accuracy are combined for a statistical analysis. This issue is of great relevance to studies...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Investigate the interplay between social & sexual conflicts, the determinants of biases in social dominance between the sexes and the socio-ecological drivers of their variation.
Project
Investigate drivers of breeding-group choice, and impact of maternal social support and distribution of breeding partners on dispersal patterns and long-term reproductive success in a social mammal.