Evans Adjei

Evans Adjei
Umeå University | UMU · Department of Geography

PhD

About

11
Publications
1,468
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55
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
54 Citations
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Publications

Publications (11)
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Join us at the 6th Global Conference on Economic Geography. June 7-10, 2022. Dublin Ireland. Find more information about the 6th GCEG in general at URL https://gceg.org/. Please submit your abstract (500 words) by 11th February 2022. Please submit your abstract (max. 250 words) via the official GCEG submission portal by 11th February 2022 (https...
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Join us at our Special Session SMEs/Family Businesses and regions at the Regional Studies Association's conference on Regions in Recovery Second Edition 2022: Re-imagining Regions, 21st March – 1st April 2022; Submitting papers: Please submit your abstract (up to 300 words) via the conference portal (https://lounge.regionalstudies.org/Meetings/Me...
Article
To contribute to more balanced perspectives on sub-municipal population change in sparsely populated areas (SPAs), this paper closely examines a local pocket of growth in a shrinking Northern Swedish municipality. Integrating Swedish register data with in-depth qualitative insights, the geographic study examines patterns and processes of uneven loc...
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This paper constructs a theoretical framework that explains how exposure to entrepreneurial activities impacts start-ups’ survival. First, this study examines the effects of entrepreneurial capital (EC) – inherited entrepreneurial practices from parents as a result of the exposure to entrepreneurial activities, on the survival of start-ups. Second,...
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of immigration on the labour market outcomes of low-educated natives (i.e. residents without a university diploma). Using the labour market competition theory, which argues that the labour market effects of natives depend on the skill set of immigrants, the paper addresses whether immigran...
Article
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While the family may serve as a resource for entrepreneurs, it has been studied separately in different disciplines. In this paper, we combine the arguments on familial relationships (family firm literature) and skill variety (regional learning literature) to analyse how different forms of entrepreneurial family relationships (co-occurrences) facil...
Thesis
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The aim of the thesis is to analyse the effects of family co-occurrence and past familial relationships (inherited entrepreneurial abilities) on firm performance. This aim is motivated by the contemporary arguments that social relations (e.g. family ties) are important in the analysis of today’s space economy. In most studies, the point of departur...
Article
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This study empirically assesses the role of social proximity, defined as the concentration of family members (FM) in firms, on firm performance. Based on longitudinal micro-data for the period 1995–2010 connecting information on workers and their workplaces in the Swedish labour market, the effects of FM (parents, children, siblings and grandparent...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
From having been considered an essential feature of pre-modern societies, family networks still play an important role for finding and getting a job, and has even in some arenas increased in importance despite increased formalization and institutional arrangements aiming to make the recruitment process more transparent. While previous studies in Sweden and elsewhere have shown the immense role of parents for youths when entering the labor market, this project aims to advance this topic further. We do so by analysing the prevalence and impact of family relations in all Swedish workplaces. In particular, we aim to advance existing knowledge by (i) assessing the role of extended family networks (not only parents) to measure the potential kinship bias that may structure who gets a job and who does not, (ii) estimate how kinship bias may influence firm performance by also considering sector, location and other social divisions such as gender, age and ethnicity, and how this has changed over time (1960-2010), and (iii) asking informants whether they perceive kin related recruitment as successful or problematic. By combining quantitative analyses on longitudinal micro-data and interviews with firm representatives, this project will contribute with important insights on to what degree assumed transparency in a modern welfare state trickle down to its labor market and to the mechanisms structuring labor market entry and career-development for different groups of workers.