Evangelia G. Chrysikou

Evangelia G. Chrysikou
Drexel University | DU · Department of Psychology

Ph.D.

About

62
Publications
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2,148
Citations
Introduction
Evangelia G. Chrysikou is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Drexel University. Dr. Chrysikou does research in Cognitive Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Science, and Neuropsychology.
Additional affiliations
January 2009 - December 2011
University of Pennsylvania
January 2005 - December 2006
Temple University

Publications

Publications (62)
Article
Changes in brain connectivity patterns as a function of age have been recently proposed to underlie differences in cognitive abilities between young and older adults. These shifts track patterns of increased functional coupling between the executive control network (ECN)-a network of prefrontal and parietal areas that is broadly implicated in exter...
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Neuroimaging and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) research has revealed that generating novel ideas is associated with both reductions and increases in prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity, and engagement of posterior occipital cortex, among other regions. However, there is substantial variability in the robustness of these tDCS‐induced e...
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Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most common mood disorder and a primary cause of disability worldwide. MDD symptomatology entails disturbances in emotion regulation, namely one’s ability to modify the intensity and duration of emotional reactions towards affective events. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has emerged as a promis...
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Changes in cognition observed in aging (e.g. a shift from prioritization of fluid cognition in young adulthood toward an emphasis on crystalized knowledge and semantic cognition in older adulthood) are believed to reflect alterations in neural connectivity in aging. Recent work specifically highlights how increased connectivity between executive co...
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Cognitive neuroscience research has traditionally focused on understanding the brain mechanisms that enable cognition by means of experimental laboratory tasks. With a budding literature, there is growing interest in the application of the related methods and findings to real-world settings. In this opinion paper we explore the potential and promis...
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An influential model of the neural mechanisms of creative thought suggests that creativity is manifested in the joint contributions of the Default Mode Network (DMN; a set of regions in the medial PFC, lateral and medial parietal cortex, and the medial temporal lobes) and the executive networks within the dorsolateral PFC. Several empirical reports...
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Driving is a complex task that consists of several physical (motor-related) and physiological (biological changes within the body) processes occurring simultaneously. The complexity of the task depends on several factors, but this research focuses on work zone configurations and their effect on driver performance and gaze behavior. The increase in...
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Nearly everyone has the ability for creative thought. Yet, certain individuals create works that propel their fields, challenge paradigms, and advance the world. What are the neurobiological factors that might underlie such prominent creative achievement? In this study, we focus on morphometric differences in brain structure between high creative a...
Article
Background: A well-established impaired top-down network for effortful emotion regulation (ER) in major depressive disorder (MDD) includes the dorsal and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the amygdala. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive neuromodulation method that has been used successfully to induce mood change...
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Emotion regulation (ER) has been conceptualized as processes through which individuals modulate their emotions consciously and non-consciously to respond appropriately to environmental demands. Emotions can be regulated in many ways and specific strategies may have differing efficacy across situations and individuals. The importance of flexibility...
Article
Increased activity in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) may contribute to anxiety-related symptoms and has been discussed as a neurobehavioral target of anxiolytic treatments aiming to decrease avoidance behavior. Previously, we have shown that for individuals with high anxiety sensitivity excitatory right (but not left or sham) dlPFC tr...
Preprint
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The neurobiological mechanisms supporting cognitive regulation during creative thinking have been at the forefront of recent research on creative cognition. This work has revealed tradeoffs between activity in prefrontal executive control systems and posterior or subcortical brain regions, typically thought to comprise the brain's default mode netw...
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Research on specific qualities of music used for relaxation has shown conflicting results. The use of different familiar or pre-composed pieces, with many simultaneous changes, might limit the ability to discriminate which musical element is responsible for the relaxation response. To address the latter, we examined the relaxing effects of music on...
Article
Scientists have mapped the innovative mind so that we can remake our own in its image
Chapter
The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of some key background issues and recent trends in the experimental and cognitive neuroscience study of creativity. Despite its status as a hallmark of higher order thinking, research on creativity has not progressed with the same rigor as the study of other aspects of human cognition. Among the...
Chapter
At first glance, the experimental study of a topic as complex as creativity would seem like a formidable task for a cognitive neuroscientist. For one, the methods of cognitive neuroscience are best suited for cognitive processes we can clearly isolate in space and time and which can be reliably elicited with simple experimental manipulations in the...
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Creative cognition is frequently described as involving two primary processes, idea generation and idea selection. A growing body of research has used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to examine the neural mechanisms implicated in each of these processes. This literature has yielded a diverse set of findings that vary depending on the...
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A critical aspect of conceptual knowledge is the selective activation of goal-relevant aspects of meaning. Although the contributions of ventrolateral prefrontal and posterior temporal areas to semantic cognition are well established, the precise role of posterior parietal cortex in semantic control remains unknown. Here, we examined whether this r...
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An object’s perceived readiness-for-action (e.g., its size, the degree of rotation from its canonical position, the user’s viewpoint) can influence semantic knowledge retrieval. Yet, the organization of object knowledge may also be affected by body-specific sensorimotor experiences. Here, we investigated whether people’s history of performing motor...
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Approach-avoidance conflict (AAC) refers to situations associated with both rewarding and threatening outcomes. The AAC task was developed to measure AAC decision-making. Approach behavior during this task has been linked to self-reported anxiety sensitivity and has elicited anterior cingulate, insula, caudate and right dorsolateral prefrontal cort...
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The third author's name is spelled incorrectly. The correct name is: Evangelia G. Chrysikou. The correct citation is: Lepping RJ, Atchley RA, Chrysikou EG, Martin LE, Clair AA, Ingram RE, et al. (2016) Neural Processing of Emotional Musical and Nonmusical Stimuli in Depression. PLoS ONE 11(6): e0156859. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0156859. © 2016 Lepp...
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Background: Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and striatum are part of the emotional neural circuitry implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). Music is often used for emotion regulation, and pleasurable music listening activates the dopaminergic system in the brain, including the ACC. The present study uses functional MRI (fMRI) and an emotion...
Data
Demographics, summary questionnaire scores, and emotion ratings by participant. Key: study_id = unique subject identifier; male (1 = male, 0 = female); age (years), ed = education in years; mus_train (1 = None, 2 = 1–3 years, 3 = 4–6 years, 4 = 7–10 years, 5 = more than 10 years); MDD = Major Depressive Disorder classification (1 = MDD group, 0 = N...
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Pictorial examples during creative thinking tasks can lead participants to fixate on these examples and reproduce their elements even when yielding suboptimal creative products. Semantic memory research may illuminate the cognitive processes underlying this effect. Here, we examined whether pictures and words differentially influence access to sema...
Chapter
The aim of the present paper is to discuss recent evidence from cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience that bear on the cognitive and neural processes underlying creative production. The paper will review factors that may obstruct idea generation in creative design and will discuss instructional approaches with the potential to support the...
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One aspect of higher order social cognition is empathy, a psychological construct comprising a cognitive (recognizing emotions) and an affective (responding to emotions) component. The complex nature of empathy complicates the accurate measurement of these components. The most widely used measure of empathy is the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IR...
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Abstract Nachev and Hacker's conceptual analysis of the neural antecedents of voluntary action underscores the real danger of ignoring the meta-theoretical apparatus of cognitive neuroscience research. In this response, we temper certain claims (e.g., whether or not certain research questions are incoherent), consider a more extreme consequence of...
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The empirical link between psychopathology and creativity is often correlational and fraught with suspiciously causal interpretations. In this paper, we review research in favor of the position that certain forms of psychopathology that profoundly affect the neural substrates for rule-based thought (e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) can signif...
Article
Scientists have mapped the innovative mind so that we can remake our own in its image
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Full-text available
Recent neuroscience evidence suggests that some higher-order tasks might benefit from a reduction in sensory filtering associated with low levels of cognitive control. Guided by neuroimaging findings, we hypothesized that cathodal (inhibitory) transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) will facilitate performance in a flexible use generation ta...
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How do people represent object meaning? It is now uncontentious that thinking about manipulable objects (e.g., pencils) activates brain regions underlying action. But is this activation part of the meaning of these objects, or is it merely incidental? The research we report here shows that when the hands are engaged in a task involving motions that...
Article
Scientists have mapped the innovative mind so that we can remake our own in its image
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Full-text available
Word learning is a lifelong activity constrained by cognitive biases that people possess at particular points of development. Age of acquisition (AoA) is a psycholinguistic variable that may prove useful toward gauging the relative weighting of different phonological, semantic, and morphological factors at different phases of language acquisition a...
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Aphasia is a common consequence of unilateral stroke, typically involving perisylvian regions of the left hemisphere. The course of recovery from aphasia after stroke is variable, and relies on the emergence of neuroplastic changes in language networks. Recent evidence suggests that rehabilitation interventions may facilitate these changes. Functio...
Article
Cognitive control refers to the regulation of mental activity to support flexible cognition across different domains. Cragg and Nation (2010) propose that the development of cognitive control in children parallels the development of language abilities, particularly inner speech. We suggest that children’s late development of cognitive control also...
Article
Studies of conceptual processing have revealed that the prefrontal cortex is implicated in close-ended, deliberate memory retrieval, especially the left ventrolateral prefrontal regions. However, much of human thought-particularly that which is characterized as creative-requires more open-ended, spontaneous memory retrieval. To explore the neural s...
Article
One of the most frequent symptoms of unilateral stroke is aphasia, the impairment or loss of language functions. Over the past few years, behavioral and neuroimaging studies have shown that rehabilitation interventions can promote neuroplastic changes in aphasic patients that may be associated with the improvement of language functions. Following l...
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Right- and left-handers implicitly associate positive ideas like "goodness" and "honesty" more strongly with their dominant side of space, the side on which they can act more fluently, and negative ideas more strongly with their nondominant side. Here we show that right-handers' tendency to associate "good" with "right" and "bad" with "left" can be...
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Semantic dementia (SD) is characterized by a dramatic loss of conceptual knowledge about the meaning of words and the identity of objects. Previous research has suggested that SD patients' knowledge is differentially influenced by the disease and may decline at different degrees depending on a patient's everyday familiarity with certain items. Howe...
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People with different types of bodies tend to think differently in predictable ways, even about abstract ideas that seem far removed from bodily experience. Right- and left-handers implicitly associate positive ideas like goodness and honesty more strongly with their dominant side of space, the side on which they can interact with their environment...
Article
Abstract The proposed theory can account for analogies based on learned relationships between elements in the source and target domains. However, its explanatory power regarding the discovery of new relationships during analogical reasoning is limited. We offer an alternative perspective for the role of PFC in analogical thought that may better add...
Article
Semantic short-term memory (STM) deficits have been traditionally defined as an inability to maintain semantic representations over a delay (Martin et al., 1994b). Yet some patients with semantic STM deficits make numerous intrusions of items from previously presented lists, thus presenting an interesting paradox: why should an inability to maintai...
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The prefrontal cortex is crucial for the ability to regulate thought and control behavior. The development of the human cerebral cortex is characterized by an extended period of maturation during which young children exhibit marked deficits in cognitive control. We contend that prolonged prefrontal immaturity is, on balance, advantageous and that t...
Article
Age of acquisition (AoA) is a psycholinguistic construct that refers to the chronological age at which a given word is acquired. Contemporary theories of AoA have focused on lexical acquisition with respect to either the developing phonological or semantic systems. One way of testing the relative dominance of phonological or semantic contributions...
Article
Reports of semantic dementia patients have shown more accurate identification and use for personal objects than unfamiliar analogs of the same objects (e.g., personal comb versus experimenter's comb) [Bozeat, S., Lambon Ralph, M. A., Patterson, K., & Hodges, J. R. (2002). The influence of personal familiarity and context on object use in semantic d...
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Problem-solving theories have not examined how solvers navigate their knowledge to interpret problem situations or to plan strategies toward goals. In this article, the author argues that success in problem solving depends on the solver's ability to construct goal-derived categories, namely categories that are formed ad hoc to serve goals during th...
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Two experiments examined possible negative transfer in nonexperts from the use of pictorial examples in a laboratory design problem-solving situation. In Experiment 1, 89 participants were instructed to "think aloud" and were assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: (a) control (standard instructions), (b) fixation (inclusion of a problematic example, descri...
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Comment on "Realism, Instrumentalism, and Scientific Symbiosis: Psychological Theory as a Search for Truth and the Discovery of Solutions" by John T. Cacioppo, Gun R. Semin and Gary G. Berntson (see record 2004-14303-001). The appeal for the unification of psychology is in fashion and Cacioppo et al.'s term "symbiosis" connotes a cooperative and co...
Article
Previous research has shown that people represent the abstract concept of time by constructing metaphoric mappings from the more concrete domain of space. Earlier studies have revealed that different spatial metaphorical mapping systems are employed when people think about time (e.g., front/back, ego-moving/time-moving). However, it is possible tha...
Article
Abstract The present research aimed to investigate the putative advantage of personal familiarity for object naming and use in individuals with Alzheimer's Dementia (AD). Eleven (n = 11) patients with probable AD diagnosis participated. Prior to testing, the participant's caregiver was asked to identify and bring to the laboratory 15 portable house...

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Projects (2)
Project
The Society for the Neuroscience of Creativity (https://www.tsfnc.org/) is working with NeuroImage on a special issue on the neuroscience of creativity. Submissions will soon be invited to this special issue ! The issue will consider work that is relevant to the neuroscience of creativity, with a particular focus on empirical research employing one or more neuroimaging techniques. Submission opens: January 15, 2019 Submission deadline: June 1, 2019 Acceptance deadline: October 1, 2019 Guest editors: Manish Saggar; Evangelia Chrysikou; Adam Green; Emmanuelle Volle; Lucina Uddin Link for submissions: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/neuroimage/call-for-papers/neuroscience-of-creativity-in-neuroimage
Project
SfNC welcomes research on creative thinking, using tools ranging from behavioral measures to neuroimaging and other neuroscientific methods. For information about the society, its previous meetings, or to become a member, go to https://www.tsfnc.org.