Eva Van Assche

Eva Van Assche
Thomas More University of Applied Sciences · Department of Applied Psychology

PhD

About

36
Publications
17,147
Reads
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1,890
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
1140 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Additional affiliations
October 2005 - present
Ghent University

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Background There is a great evidence base today for the effectiveness of e-mental health, or the use of technology in mental healthcare. However, large-scale implementation in mental healthcare organisations is lacking, especially in inpatient specialized mental healthcare settings. Aim The current study aimed to gain insights into the factors tha...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction While online consultations have shown promise to be a means for the effective delivery of high-quality mental healthcare and the first implementations of these digital therapeutic contacts go back nearly two decades, uptake has remained limited over the years. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic dramatically altered this relative stands...
Article
Cognates - words that share form and meaning between languages - are processed faster than control words. However, is this facilitation effect merely lexical in nature or does it cascade to phonological/orthographic (i.e., sub-lexical) processes? This study compared cognate effects in spoken and typewritten production, which share lexical, but not...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Research increasingly shows how selective and targeted use of technology within care and welfare can have several advantages including improved quality of care and active user involvement. Purpose: The current overview of reviews aims to summarize the research on the effectiveness of technology for mental health and wellbeing. The goal...
Article
Full-text available
E-mental health (eMH) encompasses the use of digital technologies to deliver, support, or enhance mental health services. Despite the growing evidence for the effectiveness of eMH interventions, the process of implementation of eMH solutions in healthcare remains slow throughout Europe. To address this issue, the e-Mental Health Innovation and Tran...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction While the general uptake of e-mental health interventions remained low over the past years, physical distancing and lockdown measures relating to the COVID-19 pandemic created a need and demand for online consultations in only a matter of weeks. Objective This study investigates the uptake of online consultations provided by mental he...
Article
E-mental health, or the use of technology in mental healthcare, has been the focus of research for over two decades. Over that period, the evidence-base for the potential of technology to improve psychotherapeutic practice has grown steadily. This sharply contrasts with the actual use of e-mental health by psychotherapists, which has remained limit...
Preprint
Full-text available
BACKGROUND While the general uptake of e-mental health interventions remained low over the past years, physical distancing and quarantine measures relating to the COVID-19 pandemic created a need and demand for online consultations and telepsychology in only a matter of weeks. OBJECTIVE This study investigates the uptake of online consultations pr...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought with it a great need for the use of telepsychotherapy and other interventions using psychological theories and techniques to support both mental and physical health. E-mental health presents a wide range of opportunities in mental healthcare to overcome barriers for receiving conventional psychological care, especi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Even though eMH solutions have an important potential to reduce waiting lists and costs for mental health care, Belgium only shows initial levels of awareness of eMH products and services in various stakeholder groups. eMH-related initiatives and projects are evolving with support from federal and regional government, and higher education is starti...
Chapter
Full-text available
Bilingual Lexical Ambiguity Resolution - edited by Roberto R. Heredia January 2020
Article
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - Cognition - Bilingual Lexical Ambiguity Resolution - edited by Roberto R. Heredia
Preprint
Cognates – words that share form and meaning between languages – are processed faster than control words. However, it is unclear whether this effect is merely lexical (i.e., central) in nature, or whether it cascades to phonological/orthographic (i.e., peripheral) processes. This study compared the cognate effect in spoken and typewritten productio...
Article
In de ggz wordt steeds sterker ingezet op online interventies, vaak als aanvulling op de klassieke face-to-face-therapie. Hoe sterk is de evidentie dat blended therapie ook echt tot betere zorg leidt, en hoe krijgt blended therapie vorm in de praktijk?
Article
Full-text available
We monitored the progress of 40 children when they first started to acquire a second language (L2) implicitly through immersion. Employing a longitudinal design, we tested them before they had any notions of an L2 (Time 0) and after 1 school year of L2 exposure (Time 1) to determine whether cognitive abilities can predict the success of L2 learning...
Article
In dialogue, speakers tend to adapt their speech to the speech of their interlocutor. Adapting speech production to preceding speech input may be particularly relevant for second language (L2) speakers interacting with native (L1) speakers, as adaptation may facilitate L2 learning. Here we asked whether Dutch-English bilinguals adapt pronunciation...
Article
Full-text available
Reading affords opportunities for L2 vocabulary acquisition. Empirical research into the pace and trajectory of this acquisition has both theoretical and applied value. Charting the development of different aspects of word knowledge can verify and inform theoretical frameworks of word learning and reading comprehension. It can also inform practical...
Article
The present study examined the extent to which word production and recognition rely on shared representations in lexical access by examining cross-modality transfer effects and frequency effects in a training paradigm. Participants were trained in reading high- and low-frequency words in a lexical decision task and were subsequently tested in produ...
Article
This study examined how noun reading by bilinguals is influenced by orthographic similarity with their translation equivalents in another language. Eye movements of Dutch–English bilinguals reading an entire novel in L1 and L2 were analyzed. In L2, we found a facilitatory effect of orthographic overlap. Additional facilitation for identical cognate...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of bilingualism research on visual word recognition in sentence context and relates this work to task-specific context factors. Many studies examining bilingual word recognition out-of-context have shown that words from both languages become activated when reading in one language (i.e., language-nonselective lexica...
Article
Full-text available
Bilinguals have two languages that are activated in parallel. During speech production, one of these languages must be selected on the basis of some cue. The present study investigated whether the face of an interlocutor can serve as such a cue. Spanish-Catalan and Dutch-French bilinguals were first familiarized with certain faces, each of which wa...
Article
Full-text available
The present cross-sectional study investigated the development of phonological recoding in beginning readers of Dutch, using a proofreading task with pseudohomophones and control misspellings. In Experiment 1, children in grades 1 to 3 rejected fewer pseudohomophones (e.g., wein, sounding like wijn 'wine') as spelling errors than control misspellin...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies on bilingual language processing have shown that lexical access is not selective with respect to language. These studies typically used nouns as word stimuli. The aim of the present study was to extend the previous fi ndings on noun processing to verb processing. In the fi rst experiment, Dutch-English bilinguals performed a lexical de...
Article
Full-text available
The current study investigated the scope of bilingual language control differentiating between whole-language control involving control of an entire lexicon specific to 1 language and lexical-level control involving only a restricted set of recently activated lexical representations. To this end, we tested 60 Dutch-English (Experiment 1) and 64 Chi...
Article
Full-text available
The experiments described in this article combine response time measurements and eye movement data to gain insight into the users' cognitive processes while working with dynamic and interactive maps. Experts and novices participated in a user study with a 'between user' design. Twenty screen maps were presented in a random order to each participant...
Article
Full-text available
This paper focuses on improving the efficiency and effectiveness of dynamic and interactive maps in relation to the user. A label placement method with an improved algorithmic efficiency is presented. Since this algorithm has an influence on the actual placement of the name labels on the map, it is tested if this efficient algorithms also creates m...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides an overview of bilingualism research on visual word recognition in isolation and in sentence context. Many studies investigating the processing of words out-of-context have shown that lexical representations from both languages are activated when reading in one language (language-non-selective lexical access). A newly develope...
Article
Full-text available
To contrast mechanisms of lexical access in production versus comprehension we compared the effects of word frequency (high, low), context (none, low constraint, high constraint), and level of English proficiency (monolingual, Spanish-English bilingual, Dutch-English bilingual) on picture naming, lexical decision, and eye fixation times. Semantic c...
Article
The present study investigates how semantic constraint of a sentence context modulates language-non-selective activation in bilingual visual word recognition. We recorded Dutch–English bilinguals’ eye movements while they read cognates and controls in low and high semantically constraining sentences in their second language. Early and late eye-move...
Article
Becoming a bilingual can change a person’s cognitive functioning and language processing in a number of ways. This study focused on how knowledge of a second language (L2) influences native-language (L1) sentence reading. We used the cognate facilitation effect as a marker of cross-lingual activations in both languages. Cognates (e.g., Dutch-Englis...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research on bilingualism has shown that lexical access in visual word recognition by bilinguals is not selective with respect to language. In the present study, the authors investigated language-independent lexical access in bilinguals reading sentences, which constitutes a strong unilingual linguistic context. In the first experiment, Dutch...
Article
Full-text available
Six experiments apply the masked priming paradigm to investigate how letter position information is computed during printed word perception. Primes formed by a subset of the target's letters facilitated target recognition as long as the relative position of letters was respected across prime and target (e.g., "arict" vs. "acirt" as primes for the t...
Article
Full-text available
Four lexical decision experiments are reported that use the masked priming paradigm to study the role of letter position information in orthographic processing. In Experiments 1 and 2, superset primes, formed by repetition of 1 or 2 letters of the target (e.g., jusstice-JUSTICE) or by insertion of 1 or 2 unrelated letters (e.g., juastice-JUSTICE),...

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