Eva-Maria Zetsche

Eva-Maria Zetsche
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich | LMU · Unit for Research Funding

PhD Ecology

About

29
Publications
11,812
Reads
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533
Citations
Introduction
I am now a liasion officer working in the Research Services of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. I focus on giving support to researchers for all international funding opportunities, in particular EU funding calls, and in particular in relation to the natural sciences. Prior to this position I have predominantly been working in the field of marine ecology.
Additional affiliations
November 2015 - present
University of Gothenburg
Position
  • Marie Curie Fellow
Description
  • Marie Curie Fellowship
November 2015 - October 2017
NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
Position
  • Guest scientist
Description
  • During my Marie Curie Fellowship (based in Gothenburg) I will continue collaborations with the NIOZ.
November 2014 - October 2015
NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Diatom aggregates constitute a significant fraction of the particle flux from the euphotic zone into the mesopelagic ocean as part of the ocean's biological carbon pump. Modeling studies of their exchange processes with the surrounding water usually assume spherical shape and that aggregates are impermeable to flow. Using particle image velocimetry...
Article
Full-text available
Cable bacteria are multicellular, filamentous microorganisms that are capable of transporting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Although recently discovered, these bacteria appear to be widely present in the seafloor, and when active they exert a strong imprint on the local geochemistry. In particular, their electrogenic metabolism induces...
Article
Full-text available
Almost a century ago Redfield discovered a relatively constant ratio between carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in particulate organic matter, and nitrogen and phosphorus of dissolved nutrients in seawater. Since then, the riverine export of nitrogen to the ocean has increased 20‐fold. High abundance of resting stages in sediment layers dated more th...
Article
Full-text available
Cable bacteria are long, multicellular micro-organisms that are capable of transporting electrons from cell to cell along the longitudinal axis of their centimeter-long filaments. The conductive structures that mediate this long-distance electron transport are thought to be located in the cell envelope. Therefore, this study examines in detail the...
Article
Full-text available
Cable bacteria are multicellular, filamentous microorganisms that are capable of transporting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Although recently discovered, these bacteria appear to be widely present in the seafloor, and when active, they exert a strong imprint on the local geochemistry. In particular, their electrogenic metabolism induce...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to quantify vital aquatic organisms in the 2–50 µm size range was compared between five different flow cytometers and several different microscopes. Counts of calibration beads, algal monocultures of different sizes as well as organisms in a Wadden Sea sample were compared. Flow cytometers and microscopes delivered different bead concen...
Article
Full-text available
Particles of all origins (biogenic, lithogenic, as well as anthropogenic) are fundamental components of the coastal ocean and are re-distributed by a wide variety of transport processes at both horizontal and vertical scales. Suspended particles can act as vehicles, as well as carbon and nutrient sources, for microorganisms and zooplankton before e...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, long filamentous bacteria have been reported conducting electrons over centimetre distances in marine sediments. These so-called cable bacteria perform an electrogenic form of sulfur oxidation, whereby long-distance electron transport links sulfide oxidation in deeper sediment horizons to oxygen reduction in the upper millimetres of the s...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, long filamentous bacteria have been reported to conduct electrons over centimetre distances in marine sediments. These so-called cable bacteria perform a novel "electrogenic" form of sulfur oxidation, whereby long-distance electron transport links sulfide oxidation in deeper sediment horizons to oxygen reduction in the upper millimetres o...
Article
Full-text available
Benthic algae or microphytobenthos (MPB) in intertidal flats play an important role in the sediment and overlying water ecosystems. We hypothesize that there are effects of sediment texture on the vertical distribution of MPB using chlorophyll a (chl a) as a proxy for MPB biomass and present results over a 2.5-year period. Four sites were sampled m...
Article
Full-text available
Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus production are currently still poorly described because the exis...
Data
Movement of particle-laden mucus strings. Activated charcoal particles entrapped in mucus strings are moved along the thecal walls of Lophelia pertusa from the mouth area (upper edge) towards the lower parts and eventually base of the polyp (lower edge). (Video was captured at 1 frame s-1 and is shown at 2x speed). (MP4)
Data
Cilia along tentacles remove particles. The movement of (activated charcoal) particles along the tentacles of a Lophelia pertusa polyp is always towards the tips of the tentacles. (Video was captured at 1 frame s-1 and is shown at 2x speed). (MP4)
Data
Mucus release associated with the digestion of the shrimp nauplius Artemia salina by Lophelia pertusa. First the light intensity information is displayed before the phase information is shown. In the latter, lighter areas clearly depict mucoid substances being released from the mouth area located in the central part of the image. The polyp shown co...
Data
Vortical movement of particle strings. Along the polyp surfaces particle strings were observed to follow circular motions on several occasions, here exemplified by one such incident. (Video was captured at 1 frame s-1 and is shown at 4x speed). (MP4)
Article
Recent advances in optical components, computational hardware and image analysis algorithms have led to the development of a powerful new imaging tool, digital holographic microscopy (DHM). So far, DHM has been predominantly applied in the life sciences and medical research, and here, we evaluate the potential of DHM within a marine context, i.e. f...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, a novel mode of sulphur oxidation was described in marine sediments, in which sulphide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers was electrically coupled to oxygen reduction at the sediment surface. Subsequent experimental evidence identified that long filamentous bacteria belonging to the family Desulfobulbaceae likely mediated the electron tran...
Article
Traditional taxonomic identification of planktonic organisms is based on light microscopy, which is both time-consuming and tedious. In response, novel ways of automated (machine) identification, such as flow cytometry, have been investigated over the last two decades. To improve the taxonomic resolution of particle analysis, recent developments ha...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid and efficient analysis of plankton samples (e.g. enumeration, identification, biomass determination) has been an important driver for recent technological developments in (semi-) automated analysis and imaging instruments. Most focus has been on identification and abundance estimates, while less attention has been given to viability, i.e....
Article
Full-text available
Rapid organic matter turnover is driven by advective transport processes in sandy permeable sediments, allowing them to act as biocatalytic filters. This filtering capacity is largely defined by the permeability of the sediment, which describes the flow of water through a porous medium. However, little is known about the temporal variability of san...
Thesis
Full-text available
While it has been widely accepted that numerous coral reefs, particularly in the Caribbean, have undergone a transition from coral-to-algal dominated communities, the reasons for this are still subject of an on-going debate. Apart from effects of reduced herbivory and nutrient enrichment, coral cover decline from bleaching, diseases and other physi...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Primary production by diatoms based on nitrate in upwelling zones, and primary production by N2-fixing cyanobacteria comprise substantial sources of new production in the ocean. This new production reflects the export production out of the euphotic zone leading to net CO2 sequestration from the atmosphere by the ocean over longer time-scales. A significant fraction of these carbon and nitrogen fluxes are associated to suspended and sinking organic aggregates composed of diatoms, cyanobacteria, and/or detritus including zooplankton fecal pellets in the ocean. Hence, our mechanistic understanding and quantification of the processes controlling small-scale O2, carbon, and nitrogen fluxes associated with these aggregates, are important for our understanding of large-scale biogeochemical processes in the ocean. By combining digital holographic microscopy, microsensors (O2 and N2O), stable isotope tracers, novel secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and sensitive fluorometry with analytical and numerical modeling, we aim to: 1) quantify the physical/chemical/biological constraints for bacterial growth, and carbon and nitrogen transformation rates in suspended and sinking organic aggregates in the ocean 2) quantify the fluxes of C and N from diatoms to associated bacteria at a single cell level to reveal the identity, specificity, and activity of various bacteria colonizing aggregates 3) quantify O2 and inorganic nitrogen fluxes in suspended and sinking organic aggregate as a function of O2 concentration in the ambient water
Project
Chain-forming diatoms are key CO2-fixing organisms in the ocean. They play a significant role in the ocean’s biological carbon pump by forming fast-sinking aggregates, which are exported from the upper sunlit ocean to the mesopelagic and deep-ocean, or to shallow sediments. Using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in combination with stable isotopic tracers we can now reveal assimilation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and nitrogen (DIN) at a single-cell level in mixed field populations. With this novel approach, we will investigate the correlation between CO2 sequestration and nutrient uptake in chain-forming diatoms from measurements of its physical, chemical and biological constraints in field populations, in laboratory cultures, and in diatom cells revived from up to 100 years old spores recently recovered from anoxic, laminated sediments.