Eva Maire

Eva Maire
Lancaster University | LU · Lancaster Environment Centre

PhD

About

36
Publications
18,004
Reads
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1,323
Citations
Introduction
Engineer by training with an inter-disciplinary focus (ecosystem management, ecology, life sciences, socioeconomic), I completed a PhD in 2018 at the interface between ecology and social science at the University of Montpellier/MARBEC (France) and James Cook University/ARC Centre of Excellence of Coral Reefs Studies (Australia). My current research aims to understand how the heterogeneity of socio-economic and ecological drivers affect the facets of fish biodiversity in coral reef ecosystems.
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - October 2018
Université de Montpellier
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • How coral reef fish communities are shaped by both socioeconomic drivers and larval dispersal patterns in Madagascar?
November 2014 - December 2014
James Cook University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Global map of accessibility of Coral Reefs based on travel time from human settlements and markets. Distribution of marine protected areas in terms of their remoteness from people.
Education
September 2010 - September 2014
L'institut Agro | Montpellier SupAgro
Field of study
  • Life Sciences Engineering & Environment Management

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
The depletion of natural resources has become a major issue in many parts of the world, with the most accessible resources being most at risk. In the terrestrial realm, resource depletion has classically been related to accessibility through road networks. By contrast, in the marine realm, the impact on living resources is often framed into the Mal...
Article
Full-text available
AimFunctional diversity is a key facet of biodiversity that is increasingly being measured to quantify its changes following disturbance and to understand its effects on ecosystem functioning. Assessing the functional diversity of assemblages based on species traits requires the building of a functional space (dendrogram or multidimensional space)...
Article
Effective solutions to the ongoing “coral reef crisis” will remain limited until the underlying drivers of coral reef degradation are better understood. Here, we conduct a global-scale study of how four key metrics of ecosystem states and processes on coral reefs (top predator presence, reef fish biomass, trait diversity, and parrotfish scraping po...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing speed and magnitude of global change threaten the world’s biodiversity and particularly coral reef fishes. A better understanding of large-scale patterns and processes on coral reefs is essential to prevent fish biodiversity decline but it requires new monitoring approaches. Here, we use environmental DNA metabarcoding to reconstruct wel...
Preprint
Tropical reefs provide livelihood and food security to millions of people. However, tropical reefs are entering new configurations requiring management strategies to incorporate process-oriented measures such as biomass production to determine their dynamics and resilience. We proposed a new framework, comprising three management strategies based o...
Article
Full-text available
Wild-caught fish are a bioavailable source of nutritious food that, if managed strategically , could enhance diet quality for billions of people. However, optimising nutrient production from the sea has not been a priority, hindering development of nutrition-sensitive policies. With fisheries management increasingly effective at rebuilding stocks a...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is transforming coral reefs, threatening supply of essential dietary micronutrients from small-scale fisheries to tropical coastal communities. Yet the nutritional value of reef fisheries and climate impacts on micronutrient availability remain unclear, hindering efforts to sustain food and nutrition security. Here, we measure nutrie...
Article
Full-text available
Functional diversity (FD), the diversity of organism attributes that relates to their interactions with the abiotic and biotic environment, has been increasingly used for the last two decades in ecology, biogeography and conservation. Yet, FD has many facets and their estimations are not standardized nor embedded in a single tool. mFD (multifaceted...
Article
Full-text available
Quantifying fish species diversity in rich tropical marine environments remains challenging. Environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding is a promising tool to face this challenge through the filtering, amplification, and sequencing of DNA traces from water samples. However, because eDNA concentration is low in marine environments, the reliability of eD...
Article
Coral reefs are harbingers of environmental change. In this issue of One Earth, Eddy et al. analyze long-term declines in reef condition and fish catches. Here, we highlight how policies that secure coral reefs as local food systems can safeguard diverse, nutrient rich diets and support vulnerable social-ecological systems.
Article
Estuaries are characterized by a tidal regime and are strongly influenced by hydrodynamics and host diverse and highly dynamic habitats, from fresh, brackish, or saltwater to terrestrial, whose biodiversity is especially difficult to monitor. Here, we investigated the potential of environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding, with three primer sets targe...
Article
Full-text available
Fish are rich in bioavailable micronutrients, such as zinc and iron, deficiencies of which are a global food security concern.¹,² Global marine fisheries yields are threatened by climate change and overfishing,³,⁴ yet understanding of how these stressors affect the nutrients available from fisheries is lacking.⁵,⁶ Here, using global assessments of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying the diversity of species in rich tropical marine environments remains challenging. Environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding is a promising tool to face this challenge through the filtering, amplification, and sequencing of DNA traces from water samples. However, the reliability of biodiversity detection from eDNA samples can be low in mar...
Presentation
Full-text available
Abstract for DNAQUA International Conference : international Conference on the Use of DNA for Water Biomonitoring - 2021
Article
Full-text available
Environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis is a revolutionary method to monitor marine biodiversity from animal DNA traces. Examining the capacity of eDNA to provide accurate biodiversity measures in species‐rich ecosystems such as coral reefs is a prerequisite for their application in long‐term monitoring. Here, we surveyed two Colombian tropical marine re...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid degradation of the world's coral reefs jeopardizes their ecological functioning and ultimately imperils the well-being of the millions of people with reef-dependent livelihoods. Ecosystem accessibility is the main driver of their conditions, with the most accessible ecosystems being most at risk of resource depletion. People's socioeconomic c...
Article
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Many islands are biodiversity hotspots but also extinction epicenters. In addition to strong cultural connections to nature, islanders derive a significant part of their economy and broader wellbeing from this biodiversity. Islands are thus considered as the socio-ecosystems most vulnerable to species and habitat loss. Yet, the extent and key corre...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reef fisheries depend on reef fish biomass to support ecosystem functioning and sustainable fisheries. Here, we evaluated coral reefs across 4,000 km of the Indonesian archipelago to reveal a large gradient of biomass, from <100 kg/ha to >17,000 kg/ha. Trophic pyramids characterized by planktivore dominance emerged at high biomass, suggesting...
Article
The worldwide decline of coral reefs necessitates targeting management solutions that can sustain reefs and the livelihoods of the people who depend on them. However, little is known about the context in which different reef management tools can help to achieve multiple social and ecological goals. Because of nonlinearities in the likelihood of ach...
Article
Full-text available
Wilderness areas offer unparalleled ecosystem conditions. However, growing human populations and consumption are among factors that drive encroachment on these areas. Here, we explore the threat of small‐scale fisheries to wilderness reefs by developing a framework and modeling fluctuations in fishery range with fuel costs and fish prices. We model...
Article
The observation of trophic interactions such as predation provide valuable information to model food webs and better understand ecosystem functioning. Such information is crucial for rare and endangered species in order to adapt management measures and ensure their conservation. However, trophic interactions are rarely observed in the marine realm,...
Article
Full-text available
Without drastic efforts to reduce carbon emissions and mitigate globalized stressors, tropical coral reefs are in jeopardy. Strategic conservation and management requires identification of the environmental and socioeconomic factors driving the persistence of scleractinian coral assemblages—the foundation species of coral reef ecosystems. Here, we...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1950s, industrial fisheries have expanded globally, as fishing vessels are required to travel further afield for fishing opportunities. Technological advancements and fishery subsidies have granted ever-increasing access to populations of sharks, tunas, billfishes, and other predators. Wilderness refuges, defined here as areas beyond the...
Article
Full-text available
Aim To investigate biotic and abiotic correlates of reef‐fish species richness across multiple spatial scales. Location Tropical reefs around the globe, including 485 sites in 109 sub‐provinces spread across 14 biogeographic provinces. Time period Present. Major taxa studied 2,523 species of reef fish. Methods We compiled a database encompassin...
Article
Full-text available
Determining whether many functionally complementary species or only a subset of key species are necessary to maintain ecosystem functioning and services is a critical question in community ecology and biodiversity conservation. Identifying such key species remains challenging, especially in the tropics where many species co-occur and can potentiall...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs provide ecosystem goods and services for millions of people in the tropics, but reef conditions are declining worldwide. Effective solutions to the crisis facing coral reefs depend in part on understanding the context under which different types of conservation benefits can be maximized. Our global analysis of nearly 1,800 tropical reef...
Article
Sobral et al. (Ecology Letters, 19, 2016, 1091) reported that the loss of bird functional and phylogenetic diversity due to species extinctions was not compensated by exotic species introductions. Here, we demonstrate that the reported changes in biodiversity were underestimated because of methodological pitfalls.
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing declines in the structure and function of the world's coral reefs require novel approaches to sustain these ecosystems and the millions of people who depend on them. A presently unexplored approach that draws on theory and practice in human health and rural development is to systematically identify and learn from the 'outliers'-places where...