Eva A. Cougnon

Eva A. Cougnon
University of Tasmania · Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

BSc, MS, PhD

About

18
Publications
3,220
Reads
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273
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
262 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Additional affiliations
February 2019 - present
University of Tasmania
Position
  • Antarctic coastal ocean modeller
January 2017 - January 2019
University of Tasmania
Position
  • Fellow
Education
October 2012 - October 2016
University of Tasmania
Field of study
  • Physical oceanography -- ocean/ice shelf interaction
September 2009 - June 2011
Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III
Field of study
  • Physical oceanography and atmosphere
September 2006 - June 2009
La Rochelle Université
Field of study
  • Earth sciences

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Sea ice forms a barrier to the exchange of energy, gases, moisture and particles between the ocean and atmosphere around Antarctica. Ice temperature, salinity and the composition of ice crystals determine whether a particular slab of sea ice is habitable for microorganisms and permeable to exchanges between the ocean and atmosphere, allowing, for e...
Article
Recent marine heatwave (MHW) events in the Tasman Sea have had dramatic impacts on the ecosystems, fisheries and aquaculture off Tasmania’s east coast. However, our understanding of the large-scale drivers (forcing) and potential predictability of MHW events in this region off southeast Australia is still in its infancy. Here, we investigate the ro...
Article
Full-text available
In the Southern Ocean, polynyas exhibit enhanced rates of primary productivity and represent large seasonal sinks for atmospheric CO2. Three contrasting east Antarctic polynyas were visited in late December-early January 2017: the Dalton, Mertz and Ninnis polynyas. In the Mertz and Ninnis polynyas, phytoplankton biomass (average of 322 and 354 mg C...
Article
Full-text available
Seafloor communities are a critical part of the unique and diverse Antarctic marine life. Processes at the ocean-surface can strongly influence the diversity and abundance of these communities, even when they live at hundreds of meters water depth. However, even though we understand the importance of this link, there are so far no quantitative spat...
Preprint
Seafloor communities are a critical part of the unique and diverse Antarctic marine life. Processes at the ocean-surface can strongly influence the diversity and abundance of these communities, even when they live at hundreds of meters water depth. However, even though we understand the importance of this link, there are so far no quantitative spat...
Article
Full-text available
The Southern Ocean has taken up more than 40% of the total anthropogenic carbon (Cant) stored in the oceans since the preindustrial era, mainly in subantarctic mode and intermediate waters (SAMW-AAIW). However, the physical mechanisms responsible for the transfer of Cant into the ocean interior remain poorly understood. Here, we use high resolution...
Article
Ice shelf basal melt is the dominant contribution to mass loss from Antarctic ice shelves. However, the sensitivity of basal melt to changes in icescape (grounded icebergs, ice shelves and sea ice) and related ocean circulation is poorly understood. Here, we simulate the impact of the major 2010 calving event of the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT), East...
Article
Full-text available
Observed thinning of the Totten Glacier in East Antarctica has cast doubt upon the stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Recent oceanographic observations at the front of the Totten Ice Shelf have confirmed the presence of modified Circumpolar Deep Water (mCDW), which likely promotes enhanced melting. Details of how this water accesses the she...
Article
Full-text available
The dramatic calving of the Mertz Glacier tongue in 2010, precipitated by the movement of iceberg B09B, reshaped the oceanographic regime across the Mertz Polynya and Commonwealth Bay, regions where high-salinity shelf water (HSSW) – the precursor to Antarctic bottom water (AABW) – is formed. Here we present post-calving observations that suggest t...
Article
Full-text available
We present simulation results from a version of the Regional Ocean Modeling System modified for ice shelf/ocean interaction, including the parameterisation of basal melting by molecular diffusion alone. Simulations investigate the differences in melting for an idealised ice shelf experiencing a range of cold to hot ocean cavity conditions. Both the...
Article
Full-text available
The dramatic calving of the Mertz Glacier Tongue in 2010, triggered by the impact of iceberg B09B, reshaped the oceanographic regime across the Mertz Polynya and Commonwealth Bay, regions where high salinity shelf water (HSSW) is formed, the precursor to Antarctic bottom water (AABW). Here we compare post-calving observations with high-resolution o...
Article
As climate change reshapes the Earth's polar regions, scientists turn to drone-mounted cameras to measure sea ice. One expedition found out that flying drones near Antarctica isn't easy.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Ice shelves are an important control on Antarctic mass loss and global sea level rise. The ability of ice shelves to provide back stress on tributary glaciers is controlled by the rate at which mass is lost into the ocean. This is principally through basal melting and iceberg calving (calving has recently been suggested to be enhanced by strong bas...
Article
Ocean observations around the Australian‐Antarctic basin show the importance of coastal latent heat polynyas near the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT) to the formation of Dense Shelf Water (DSW) and associated Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Here, we use a regional ocean/ice shelf model to investigate the interannual variability of the export of DSW from...
Conference Paper
In February 2010, the tongue of the Mertz Glacier calved, releasing an 80x30km iceberg. We had anticipated this calving event and started observing it's development as well as gathering data to monitor the dynamics of the glacier upstream. Here, we present the main characteristics of Mertz Glacier in the context of this calving event. In addition t...

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