Eugenie C Yen

Eugenie C Yen
Queen Mary, University of London | QMUL · School of Biological and Chemical Sciences

MPhil

About

4
Publications
546
Reads
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18
Citations
Introduction
London NERC DTP PhD student in the Eizaguirre Lab at Queen Mary University of London. Using genomic and epigenomic approaches to study the adaptive potential of loggerhead sea turtles in a warming world. Previously an MPhil student in the Butterfly Genetics Group at the University of Cambridge, where I worked on the evolutionary genomics of the wood tiger moth.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - March 2020
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Continued research from my MPhil working on the evolutionary genomics of the wood tiger moth (Arctia plantaginis), in the lab of Prof. Chris Jiggins
Education
October 2018 - October 2019
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences (Zoology)
October 2015 - June 2018
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Natural Sciences

Publications

Publications (4)
Preprint
Full-text available
Colour is often used as an aposematic warning signal, with predator learning expected to lead to a single colour pattern within a population. However, there are many puzzling cases where aposematic signals are also polymorphic. The wood tiger moth, Arctia plantaginis , uses bright hindwing colours as a signal of unpalatability, and males have discr...
Article
Full-text available
Background Diploid genome assembly is typically impeded by heterozygosity because it introduces errors when haplotypes are collapsed into a consensus sequence. Trio binning offers an innovative solution that exploits heterozygosity for assembly. Short, parental reads are used to assign parental origin to long reads from their F1 offspring before as...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Diploid genome assembly is typically impeded by heterozygosity, as it introduces errors when haplotypes are collapsed into a consensus sequence. Trio binning offers an innovative solution which exploits heterozygosity for assembly. Short, parental reads are used to assign parental origin to long reads from their F1 offspring before assem...

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