Eugenia V Bragina

Eugenia V Bragina
University of Wisconsin–Madison | UW · Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology

PhD

About

23
Publications
8,149
Reads
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603
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in wildlife conservation. For the time being, I work at University of Wisconsin-Madison studying population trends of big mammals in last 30 years as well as land use change in post-Soviet countries.
Additional affiliations
April 2011 - present
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2006 - May 2013
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • I studied communication of endangered crane species, in particular Siberian crane Grus leucogeranus and White-naped crane Grus vipio.
January 2006 - March 2011
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Leading a summer camp for sophomore students; vertebrate zoology lab; Supervision students; Workshop instructor

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Moose (Alces alces) may be among one of the most susceptible big game species to climate change. Development of long-term circumpolar databases of this species’ densities and distributions, combined with biological, ecological, and management-related metrics, can help guide research and future international management strategies. We emulated method...
Article
European Russia rapidly transitioned after the collapse of the Soviet Union from state socialism to a market economy. How did this political and economic transformation interact with ecological conditions to determine forest loss and gain? We explore this question with a study of European Russia in the two decades following the collapse of the Sovi...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying the factors that determine habitat suitability and hence patterns of wildlife abundances over broad spatial scales is important for conservation. Ecosystem productivity is a key aspect of habitat suitability, especially for large mammals. Our goals were to a) explain patterns of moose (Alces alces) abundance across Russia based on remot...
Article
We stand by our conclusion that there have not been large‐scale declines in white‐tailed deer populations following coyote colonization of the eastern United States. However, we agree that coyote predation can affect deer populations locally and therefore and should be considered in deer harvest planning in the region.
Article
Full-text available
When political regimes fall, economic conditions change and wildlife protection can be undermined. Eastern European countries experienced turmoil following the collapse of socialism in the early 1990s, raising the question of how wildlife was affected. We show that the aftermath of the collapse changed the population growth rates of various wildlif...
Article
Full-text available
Maintenance of biodiversity in a rapidly changing climate will depend on the efficacy of evolutionary rescue, whereby population declines due to abrupt environmental change are reversed by shifts in genetically driven adaptive traits. However, a lack of traits known to be under direct selection by anthropogenic climate change has limited the incorp...
Article
Full-text available
When political regimes fall, economic conditions change and wildlife protection can be undermined. Eastern European countries experienced turmoil following the collapse of socialism in the early 1990s, raising the question of how wildlife was affected. We show that the aftermath of the collapse changed the population growth rates of various wildlif...
Article
Full-text available
When timber harvesting is an important source of local income and forest resources are declining, even forests that are designated as protected areas may become vulnerable. Therefore, regular monitoring of forest disturbance is necessary to enforce the protection of forest ecosystems. However, mapping forest disturbance with satellite imagery can b...
Article
Full-text available
Vocal individuality provides a method of personalization for multiple avian species. However, expression of individual vocal features depends on necessity of recognition. Here we focused on chick vocalizations of demoiselle, Siberian and red-crowned cranes that differ by their body size, developmental rates and some ecological traits. Cranes are te...
Article
Full-text available
Anecdotal evidence suggests that socioeconomic shocks strongly affect wildlife populations, but quantitative evidence is sparse. The collapse of socialism in Russia in 1991 caused a major socioeconomic shock, including a sharp increase in poverty. Our goal was to analyze population trends of eight large mammals (5 herbivores and 3 carnivores) in Ru...
Article
Full-text available
The vocal development of cranes (Gruidae) has attracted scientific interest due to a special stage, so-called voice breaking. During voice breaking, chicks produce both adult low-frequency and juvenile high-frequency vocalizations. The triggers that affect voice breaking are unknown. For the first time, we study the vocal development of the Demoise...
Article
Full-text available
The demand for agricultural products continues to grow rapidly, but further agricultural expansion entails substantial environmental costs, making recultivating currently unused farmland an interesting alternative. The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 led to widespread abandonment of agricultural lands, but the extent and spatial patterns of ab...
Article
Full-text available
Sex-related and individually unique vocal features have been demonstrated for many avian and mammalian species. Vocal identity may depend on a call's function and vary within the repertoire of a single species. Vocal features of different call types are very rarely compared in one species. We studied the potential for vocal recognition of sex and i...
Article
Full-text available
Vocal individuality varies between species and/or ontogenesis stages depending on needs in the vocal recognition, but also estimation of individual differences depends on the method of analysis. We studied pair-specific differences of duets elicited by mating pairs of Siberian crane Grus leucogeranus. We quantitatively described the duet structure...
Article
Full-text available
Four call types were described: two signals are tonal, the other two are rhythmical. Among four sequences of calls, three ones are tonal and one is rhythmical. The strongly pronounced sexual differences were found in three of four call types. Individual differences of the signals were weakly expressed. The main frequency of sounds in Siberian crane...
Conference Paper
Voice breaking is sudden decrease of voice frequency from “chicks” to “adult” one. That is, main frequency reduces from 2200-2600 Hz to 700-800 Hz. This change happens in a very short time, one-two weeks, and can not be explained by morphological modifications. Archibald (1976) believed that breaking of voice may be important factor for expulsion c...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Dear friends,
According to a funding agency requirement, we need to get our research published by the end of this year. It's a manuscript about how crane calls change if birds are hungry. In other words, vocal indicators of hunger in birds. Any idea? We are ready to go for not as great journal if it can be fast. Thank you!

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Project mapped the world-wide distributions of seasonal coat color molting species and their color morphs. Seasonal coat color morphs identify regions globally with enhanced adaptive potential for a fitness relevant trait under direct selection due to reduced snow duration caused by climate change.