Eugène Warmenbol

Eugène Warmenbol
Université Libre de Bruxelles | ULB · Centre de Recherche en Archéologie et Patrimoine

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62
Publications
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Publications

Publications (62)
Article
Full-text available
The high temperatures reached during cremation lead to the destruction of organic matter preventing the use of traditional isotopic methods for dietary reconstructions. Still, strontium isotope (87 Sr/ 86 Sr) and concentration ([Sr]) analyses of cremated human remains offer a novel way to assess changing consumption patterns in past populations tha...
Article
Studies of funerary practices provide information about many aspects of death in past societies. However, only limited archaeological evidence documents the circumstances under which cremations occurred and the person(s) who were performing the funerary rituals. Lying at the border between Atlantic and Continental cultural traditions, the Scheldt a...
Article
Full-text available
Cremation is a complex mortuary practice, involving a number of activities of the living towards the dead before, during, and after the destruction of the bodily soft tissues by fire. The limiting information concerning these behavioral patterns obtained from the pyre remains and/or cremation deposits prevents the reconstruction of the handling of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The scope of the paper concerns a review of one single glass item at the MAS (Museum aan de Stroom), Antwerp which is known as the Alexander medallion. The authenticity of this intriguing large relief medallion in opaque turquoise blue glass has been an issue for some time but only recently an in-depth analysis of the piece and its ori- gin was per...
Article
The funerary Bronze Age culture in the Belgian part of the Meuse valley is poorly understood due to the challenging nature of cremation deposits that dominate the archaeological record. Only a few sites were analysed in that region, limiting the possibilities to reconstruct the development of Bronze Age populations in Belgium. Due to its good prese...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The CRUMBEL project brings together researchers from three Belgian universities and the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage. The purpose of this collaboration is to study the Belgian archaeological collections of cremated bones dating from the Neolithic till the Merovingian period. Th e project aims to improve knowledge concerning the living cond...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to better understand the development of group identity, mobility, and health in the Early Medieval Meuse Valley. This is achieved by combining existing demographic and palaeopathological information from 73 cremation deposits from Echt, the Netherlands, with new strontium isotope ratios (⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr) and strontium concentrations ([Sr]...
Book
Full-text available
The ancient glass collection is one of the hidden gems at the MAS (Antwerp, Belgium). It is part of a valuable glass collection numbering nearly 700 objects and is on a par with other international collections of glass. Now, for the first time, the subcollection of ancient glass is published in this comprehensive catalogue. The ancient glass collec...
Article
Objectives This study aims to increase the rate of correctly sexed calcined individuals from archaeological and forensic contexts. This is achieved by evaluating sexual dimorphism of commonly used and new skeletal elements via uni‐ and multi‐variate metric trait analyses. Materials and methods Twenty‐two skeletal traits were evaluated in 86 indivi...
Article
Studies of funerary practices provide information about many aspects of death in past societies. However, only limited archaeological evidence documents the circumstances under which cremations occurred and the person(s) who were performing the funerary rituals. Lying at the border between Atlantic and Continental cultural traditions, the Scheldt a...
Chapter
Full-text available
Although Leopold I, first King of the Belgians (1790–1865, r. 1831–1865), already had expansionist views and multiplied commercial deals with foreign countries, his son, who was a born businessman, longed for more proactive actions in order to make his future realm a prosperous European power. Young Leopold was a quick learner and he realized quite...
Article
Full-text available
Caverne X in Waulsort (Namur province, Belgium), excavated in the 19 th century, revealed a burial site which was unexpectedly dated to the Final Upper Paleolithic (10,820 ± 80 BP, OxA-6856) in the 1990's. A re-examination of the collection and a new radiocarbon dating program was recently undertaken. The dates obtained on four left femurs (9285 ±...
Article
Full-text available
The adoption of a new funerary ritual with all its social and cognitive meanings is of great importance to understanding social transformations of past societies. The first known occurrence of cremation in the territory corresponding to modern Belgium dates back to the Mesolithic period. From the end of the Neolithic onward, the practice of cremati...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
L’article suivant est un résumé des résultats préliminaires des crémations étudiées dans le cadre du projet CRUMBEL (Crémations, urnes et mobilité, la dynamique du peuplement de la Belgique - Projet EOS N°30999782) qui seront publiés dans une prochaine monographie dédiée au site de Pommeroeul.
Article
Full-text available
The CRUMBEL project aims to investigate the mobility of the former population in Belgium from the Neolithic period until the Early Middle Ages. To reach these research goals different topics will be studied. In a preliminary phase, the ancient collections of cremated bone will be documented. A selection of these funerary sites will be studied to un...
Article
Full-text available
In this brief note, the authors seek only to change the label on a "found at Dourbes" beaker before he can be found in archaeological literature as a campaniform beaker. It is a ceramic mounted with the help of a slow lathe (which allowed a regular brushing), which belongs neither to the Chalcolithic, nor to the Metal Ages, nor even to the local G...
Article
Full-text available
résumé Cette publication présente l'étude des reste humains des grottes II et III du site des Avins (comm. de Clavier, Prov. de Liège, BE). Les datations C14 effectuées à l'IRPA ont montré qu'une partie des restes datent du Néolithique moyen, et d’autres du Néolithique récent/final, comme c'est le cas pour les restes provenant des Avins I, permetta...
Chapter
This book can be purchased directly at the publisher's website: https://www.editions-mergoil.com/fr/monographies-instrumentum/209-studies-in-experimental-archaeometallurgy-methodological-approaches-from-non-ferrous-metallurgies.html
Conference Paper
Full-text available
If post-cremation life histories of cremains and cremation-related deposits can be readily investigated as they refer to the last handling of the deceased, the treatment of the corpse during the burning act itself is little addressed by textual sources and often discussed in anthropological studies. Among the topics discussed are questions whether...
Chapter
Caves are unique and enigmatic places, quite unlike other types of archaeological site. Sitting between worlds—between the above-ground world of the living and the underworld of gods and ancestors—they have always attracted specific kinds of activities in which the power and fabric of the spaces themselves are integral, not least in the prehistoric...
Chapter
Full-text available
The cave of Han-sur-Lesse was visited intermittently in the Late Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age and Roman period. Thousands of artefacts have been recovered from the bottom of the River Lesse where it exits the cave, at a location between light and darkness. Other material was recovered from two dry galleries, opening onto the river, including the...
Book
The recent resurgence of academic interest in caves has demonstrated the central roles they played as arenas for ritual, ceremony and performance, and their importance within later prehistoric cosmologies. Caves represent very particular types of archaeological site and require novel approaches to their recording, interpretation and presentation. T...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The current paper reviews a part of the so far unnoticed but rich glass collection at the ‘Museum aan de Stroom’ (MAS) in Antwerp encompassing objects from Roman times to the 20th century. We limit ourselves to highlight the story behind some of the prominent collections, which the museum accumulated during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The ke...
Article
Full-text available
Sperm whales do not belong to the North Sea, but could be observed, even from very close, as they frequently strand on the beaches. The animal seems to have given his very typical outline to the decorated Late Bronze Age razors from Scandinavia and Northern Germany. One has to «read» these systematically, with the handle at the bottom right. But th...
Article
Our knowledge of the Belgian Bronze Age is still very partial. Most of the bronze objects of this period — and I am not the only one to say they are important — remain unpublished. The reason for this is to be found in the fact that a great many bronzes have been, or still are, part of private collections. Objects fundamental to our understanding o...
Article
Full-text available
A propos d'une armoire de Giuseppe Parvis, négociant italien établi au Caire.
Article
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Underwater excavation in the caves of Han-sur-Lesse (Province of Namur, Belgium) has produced thousands of artifacts dating essentially from the Late Neolithic, La Mile period and late Higher Empire. In this paper the Ancient and Middle La Tene datable material is reported. Part of the latter, probably the most ancient (decorated situlae, phalera,...
Article
Full-text available
The urnfields in western Belgium have been studied since the second half of the 20th century. Most of these studies, as well as the excavations themselves, date from before the last quarter of the 20th century, except for the urnfields at Velzeke and Blicquy, which were excavated recently. The chronology of these cemeteries was largely based on typ...
Article
Gold remains a rare material during the whole Bronze Age. It is a metal that circulates amongst the elites exclusively. The exchange of gold artefacts over very long distances is fundamental in the build-up of socio-political relations. Fifty artefacts found during subaquatic excavations in the river Lesse in the cave of Han-sur-Lesse have been sub...
Article
The tomb of Seshemnefer-Heba in Saqqara was excavated in 1860 by Mariette. Only the false-door was published, and allegedly transferred to the Cairo Museum, while the reliefs decorating the chapel were reburied. These resurfaced as separate blocks in private collections in the 1960s. A remarkable addition to the series is a block from the north wal...
Article
Full-text available
The tomb of Seshemnefer-Heba in Saqqara was excavated in 1860 by Mariette. Only the false-door was published, and allegedly transferred to the Cairo Museum, while the reliefs decorating the chapel were reburied. These resurfaced as separate blocks in private collections in the 1960s. A remarkable addition to the series is a block from the north wal...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
In Belgium, Egyptology emerged later than elsewhere in Europe, but once under steam, it went through a rapid growth in the course of the first half of the 20th century. In the 1930s Brussels was occasionally even referred to as ‘the capital of Egyptology'. Pyramids and Progress investigates how this remarkable development unfolded within the context of Belgian industrial and political expansionism towards Egypt, a process that started in the 19th century, almost from the very moment that the Belgian state was created in 1830. At that time, Belgium in all regards aspired to become a player on a global scale. This aspiration not only concerned Congo, which was to become a genuine colony, but areas around the globe. Egypt, with its strategic location in Africa and its fascinating ancient monuments, played a key role. But what motivated this Belgian interest in Egypt? How did Belgian royalty, politicians, diplomats, industrialists, and intellectuals operate within the expansionist doctrine? And how did the scientific discipline of Egyptology develop in Belgium within this expansionist framework? The personal, institutional, and commercial networks of the different players are investigated, and the question is asked how this led to a climate in which famous Egyptologists like Jean Capart proved able to give their discipline the prominent position it finally acquired in Belgium.
Project
The CRUMBEL project studies the collections of cremated bone found in Belgium dating from the Neolithic to the Early-Medieval period using state of the art analytical and geochemical analyses. Recording the Belgian collections in a database including as much osteoarchaeological information represents a crucial part of this project. Until now the dominance of cremation as funeral practice between 3000 BC and 700 AD in Northern Europe led to limited information on migrations and living conditions. CRUMBEL will greatly improve our current understanding of how people lived in Belgium. https://www.crumbel.org/