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Eugene V. Ryabov

Eugene V. Ryabov
University of Maryland, College Park & United States Department of Agriculture

PhD - Molecular Biology

About

175
Publications
29,144
Reads
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3,950
Citations
Introduction
Eugene Ryabov is a molecular virologist working on host-virus interactions in insects and plants. This includes virus diversity and evolution, impact of viruses on host physiology and development, and regulation of antiviral RNAi.
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - present
United States Department of Agriculture
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Honeybee RNA viruses
October 2015 - present
United States Department of Agriculture
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Molecular virologist, honeybee RNA viruses. Analysis of NGS virus and transcriptome data. Development of reverse genetics for insect RNA viruses.
December 2010 - July 2015
The University of Warwick
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Molecular virology of insect viruses (honeybees)
Education
September 1991 - January 1995
Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology, Moscow, Russia
Field of study
  • Virology
September 1986 - June 1991
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Field of study
  • Biology, Biochemistry, Virology

Publications

Publications (175)
Article
Full-text available
The globally distributed ectoparasite Varroa destructor is a vector for viral pathogens of the Western honeybee (Apis mellifera), in particular the Iflavirus Deformed Wing Virus (DWV). In the absence of Varroa low levels DWV occur, generally causing asymptomatic infections. Conversely, Varroa-infested colonies show markedly elevated virus levels, i...
Article
Full-text available
RNA viruses impact honey bee health and contribute to elevated colony loss rates worldwide. Deformed wing virus (DWV) and the closely related Varroa destructor virus-1 (VDV1), are the most widespread honey bee viruses. VDV1 is known to cause high rates of overwintering colony losses in Europe, however it was unknown in the United States (US). Using...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bees, the primary managed insect pollinator, suffer considerable losses due to Deformed wing virus (DWV), an RNA virus vectored by the mite Varroa destructor. Mite vectoring has resulted in the emergence of virulent DWV variants. The basis for such changes in DWV is poorly understood. Most importantly, it remains unclear whether replication o...
Article
Full-text available
The impacts of invertebrate RNA virus population dynamics on virulence and infection outcomes are poorly understood. Deformed wing virus (DWV), the main viral pathogen of honey bees, negatively impacts bee health, which can lead to colony death. Despite previous reports on the reduction of DWV diversity following the arrival of the parasitic mite V...
Article
Full-text available
Transmission routes impact pathogen virulence and genetics, therefore comprehensive knowledge of these routes and their contribution to pathogen circulation is essential for understanding host–pathogen interactions and designing control strategies. Deformed wing virus (DWV), a principal viral pathogen of honey bees associated with increased honey b...
Preprint
Deformed wing virus (DWV) is an emerging insect pathogen efficiently transmitted through communicable and vector-borne routes with Apis mellifera. Continual transmission of DWV between hosts and vectors is required for maintenance of the pathogen within the population, and this vector-host-pathogen system offers unique disease transmission dynamics...
Preprint
Full-text available
Deformed wing virus (DWV) is an emerging insect pathogen efficiently transmitted through communicable and vector-borne routes with Apis mellifera . Continual transmission of DWV between hosts and vectors is required for maintenance of the pathogen within the population, and this vector-host-pathogen system offers unique disease transmission dynamic...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor and the viruses it vectors, including types A and B of Deformed wing virus (DWV), pose a major threat to honey bees, Apis mellifera. Analysis of 256 mites collected from the same set of colonies on five occasions from May to October 2021 showed that less than a half of them, 39.8% (95% confidence interval (...
Preprint
Varroa destructor is a cosmopolitan pest and leading cause of colony loss of the European honey bee. Historically described as a competent vector of honey bee viruses, this arthropod vector is cause for the global pandemic of Deformed wing virus, now endemic in honeybee populations. Our work shows viral spread is driven by Varroa actively switching...
Article
Full-text available
In 1977, a sample of diseased adult honeybees ( Apis mellifera ) from Egypt was found to contain large amounts of a previously unknown virus, Egypt bee virus, which was subsequently shown to be serologically related to deformed wing virus (DWV). By sequencing the original isolate, we demonstrate that Egypt bee virus is in fact a fourth unique, majo...
Article
Full-text available
Insects are crucial for ecosystem functions and services and directly influence human well-being and health [...]
Article
Pollinators are in decline thanks to the combined stresses of disease, pesticides, habitat loss, and climate. Honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens but arguably none are as devastating as Deformed wing virus (DWV). Understanding host-pathogen interactions and virulence of DWV in honey bees is slowed by the lack of cost-effective high-through...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pollinators are in decline thanks to the combined stresses of disease, pesticides, habitat loss, and climate. Honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens but arguably none are as devastating as Deformed wing virus (DWV). Understanding host-pathogen interactions and virulence of DWV in honey bees is slowed by the lack of cost-effective high-through...
Preprint
Full-text available
Honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens but arguably none are as devastating as Deformed wing virus (DWV). Development of antiviral therapeutics and virus-resistant honey bee lines to control DWV in honey bees is slowed by the lack of a cost-effective high-throughput screening of DWV infection. Currently, analysis of virus infection and screen...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transmission routes impact pathogen virulence and genetics, therefore comprehensive knowledge of these routes and their contribution to pathogen circulation is essential for understanding host-pathogen interactions and designing control strategies. Deformed wing virus (DWV), a principal viral pathogen of honey bees associated with increased honey b...
Article
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is one of the most destructive pests of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the primary biotic cause of colony collapse in many regions of the world. These mites inflict physical injury on their honey bee hosts from feeding on host hemolymph and fat body cells/cellular components, and serve as the vector for...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transmission routes impact pathogen virulence and genetics, therefore comprehensive knowledge of these routes and their contribution to pathogen circulation is essential for understanding host-pathogen interactions and designing control strategies. Deformed wing virus (DWV), a principal viral pathogen of honey bees associated with increased honey b...
Data
Supplementary data file for 'Evidence for and against deformed wing virus spillover from honey bees to bumble bees: a reverse genetic study'.
Article
Full-text available
Deformed wing virus (DWV) is a persistent pathogen of European honey bees and the major contributor to overwintering colony losses. The prevalence of DWV in honey bees has led to significant concerns about spillover of the virus to other pollinating species. Bumble bees are both a major group of wild and commercially-reared pollinators. Several stu...
Method
Full-text available
This document includes detailed description of the sequencing of 5' terminal region of deformed wing virus genomic RNA, design and evaluation of full-length infections cDNA clone of natural recombinants between deformed wing virus (DWV-B) and Varroa destructor virus-1 (DWV-B), GenBank Accession number HM067438.
Article
Full-text available
We developed a honey bee RNA-virus vector based on the genome of a picorna-like Deformed wing virus (DWV), the main viral pathogen of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). To test the potential of DWV to be utilized as a vector, the 717 nt sequence coding for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), flanked by the peptides targeted by viral proteas...
Preprint
Full-text available
We developed a honey bee RNA-virus vector based on the genome of a picorna-like Deformed wing virus (DWV), the main viral pathogen of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). To test the potential of DWV to be utilized as a vector, the 717 nt sequence coding for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), flanked by the peptides targeted by viral proteas...
Preprint
Full-text available
We developed a honey bee RNA-virus vector based on the genome of a picorna-like Deformed wing virus (DWV), the main viral pathogen of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). To test the potential of DWV to be utilized as a vector, the 717 nt sequence coding for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), flanked by the peptides targeted by viral proteas...
Preprint
Full-text available
Deformed wing virus (DWV) is a persistent pathogen of European honey bees and the major contributor to overwintering colony losses. The prevalence of DWV in honey bees has led to significant concerns about spillover of the virus to other pollinating species. Bumble bees are both a major group of wild and commercially-reared pollinators. Several stu...
Article
Full-text available
The mite Varroa destructor is one of the most destructive parasites of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the primary cause of colony collapse in most regions of the world. These mites cause serious injury to their hosts, especially during the larval and pupal stages, and serve as the vector for several viruses, which affect honey bee health causin...
Poster
Full-text available
Reverse genetics for a virulent honey bee RNA virus Honey bees, the primary managed insect pollinator, suffer considerable losses due to Deformed wing virus (DWV), an RNA virus vectored by the mite Varroa destructor. Mite vectoring has resulted in the emergence of virulent DWV variants. The basis for such changes in DWV is poorly understood. We de...
Preprint
Full-text available
Honey bees, the primary managed insect pollinator, suffer considerable losses due to Deformed wing virus (DWV), an RNA virus vectored by the mite Varroa destructor . Mite vectoring has resulted in the emergence of virulent DWV variants. The basis for such changes in DWV is poorly understood. Most importantly, it remains unclear whether replication...
Preprint
Full-text available
The impacts of invertebrate RNA virus population dynamics on virulence and infection outcomes are poorly understood. Deformed wing virus (DWV), the main viral pathogen of honey bees, negatively impacts bee health which can lead to colony death. Despite previous reports on the reduction of DWV diversity following the arrival of the parasitic mite Va...
Article
Full-text available
Solinviviridae is a family of picorna/calici-like viruses with non-segmented, linear, positive-sense RNA genomes of approximately 10-11 kb. Unusually, their capsid proteins are encoded towards the 3'-end of the genome where they can be expressed both from a subgenomic RNA and as an extension of the replication (picorna-like helicase-protease-polyme...
Article
Full-text available
Polycipiviridae is a family of picorna-like viruses with non-segmented, linear, positive-sense RNA genomes of approximately 10-12 kb. Unusually for viruses within the order Picornavirales, their genomes are polycistronic, with four (or more) consecutive 5'-proximal open reading frames (ORFs) encoding structural (and possibly other) proteins and a l...
Article
Non-cell autonomous RNA silencing can spread from cell to cell and over long distances in animals and plants. However, the genetic requirements and signals involved in plant mobile gene silencing are poorly understood. Here, we identified a DICERLIKE2 (DCL2)-dependent mechanism for systemic spread of posttranscriptional RNA silencing, also known as...
Poster
Full-text available
Deformed wing virus (DWV) and its parasitic mite vector, Varroa destructor, are believed to be important causes for honey bee loss and colony failure. DWV is also common in wild bees and might play a role in their decline (Fürst et al., 2014). Varroa destructor alters the dynamics of DWV, and a new variant of DWV, genotype B (DWV-B, synonymous with...
Article
Full-text available
Non-cell autonomous RNA silencing can spread from cell to cell and over long-distance in animals and plants. However, the genetic requirements and signals involved in plant mobile silencing remain poorly understood. Here, we identified a DICER-LIKE2 (DCL2)-dependent mechanism for systemic spread of post-transcriptional RNA silencing (also known as...
Article
Full-text available
RNA silencing is an innate antiviral mechanism conserved in organisms across kingdoms. Such a cellular defence involves DICER or DICER-LIKEs (DCLs) that process plant virus RNAs into viral small interfering (vsi)RNAs. Plants encode four DCLs which play diverse roles in cell-autonomous intracellular virus-induced RNA silencing (known as VIGS) agains...
Article
Full-text available
Iflaviridae is a family of small non-enveloped viruses with monopartite, positive-stranded RNA genomes of approximately 9-11 kilobases. Viruses of all classified species infect arthropod hosts, with the majority infecting insects. Both beneficial and pest insects serve as hosts, and infections can be symptomless (Nilaparvatalugens honeydew virus 1)...
Article
Full-text available
Dicistroviridae is a family of small non-enveloped viruses with monopartite, linear, positive-sense RNA genomes of approximately 8–10 kb. Viruses of all classified species infect arthropod hosts, with some having devastating economic consequences, such as acute bee paralysis virus in domesticated honeybees and taura syndrome virus in shrimp farming...
Article
Invertebrates are hosts to diverse RNA viruses that have all possible types of encapsidated genomes (positive, negative and ambisense single stranded RNA genomes, or a double stranded RNA genome). These viruses also differ markedly in virion morphology and genome structure. Invertebrate RNA viruses are present in three out of four currently recogni...