Estefania Quenta

Estefania Quenta
Universidad Mayor de San Andres | UMSA

PhD in Life Sciences | Freshwater Ecology of the University of Tours

About

18
Publications
11,191
Reads
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223
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
221 Citations
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Introduction
My research is focussed on how freshwater ecosystems respond to the environmental changes by climate and human-related drivers of degradation on the biotic and physico-chemical characteristics of water in order to provide water conservation measures. I integrate methods from statistic, ecology, hydrology, geography, to investigate the impacts of climate change on freshwater ecosystems.

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Mountains play a crucial role for both the highlands and lowlands, but are particularly vulnerable to climate change and human interventions. This policy brief focuses on ecosystem restoration in the mountains. It highlights the role of healthy mountain ecosystems and their services and provides a set of recommendations to help design effective res...
Poster
Full-text available
In a context of increasing warming in the tropical Andes, the ecological structure of high-elevation streams might lose cold-adapted taxa and change to smaller populations.
Article
Full-text available
Although protected areas (PAs) play an important role in ecosystem conservation and climate change adaptation, no systematic information is available on PA protection of high-elevation freshwater ecosystems (e.g., lakes and watersheds with glaciers), their biodiversity and their ecosystem services in the tropical Andes. We therefore combined a lite...
Article
Full-text available
The cover image is based on the Original Article Aquatic biota responses to temperature in a high Andean geothermal stream, Estefania Quenta‐Herrera et al. https://doi.org/10.1111/fwb.13798.
Article
Full-text available
1) The impact of global warming on mountain ecosystems is predicted to be high, and particularly in the tropical region. Geothermal streams have provided comprehensive evidence about how aquatic biodiversity changes across natural thermal gradients, but current knowledge is restricted to arctic and temperate zones. Thermal tolerances are different...
Poster
Full-text available
The rapid melting of glacier cover is one of the most obvious impacts of climate change on alpine ecosystems and biodiversity. Our understanding of the impact of a decrease in glacier runoff on aquatic biodiversity is currently based on the “glacier-heterogeneity-diversity” paradigm, according to which there is high α-diversity at intermediate leve...
Article
Full-text available
River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to...
Article
Full-text available
River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to...
Article
Full-text available
River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to...
Article
Full-text available
River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the effects of temperature on prey–predator interactions is a key issue to predict the response of natural communities to climate change. Higher temperatures are expected to induce an increase in predation rates. However, little is known on how temperature influences close‐range encounter of prey–predator interactions, such as predato...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding metacommunity organisation in freshwater ecosystems is particularly important at high elevation in the tropical Andes, as this region is considered an important biodiversity hotspot with many endemic species threatened by climate change. High levels of dispersal at the regional scale and strong environmental filters at the local scale...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid melting of glacier cover is one of the most obvious impacts of climate change on alpine ecosystems and biodiversity. Our understanding of the impact of a decrease in glacier runoff on aquatic biodiversity is currently based on the glacier-heterogeneity-diversity' paradigm, according to which there is high -diversity at intermediate levels...
Article
Full-text available
Among the objectives of the BIOTHAW project, the aquatic ecology part aims at characterizing the organization of aquatic communities living in high Andean bofedales with regards to several environmental and social factors that are rapidly changing under climate change. In this paper we propose a methodological framework for the analysis of aquatic...

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