Erin K. Peck

Erin K. Peck
University of Delaware | UDel UD · Plant & Soil Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
846
Reads
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17
Citations
Introduction
I'm interested in source to sink sediment dynamics, sediment biogeochemistry, salt marsh morphodynamics, and short-lived radiometric dating.
Education
April 2017 - June 2021
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Ocean, Earth, & Atmospheric Sciences
September 2014 - April 2017
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Ocean, Earth, & Atmospheric Sciences
September 2010 - June 2014
Franklin and Marshall College
Field of study
  • Environmental Science & Geology

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
How milldams alter riparian hydrologic and groundwater mixing regimes is not well understood. Understanding the effects of milldams and their legacies on riparian hydrology is key to assessing riparian pollution buffering potential and for making appropriate watershed management decisions. We examined the spatiotemporal effects of milldams on groun...
Article
The majority of dams in the contiguous United States are small, low-head dams that are no longer operational but can influence the water quality of contemporary stream ecosystems. Potential effects of low-head dams on stream nitrogen removal (denitrification) have been rarely quantified, and yet they can be an important part of the decision-making...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary The last major earthquake along the Pacific Northwest (PNW) coast occurred in 1700, causing widespread destruction of salt marshes through elevation loss and burial by tsunami sand. In the ∼300 years following the earthquake, PNW salt marshes that were lost during the earthquake have reestablished; however, we are unsure of t...
Article
Riparian zones are key ecotones that buffer aquatic ecosystems through removal of nitrogen (N) via processes such as denitrification. However, how dams alter riparian N cycling and buffering capacity is poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that elevated groundwater and anoxia due to the back-up of stream water above milldams may enhance denitrifi...
Poster
Full-text available
The milldams and their ruins, constructed since the mid 1700s, are scattered all across the northeast United States. In the time since the installation of these dams large quantities of legacy sediment has accumulated behind these dams. The majority of research regarding dams focuses on the impacts of this legacy sediment on stream bed morphology....
Article
Full-text available
High‐latitude, coastal wetland biogeochemistry is dynamic in response to climate change, and yet we do not understand, and thus cannot fully predict, how crucial aspects of these systems will change in the future. Temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere have disproportionately increased 4°C in 30 years causing the rate of deglaciation to increase s...
Article
Spatiotemporal patterns of salt marsh lateral change vary along the Oregon coast, reflecting complex drivers of marsh morphodynamics. To identify potential factors influencing salt marsh expansion/contraction, time-series (∼10 y resolution over ∼80 y) of marsh edge position and area were measured from aerial imagery in five Oregon estuaries with va...
Article
Full-text available
Large storms can erode, transport, and deposit substantial amounts of particulate nitrogen (PN) in the fluvial network. The fate of this input and its consequence for water quality is poorly understood. This study investigated the transformation and leaching of PN using a 56-day incubation experiment with five PN sources: forest floor humus, upland...
Article
Full-text available
Dam removals are on the increase across the US with Pennsylvania currently leading the nation. While most dam removals are driven by aquatic habitat and public safety considerations, we know little about how dam removals impact water quality and riparian zone processes. Dam removals decrease the stream base level, which results in dewatering of the...
Article
Full-text available
X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning is used to study the physical characteristics of soil and sediment cores, allowing scientists to analyze stratigraphy without destroying core integrity. Microbiologists often work with geologists to understand the microbial properties in such cores; however, we do not know whether CT scanning alters microbial...
Article
Full-text available
Oregon estuaries provide important opportunities to assess controls on tidal saline wetland carbon burial and sediment accretion as both rates of relative sea level rise (RSLR; −1.4 ± 0.9 to 2.8 ± 0.8 mm yr−1) and fluvial suspended sediment load relative to estuary area (0.23 to 17 × 103 t km−2 yr−1) vary along the coast. We hypothesized that verti...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides the results of ecosystem restoration effectiveness monitoring conducted by our team during 2015-2017 at the Southern Flow Corridor Landowner Preferred Alternative (hereafter, "SFC") project site and reference sites. This report describes two main monitoring activities: 1) measurements of sediment accretion using feldspar marker...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report describes results from baseline monitoring of coastal “blue carbon” (carbon stored in soils of coastal wetlands), tidal hydrology (surface water level), surface water salinity, groundwater level, groundwater salinity, and vegetation composition at the Wallooskee-Youngs restoration site (referred to in this report as the “Wallooskee site...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report describes results from baseline monitoring of coastal “blue carbon” (carbon stored in soils of coastal wetlands) and channel morphology at the Wallooskee-­‐Youngs restoration site and reference sites in the Youngs Bay estuary. This work, conducted by the Estuary Technical Group (ETG) at the Institute for Applied Ecology, was funded thro...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
Examine soil characteristics upstream milldams laterally, vertically, and longitudinally.
Project
We have a new National Science Foundation (NSF) funded grant that will study the key conditions that regulate the DNRA-denitrification dichotomy and the production of ammonium-N in anoxic soils. The key hypotheses are: (a) hydrologic stagnation (low groundwater mixing) favors DNRA; (b) DNRA will increase (vis-à-vis denitrification) when specific concentration ratio for electron donors (organic C, ferrous iron, and sulfide) versus the electron acceptor (nitrate-N) is exceeded; and (c) salinization increases the concentrations of ammonium-N in riparian groundwater through - abiotic displacement of soil-sorbed ammonium-N, and salinity-driven release of ferrous and sulfide ions that stimulate DNRA. These controls will be evaluated through an innovative combination and integration of four independent, but complementary, approaches: (a) designed mesocosm factorial experiments that use 15N labeled nitrate-N to compare DNRA and denitrification process rates and factors involved; (b) in-situ measurements of riparian soil and water N at existing milldam study sites; (c) microbial quantification of DNRA genes (nrfA) in mesocosm and riparian soils; and (d) reactive transport modeling and calibration for laboratory mesocosm experiments followed with scaling up and testing for riparian sites.
Project
A new USDA-NIFA funded project will investigate how precolonial organic soils, buried below legacy sediments, can help recovery of nutrient processing and microbiomes in a stream and floodplain restoration project. The restoration removed the overlying legacy sediments, graded the previously incised stream banks, and reconnected the floodplain to the stream. We propose that soil health needs to be considered as an integral component of all floodplain, wetland and landscape restorations projects. The study site is described in this new publication - https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/12/8/2164