Erin Lee Martin

Erin Lee Martin
Monash University (Australia) · School of Earth, Atmosphere & Environment

Doctor of Philosophy - Geology
Research Associate

About

15
Publications
6,059
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
202
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
202 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Introduction
Supercontinents and the supercontinent cycle, biogeodynamics, big-data, tectonics, geochemistry Currently developing methods of automating data collection using Python programming language Curious about supercontinent coupled mantle dynamics, and feedbacks with tectonics and the distribution of ore deposits through space and time
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - March 2020
IGO
Position
  • Graduate Geologist
Description
  • Graduate underground mine geologist in a magmatic Ni sulphide deposit hosted in a mafic granulite terrane at IGO's Nova operation, responsible for daily operational activities including mapping and grade control.
June 2016 - November 2018
Curtin University
Position
  • Laboratory and Field Demonstrator
Description
  • Demonstrator for undergraduate courses in tectonics and field mapping.
March 2014 - present
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Position
  • Academic Assistant/Laboratory Demonstrator
Description
  • Lab Demonstrator: First Year Earth Science Second Year Optical Mineralogy Second Year Structural Geology
Education
January 2016 - February 2020
Curtin University
Field of study
  • Department of Applied Geology
March 2011 - November 2014

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Detrital zircons in Neoproterozoic–Paleozoic basins of the Pacific-Gondwana (PG) region contain a distinctive 700–500 Ma population conventionally considered to be derived from Antarctica. However, the 700–600 Ma age component of the population predates major peripheral orogenesis (Terra Australis orogen), which began at ca. 580 Ma, and the highly...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents a resource for automated search, extraction and collation of geochemical and geochronological data from the Figshare repository using web scraping code. To answer fundamental questions about the Earth’s evolution, such as spatial and temporal evolution and interrelationships between the planet’s solid and surficial reservoirs,...
Article
Full-text available
New and compiled detrital zircon U–Pb ages from the southern Neoproterozoic-Cambrian Ribeira Belt, SE Brazil, demonstrate Laurentian affinity of the Embu Terrane which is statistically distinct from the adjoining Apiaí and São Roque terranes with cratonic affinity (e.g., São Francisco Craton). Zircon provenance results indicate that the type-area o...
Article
Full-text available
After its Ediacaran-Early Cambrian assembly, Gondwana was flanked by a system of peripheral orogens, Terra Australis, Avalonian-Cadomian and newly defined North Indo-Australie, which display broad temporal correlations of their lithotectonic records. Prior to assembly, their initial histories were primarily controlled by the early Neoproterozoic br...
Article
Long-lived (800 Ma) Paleo– to Mesoproterozoic accretionary orogens on the margins of Laurentia, Baltica, Amazonia, and Kalahari collided to form the core of the supercontinent, Rodinia. Accretionary orogens in Laurentia and Baltica record predominately radiogenic zircon εHf(t) and whole-rock Pb isotopic compositions, short crustal residence times (...
Article
Full-text available
We present the first regional in-situ zircon U–Pb–Hf isotopic data from metaigneous and metasedimentary rocks from the Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic Rio Apa Terrane (RAT), a crustal fragment outcropping in the central-western Brazil and north-eastern Paraguay. These new ages and Hf isotopic data delineate three magmatic events, which record the constru...
Article
Full-text available
The proto-Andean margin of Argentina consists of several suspect terranes, the origins of which are disputed. The Cuyania (greater Precordillera) suspect terrane was originally interpreted to be of southeast Laurentian affinity, but more recently a southwestern Gondwanan provenance has been argued. Both potential source regions comprise Mesoprotero...
Article
Sedimentary exchanges across continents during the collisional assembly and lifespan of supercontinents provide a powerful way of testing the assembling process and configuration of supercontinents. The Ord Basin in north-western Australia contains mid-Cambrian shallow marine and deltaic sedimentary successions that post-date the ca. 650–520 Ma Pat...
Article
Full-text available
The metamorphic core of the Himalaya is composed of Indian cratonic rocks with two distinct crustal affinities that are defined by radiogenic isotopic geochemistry and detrital zircon age spectra. One is derived predominantly from the Paleoproterozoic and Archean rocks of the Indian cratonic interior and is either represented as metamorphosed sedim...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Ordovician to Neogene sediments of east Australia contain an anomalous Late Neoproterozoic zircon population that cannot be attributed to any local source rocks. The origin of these Pacific-Gondwana (PG) zircons is contentious, with the population extending from 650 to 550 Ma, pre-dating the earliest Terra-Australis magmatism. Most authors propose...
Conference Paper
It has become apparent that the Earth can be divided into two convective mantle supercells in the Phanerozoic, but it is not clear when or why they began. The boundary of the supercells is marked by the position of the circum-Pacific subduction system, which is a semi-hemispheric belt that separates an exclusively oceanic cell from the other which...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Supercontinent-coupled mantle dynamics are thought to reflect complex feedbacks between supercontinent assembly, mantle insulation and convection, supercontinent break-up, and mantle reorganization. This project investigates the evolution of supercontinents in the context of mantle dynamics; the influence of supercontinents on mantle conditions; and geological record of the degree-1 and degree-2 spherical harmonic planforms
Project
It is argued that long-term mantle circulation is the ultimate driver of supercontinent cycles, however, our understanding of mantle circulation in deep time is limited. Significant advances in palaeogeography, palaeomagnetic reconstructions, seismic tomography and 4D modelling have highlighted that plate kinematic evolution and mantle circulation are fundamentally linked. Slab pull is a major driver of plate tectonics, therefore, identifying the location of magmatic arcs and their underlying subduction zones is essential for understanding plate kinematics. The purpose of this study is to identify the geodynamic drivers of the Rodinia to Gondwana supercontinent cycle by investigating isotopic trends of global Neoproterozoic-Cambrian orogens. Plate tectonic motion for the Neoproterozoic will be reconstructed using the location and longevity of magmatic arcs (and hence the location and duration of subducting slabs) revealed by Lu-Hf systematics. This project has two major components, the first involves field work in two key regions in Rodinia-Gondwana reconstructions, the Brasiliano Orogens of South America and the Paterson and Pinjarra Orogens of Western Australia. The second component involves compilation of a global database of georeferenced U-Pb and Lu-Hf data from published sources. This will allow detailed global plate reconstructions to be evaluated for the Neoproterozoic in light of the Lu-Hf data. Finally, an assessment can be made as to whether simple mantle circulation patterns drove the Neoproterozoic supercontinent cycle, as is proposed for the Phanerozoic.