Erin Marie S Williams-Hatala

Erin Marie S Williams-Hatala
Chatham University · Program in Biology

PhD

About

21
Publications
3,293
Reads
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332
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
254 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202301020304050
201720182019202020212022202301020304050
201720182019202020212022202301020304050
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - March 2019
Chatham University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Past studies have hypothesized that aspects of hominin upper limb morphology are linked to the ability to produce stone tools. However, we lack the data on upper limb motions needed to evaluate the biomechanical context of stone tool production. This study seeks to better understand the biomechanics of stone tool-making by investigating upper limb...
Article
Full-text available
Muscle attachment sites (entheses) on dry bones are regularly used by paleontologists to infer soft tissue anatomy and to reconstruct behaviors of extinct organisms. This method is commonly applied to fossil hominin hand bones to assess their abilities to participate in Paleolithic stone tool behaviors. Little is known, however, about how or even w...
Article
The modern human hand is an intriguing mix of primitive morphology and derived function. Traditionally, its form and function are explained as a functional “trade‐off” between the requirements of locomotion and manipulation, but recently acquired comparative, experimental and fossil evidence suggests that this functional trade‐off is more complex t...
Article
Full-text available
Bipedal trackways discovered in 1978 at Laetoli site G, Tanzania and dated to 3.66 million years ago are widely accepted as the oldest unequivocal evidence of obligate bipedalism in the human lineage 1–3 . Another trackway discovered two years earlier at nearby site A was partially excavated and attributed to a hominin, but curious affinities with...
Article
Objectives As is the case among many complex motor tasks that require prolonged practice before achieving expertise, aspects of the biomechanics of knapping vary according to the relative experience/skill level of the practitioner. In archaeological experiments focused on the production of Plio‐Pleistocene stone tools, these skill‐mediated biomecha...
Article
American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) membership surveys from 1996 and 1998 revealed significant gender disparities in academic status. A 2014 follow-up survey showed that gender equality had improved, particularly with respect to the number of women in tenure-stream positions. However, although women comprised 70% of AAPA members...
Article
It is widely agreed that biomechanical stresses imposed by stone tool behaviors influenced the evolution of the human hand. Though archaeological evidence suggests that early hominins participated in a variety of tool behaviors, it is unlikely that all behaviors equally influenced modern human hand anatomy. It is more probable that a behavior's lik...
Preprint
American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) membership surveys from 1996 and 1998 revealed significant gender disparities in academic status. A 2014 follow-up survey showed that gender equality had improved, particularly with respect to the number of women in tenure-stream positions. However, although women comprised 70% of AAPA members...
Chapter
Evolution is a contextually driven process, meaning that the form of a feature in its present state is the synthesis of the ancestral form and function, the present function and biological role, and the ecology of the organism (Bock and von Wahlert 1965). Free of this context, features cease to convey their significance to the life of an organism,...

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