Erin Elizabeth Kane

Erin Elizabeth Kane
Boston University | BU · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

26
Publications
5,446
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145
Citations
Introduction
Erin Kane is a postdoctoral research associate in Boston Unviersity's Department of Anthropology. She studies primate behavioral ecology, endocrinology, and feeding behavior in guenons and orangutans.

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Establishing dietary central tendencies and extremes remains an important goal of primate research. While habitat differences and spatial discontinuity are well-documented contributors to dietary variation, other factors including polyspecific associations may significantly impact diet through changes in strata use and/or increased feeding competit...
Article
Full-text available
Polyspecific associations occur when species overlap in their environment by chance, converge at common resources, or in response to predation pressure. However, because larger groups may themselves attract the attention of predators, species forming associations must balance the costs and benefits of comingling. Experimental and observational rese...
Article
Primates are hypothesized to "fall back" on challenging-to-process foods when preferred foods are less available. Such dietary shifts may be accompanied by changes in oral processing behavior argued to be selectively important. Here, we examine the oral processing behavior of Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) in the Taï Forest across their dietar...
Article
The Gunung Palung Orangutan Project has conducted research on critically endangered wild Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) since 1994 in Gunung Palung National Park, West Kalimantan, Indonesia. A major goal of our broad-ranging research on orangutan behavior and ecology is to understand how the unique rainforest environment of Southeast A...
Article
Ecologists and conservation biologists conducting long-term research programs in the tropics must confront serious ethical challenges that revolve around economic inequalities, cultural differences, supporting the local communities as much as possible, and sharing the knowledge produced by the research. In this collective article, researchers share...
Chapter
Laboratory methods are increasingly being used in remote field camps, or during mobile field surveys, to aid in wildlife conservation. This chapter explains how field laboratories have allowed for technological advances in sample preparation and preservation, and for both low and high-tech on-site analysis. It highlights how field samples can be us...
Article
Full-text available
Reconstructing diet is critical to understanding hominin adaptations. Isotopic and functional morphological analyses of early hominins are compatible with consumption of hard foods, such as mechanically-protected seeds, but dental microwear analyses are not. The protective shells surrounding seeds are thought to induce complex enamel surface textur...
Chapter
Galbany J, Twahirwa JC, Baiges-Sotos L, Kane EE, Tuyisingize D, Kaleme P, Rwetsiba A, Bitariho R, Cranfield MR, Bromage TG, Mudakikwa A, Stoinski TS, Robbins MM, McFarlin SC (2020) Dental macrowear in catarrhine primates: variability across species. In: Schmidt C & Watson JT (Eds.) Dental wear in evolutionary and biocultural contexts. Pp. 11-37. El...
Poster
Full-text available
While cranial features have limited discriminatory power within Cercopithecus, dental features sort guenon species better. If similar cranial features reflect comparable functional performance, do guenons display broadly similar oral processing behaviors despite distinctive diets?
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: We previously found that differing degrees of forelimb flexion, elevation, and abduction during nonlocomotor foraging activities covaried with scapular morphology among four sympatric cercopithecids. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether features of the proximal humerus are similarly related to forelimb elevation during f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Field studies have shown that locomotor profiles of several primate taxa do not differ in groups inhabiting structurally distinct habitats; however, the extent that posture may be similarly conserved remains lesser known. Our previous research demonstrated that several cercopithecid taxa differed significantly in their use of forelimb movements dur...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Temporal and spatial characteristics of primate foods significantly impact female sociality. Food site residence time is a consequence of these ecological characteristics: foods with longer residence times tend to be readily monopolizeable, have clumped distributions, and elicit greater competition. For example, among arboreal mangabeys, patches of...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying the nutritional composition of food items has significant ramifications for primate feeding ecology, which, in turn, influences investigations of primate sociality, cognition, and conservation. The aim of our study was to analyze water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) concentrations in the leaves of trees common to the Diani Forest of Kenya....
Article
Full-text available
Most investigations of primate scapular morphology use differences in locomotion to explain variation; less is known about how scapular geometry covaries with nonlocomotor behavior. We examined forelimb use during foraging in 4 cercopithecids ranging throughout the Ivory Coast's Tai Forest. During 5-min feeding bouts, we recorded the frequency indi...
Article
Full-text available
While primate trapping is a widely used field methodology, there are substantial health, safety and social risks to handling wild primates, necessitating sharing of best-practice methods to minimize such risks. Yet, comprehensive capture-and-release protocols are rarely published, and updated even less frequently, despite advances that significantl...
Article
Full-text available
We collected frequency data on oral processing behaviors during feeding in habituated groups of Western red colobus, Piliocolobus badius, and Western black and white, Colobus polykomos, ranging in the Ivory Coast's Tai National Park. During the sampling period, the diet of red colobus consisted of approximately 75% leaves compared to approximately...
Article
A fruit-bearing tree from West Africa, Sacoglottis gabonensis, is used in cultural medicine to treat fever, diarrhea, infections, hypertension, and diabetes.1 The fleshy fruit encases a woody seed containing 2 – 5 waxy nuts. Despite the seed's resistance to cracking, these nuts comprise 50 – 60% of the diet of sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys), a p...
Article
Sacoglottis gabonensis is a red brown tree, and only African representative of the Humiriaceae. The tree grows in wet, swampy areas of humid forest along the coastal region of west-central Africa. Tree products are used as food, building materials, and in traditional medicine by local peoples. For example, bark extract is used to treat ailments suc...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
My dissertation project assesses the socioecology, stress, and reproduction of female Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) in Côte d’Ivoire’s Taï National Park.