Erin Horn

Erin Horn
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

PhD student in Civil & Environmental Engineering

About

8
Publications
1,499
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
Erin Horn is a PhD student in the Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington researching aquaponics, resource recovery, regenerative built environments, and systems theory and assessment for the Circular City. As a research associate in the Circular City + Living Systems Lab (CCLS), she is part of CITYFOOD- an international transdisciplinary research collaboration investigating potential for the multi-scalar urban integration of aquaponics.
Education
September 2018 - June 2020
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Civil & Environmental Engineering
September 2014 - June 2018
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Microbiology

Publications

Publications (8)
Conference Paper
Green and healthy building certification systems increasingly motivate stakeholder decision making and serve as influential guides for sustainable design and construction. These codes promote water-use efficiency through measures such as low-flow features and rainwater reuse. Health-oriented guidelines like WELL particularly emphasize water quality...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
By 2050, two-thirds of the world's population will live in cities and consume 80% of the global food supply. As the changing climate exacerbates pressure on all sectors of the economy, new frameworks for resource management in urban areas have been introduced. The food-water-energy nexus and the circular economy are two prominent examples; these co...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This research collaboration between the Circular City + Living Systems (CCLS) research lab and the architecture practice Weber Thompson addresses the intersection of three critical topics affecting the carbon footprint of the built environment: adaptive reuse of existing buildings, increased availability of electric and autonomous vehicles, and foo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Energy use within buildings contributes to nearly a third of carbon emissions in the United States (Zhang et al. 2019, EPA). Meanwhile, between 30-40% of food in the U.S. is wasted and generates carbon emissions equivalent to that of 37 million cars yearly (UN FAO). Long term decarbonization strategies within the built environment can look to alter...
Article
Full-text available
Growing in popularity, the circular city framework is at the leading-edge of a larger and older transitional dialogue which envisions regenerative, circular, and symbiotic systems as the future of urban sustainability. The need for more research supporting the implementation of such concepts has been often noted in literature. To help address this...
Poster
Full-text available
A preliminary literature and policy review of the key water quality concerns in premise plumbing, particularly low-flow systems, and a comparison the respective influence of sustainable and healthy building certification systems on water usage and quality. We suggest areas for further research and technology development and identify industry releva...
Article
Full-text available
Most plant-pollinator interactions occur during specific periods during the day. To facilitate these interactions, many flowers are known to display their attractive qualities, such as scent emission and petal opening, in a daily rhythmic fashion. However, less is known about how the internal timing mechanisms (the circadian clocks) of plants and a...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Green and Healthy Building certification systems increasingly motivate stakeholder decision making and serve as influential guides for sustainable design and construction. These codes promote water-use efficiency through measures such as low-flow features and rainwater reuse. Health-oriented guidelines such as WELL particularly emphasize water quality. However, reduced flow and increased water age can produce a variety of negative water quality outcomes, posing occupant health risks including increased opportunistic pathogen growth in premise plumbing systems. The goal of this project is to: assess the standing research and assessment of water age/quality and microbial concerns in low-flow systems; compare the current and potential role of Green/Healthy Building codes and certification programs in effecting in-building water quality outcomes; and summarize recent studies and efforts toward policy assessment and effective planning to improve coordination and close design-quality outcome gaps, assessed for their applicability toward in-building water quality and safety.
Project
The international project CITYFOOD aims to address a range of scientific, environmental, and social questions regarding supply chain optimization, resource use efficiency, food safety and regulatory acceptance of integrated aquaponics as a sustainable form of food production to meet a growing population. The CITYFOOD collaboration will explore the potential of aquaponic systems for urban applications. Emergent aquaponic systems save energy, water and nutrients by combining contained recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) with hydroponic plant production. See more here: https://cityfood-aquaponics.com