Erin Buchholtz

Erin Buchholtz
USGS - South Carolina Cooperative Research Unit · Wildlife

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
8,454
Reads
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164
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
164 Citations
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Introduction
I am passionate about the interdisciplinary challenges of conservation and management in the US and abroad, with a focus on landscape ecology approaches. I have experience with field ecology and research, spatial analysis and mapping using both ESRI and open-source GIS like QGIS, programming in R, remote sensing, international community development, and project management. I have also worked on collaborative, multidisciplinary teams for conservation.
Additional affiliations
May 2022 - present
Clemson University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
September 2014 - December 2019
Texas A&M University
Field of study
  • Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
August 2007 - May 2011
Princeton University
Field of study
  • Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Human-wildlife conflict has serious conservation consequences, both for populations of wildlife and for the people who live alongside them. Connectivity analyses can incorporate species-specific landscape resistance, and therefore have the potential to be used to understand where wildlife moves and causes conflict with people. We used circuit theor...
Article
Maintaining or restoring connectivity among wildlife populations is a primary strategy to overcome the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation. Yet, current connectivity planning efforts typically assess landscape resistance, the ability of organisms to cross various biophysical elements in a landscape, while overlooking the various ways in which...
Article
Expansion of human settlements and development have undeniable impacts on wildlife and habitats. Yet wildlife continues to persist in human-modified environments. While shifting patterns of wildlife landscape use in response to development is well established, less is known about how risk avoidance by animals impacts their resource access. Our rese...
Article
Full-text available
Species range contractions both contribute to, and result from, biological annihilation, yet do not receive the same attention as extinctions. Range contractions can lead to marked impacts on populations but are usually characterized only by reduction in extent of range. For effective conservation, it is critical to recognize that not all range con...
Article
Full-text available
The spatial patterns and context of invasions are increasingly recognized as important for successful and efficient management actions. Beyond mapping occurrence or percent cover in pixels, spatial summary information that describes the size and arrangement of patches in the context of a larger landscape (e.g., infested regions, connected patch net...
Article
Full-text available
Context Anticipating where an invasive species could become abundant can help guide prevention and control efforts aimed at reducing invasion impacts. Information on potential abundance can be combined with information on the current status of an invasion to guide management towards currently uninvaded locations where the threat of invasion is high...
Preprint
Full-text available
Species range contractions both contribute to, and result from, biological annihilation, yet do not receive the same attention as extinctions. Range contractions can lead to marked impacts on populations but are usually characterized only by reduction in extent of range. For effective conservation, it is critical to recognize that not all range con...
Article
Conceptual context Wildlife crop consumption is a worldwide problem. This paper builds on the theoretical framework of profit and utility maximization from economics as established in the theory of optimal foraging, bringing this perspective to the issue of wildlife crop consumption by testing whether elephants forage for crops in an optimal way....
Preprint
Full-text available
Species range contractions are important contributors to biological annihilation, yet typically do not receive the same attention as extinctions. Range contractions can lead to marked impacts on populations but are often only characterized by measurements of reduced extent. For effective conservation efforts, it is critical to recognize that not al...
Article
Local ecological knowledge (LEK) has been increasingly invoked in biodiversity monitoring and conservation efforts. Although methods involving LEK have become more widespread in ecology, it remains an undervalued source of information in understanding the ecology of wildlife in the context of human-wildlife conflict. People who regularly interact w...
Article
Full-text available
Context Many wildlife populations exist outside of protected areas, and it is necessary to understand how these animals use a landscape mosaic that includes humans. Patterns of landscape use in space and time can help inform strategies to mitigate negative interactions between people and wildlife. Objectives We aimed to estimate the landscape util...
Article
Full-text available
In social-ecological systems around the world, human-wildlife interactions are on the rise, often with negative consequences. This problem is particularly salient in areas where populations of humans and wildlife are increasing and share limited space and resources. However, few studies look at how both people and wildlife navigate shared spaces. T...
Article
Full-text available
In an increasingly interconnected world, human-environment interactions involving flows of people, organisms, goods, information, and energy are expanding in magnitude and extent, often over long distances. As a universal paradigm for examining these interactions, the telecoupling framework (published in 2013) has been broadly implemented across th...
Chapter
The future for the Reptilia will be one of continued discovery of the extant diversity of species in every group and continued challenges for their conservation. Most species will persist, albeit in smaller and increasingly fragmented geographic ranges, and highly vulnerable species will require active conservation measures to ensure their survival...

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Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Elephant movement and human-elephant interactions in the Okavango Panhandle, Botswana