Erika Juhász

Erika Juhász
Centre for Ecological Research

Master of Science

About

9
Publications
2,363
Reads
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29
Citations
Citations since 2017
9 Research Items
29 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810
Additional affiliations
September 2021 - present
Centre for Ecological Research Hungary
Position
  • Fellow

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
Conflicts caused by reintroduced native species are increasing; however, there is a knowledge gap concerning ecological knowledge and perception of local community members regarding the impact of these species on local ecosystem services and livelihoods. We studied local knowledge about beavers and the perception of their impact on ecosystem servic...
Article
Full-text available
Species reintroductions aim to re-establish populations of locally extinct, often keystone species. As a consequence of the reintroduction and protection of the Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber), the species has recolonized the suitable habitats (including floodplains) across Europe in the past few decades. Floodplain habitats have already been signif...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A 2020 tavaszán kitört koronavírus járvány miatt lehetetlenné vált több szakmai konferencia megtartása, éppúgy, mint a nagyközönség számára is nyitott, tudománynépszerűsítő előadások megvalósítása. Erre a helyzetre válaszul, a személyes találkozást igénylő hagyományos konferenciák alternatívájaként hoztuk létre az Online Biológia Konferencia nevű k...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the knowledge of local nature conservationists and researchers associated with the Eurasian beaver through interviews. In the first part of our study (Juhász et al. 2019), we reported the spread of the beaver, recognisable beaver signs, possibilities of human-beaver coexistence and causes of mortality. In the second part (present paper)...
Article
Full-text available
1. Herbivore species can either hinder or accelerate the invasion of woody species through selective utilization. Therefore, an exploration of foraging decisions can contribute to the understanding and forecasting of woody plant invasions. Despite the large distribution range and rapidly growing abundance of beaver species across the Northern Hemis...
Article
Full-text available
Aerial surveys have always significantly contributed to the accurate mapping of certain geographical phenomena. Remote sensing opened up new perspectives in nature monitoring with state-of-the-art technical solutions using modern onboard recording equipment. We developed the technical background and the methodology that supports detailed and cost-e...
Article
Full-text available
In the last few decades, the Eurasian beaver has been successfully and quickly colonizing suitable habitats throughout Europe, thus in Hungary as well. Despite its importance, monitoring the species’ distribution and population size received little attention on the southern part of the Great Hungarian Plain. This paper presents a field survey focus...
Article
Full-text available
Local ecological knowledge of the nutrition of and the use of woody species by the Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber) was studied in three regions of the Carpathian Basin: Kászon Basin (Romania), Szigetköz and Mura River region (Hungary). Local understanding on alimentary habits, lifestyle and woody species usage were collected from 90 informants by st...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
https://ecolres.hu/en/node/13169 Ecological studies rarely utilize the oral historical knowledge of local inhabitants to understand vegetation dynamics and driver-vegetation interactions. Our main objective is to assess the impact of interacting indirect (e.g., social and economic) and direct (e.g., land-use change, invasive species) drivers on vegetation change using local and traditional ecological knowledge as a data source of past vegetation status and trends. By conducting oral history interviews with the DPSIR (Driving forces–Pressures–States–Impacts–Responses) framework, we aim to analyse the complexity of driver-vegetation interactions at fine spatial and longer-term temporal scales. Our additional objective is to develop a new approach for fine-scale landscape historical analysis that is based on oral history interviewing using in-door and out-door interviews. Local case studies will provide a deeper insight on local vegetation dynamics, while the multilocal regional analysis will help find general patterns and grasp the diversity of local driver-vegetation change interactions. At local scale, we will focus on encroachment (esp. with oaks), a process that is regarded both as a threat by overgrowing species-rich grasslands and as an opportunity for the development of semi-natural oak forests. Multi-scale analysis of drivers of vegetation change in geographically distant areas with similar ecological features at the decades scale are rare. By expanding our research to two non-European study sites (Iran, Mongolia), involving foreign PhD students, we will identify globally acting drivers of local vegetation change, and broaden the spatial and temporal scales of our understanding.
Project
Fine-scale forage selection surveys are managed in several different habitat types, along large rivers and smaller watercourses in Hungary. The main objective of this study is to understand the beaver's impact on the species composition and the vegetation structure. For a deeper understanding of ecological and conservation biological consequences of the species' return to Hungary, structured and semi-structured interviews are conducted with expert informants (e.g. conservationists, water management professionals, and scientists) and with local people. Field surveys on the beaver-dam caused landscape changes are also planned in the future.
Project
This project aims to estimate the current population size of the species in Hungary. Our main methods are field monitoring of fresh beaver signs and citizen science data collection.