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Erika Guttmann-Bond

Erika Guttmann-Bond

PhD
Archaeology and Soil Micromorphology

About

34
Publications
11,748
Reads
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346
Citations
Introduction
Freelance archaeology and geoarchaeology. Soil micromorphology. Post excavation through to publication. guttmann.bond@gmail.com
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - February 2016
University of Wales Trinity Saint David
Position
  • Senior Lecturer
September 2009 - December 2012
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor (Full)
Description
  • Assistant Director of the Institute for Geo- and Bioarchaeology
September 2006 - July 2009
Cardiff University
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 1997 - November 2001
University of Stirling
Field of study
  • Archaeology, Geoarchaeology, Prehistoric agriculture

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
The arable soils from two multiperiod settlements were analyzed to identify changes in agricultural methods over time. The settlement middens were also analyzed to determine whether potential fertilizers were discarded unused. Results suggest that in the Neolithic period (~4000–2000 B.C. in the UK) the arable soils at Tofts Ness, Orkney, and Old Sc...
Article
Full-text available
There has been much interest in the failures of the past and the environmental disasters that ensued because of poor land management practices. I argue that the successes of the past are of equal importance, and this is increasingly recognized as early agricultural techniques are rediscovered and reinstated. Some of these systems are not only more...
Article
Full-text available
The connections between agriculture and landscape are well established in western perceptions. Agricultural landscapes in the Western world have, however, become increasingly industrialised and low in biodiversity, and the standard practice in developed countries is to grow large fields of single crops sprayed with pesticides and herbicides. Many l...
Article
Full-text available
The Céide Fields, Belderrig, and Rathlackan are extensive early Neolithic field systems in County Mayo, Republic of Ireland. The Céide Fields are thought to be the earliest field systems in Europe, and as such they are listed as a potential World Heritage site. For this project, the buried soils of the 3 sites were analyzed in order to determine th...
Book
Many books have been written about the failures of the past, but this is an optimistic book that focuses on past successes. I am particularly interested in how these successes can be reintroduced or reinvented. For example: archaeologists have discovered complex systems for the collection and storage of rainwater for agriculture in the desert, and...
Technical Report
Thin section analysis of two Bronze Age barrows on the North York Moors. Commissioned by Wessex Archaeology. Not in the public domain until full publication of the project.
Technical Report
Thin section analysis of a burnt mound. Not in the public domain until the completed project is published. Commissioned by Wessex Archaeology.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Geoarchaeological technical report on boreholes drilled at Meridian Works, upper Lea Valley, London.
Article
The ethics of sustainable archaeology - Volume 93 Issue 372 - Erika Guttmann-Bond
Article
Full-text available
Excavations at the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B ritual site of Naḥal Roded 110 in the Southern Negev, Israel, have revealed evidence—unique to this region—for on-site flint knapping and abundant raptor remains. Full text available at: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/investigations-at-nahal-roded-110-a-late-neolithic-ritual-sit...
Research
Full-text available
Penyrheol interim report. Excavation of a Welsh Iron Age enclosure, including a round house and 1st century pottery.
Article
Full-text available
Agricultural terraces are geomorphologic features created by humans. These structures protect farming land by reducing soil erosion, they collect water in their hydrological infrastructure, and preserve crops and vegetation. Their construction could however negatively affect underlying soils and archaeology present in those soils. However, if a ter...
Book
Full-text available
Researchers in landscape archaeology use two different definitions of landscape. One definition (landscape as territory) is used by the processual archaeologists, earth scientists, and most historical geographers within this volume. By contrast, post-processual archaeologists, new cultural geographers and anthropologists favour a more abstract defi...
Article
Full-text available
Plaggen soils are man-made agricultural soils which were created in historical times by using peat or turf as animal bedding. This bedding was then spread onto fields to create a rich and unusually deep topsoil. The plaggen system was used in Northern Europe from the Middle Ages up to, in some cases, the 1960s. Plaggen soils can be difficult to dis...
Article
Full-text available
The soils surrounding three Iron Age settlements on South Mainland, Shetland, were sampled and compared for indicators of soil amendment. Two of the sites (Old Scatness and Jarlshof) were on lower-lying, better-drained, sheltered land; the third (Clevigarth) was in an acid, exposed environment at a higher elevation. The hypothesis, based on previou...
Article
Full-text available
The creation of anthropic sediments, traditionally referred to under the blanket term midden, through the utilization of settlement waste materials in domestic settlement construction was first recognized during early excavations at the Orcadian Neolithic site of Skara Brae (V.G. Childe, 1931a; 1931b). Prior to the present study there has been no s...
Article
Full-text available
The examination of eroding coastal dunes at the prehistoric site of Northton, Harris, has produced the first archaeological evidence of Mesolithic activity in the Western Isles in the form of two midden-related deposits. The first phase of Mesolithic activity is dated to 7060-6650 cal. Bc based on AMS dating of charred hazelnut shells. This discove...
Article
Full-text available
This paper summarizes some of the geoarchaeological evidence for early arable agriculture in Britain and Europe, and introduces new evidence for small-scale but very intensive cultivation in the Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age in Scotland. The Scottish examples demonstrate that, from the Neolithic to the Iron Age, midden heaps were sometimes plo...
Article
Full-text available
A Neolithic agricultural soil, a late Bronze Age to early Iron Age soil and a range of midden deposits were analysed from the multi-period settlement sites of Tofts Ness, Sanday, Orkney and Old Scatness, Shetland. The analysis was undertaken in order to compare the midden material which had accumulated within the settlement to the cultural material...
Article
Full-text available
Excavations on the multi-period settlement at Old Scatness, Shetland have uncovered a number of Iron Age structures with compacted, floor-like layers. Thin section analysis was undertaken in order to investigate and compare the characteristics of these layers. The investigation also draws on earlier analyses of the Iron Age agricultural soil around...
Article
Summary An archaeological excavation was carried out by Humber Field Archaeology at the site of the former steelworks at Normanby Park, near Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire. Archaeological remains of significance were encountered in the trenches in the vicinity of a medieval moated manorial site. Twenty-five sediment samples, together with nine colu...
Article
Full-text available
A 2.5 ha open area excavation at South Hornchurch, Essex (London Borough of Havering) has revealed an extensive hate Bronze Age settlement on the Thames terrace gravels. The site is particularly significant because of the association of a circular ditched enclosure or ringwork with a contemporary field system, as well as clusters of enclosed and un...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
This is from an archaeological deposit on a floodplain, and I'm wondering if it's vivianite? It doesn't have the usual structure to it. The photo is at 400x magnification in PPL.
Question
I can find very general maps showing the tidal extent in the Thames, but does saline water also travel up its tributaries? Can anyone send me or link me to a map showing the extent of estuarine influence (i.e. salinity) in the tributaries of the Thames in greater London?
I can't access the National Library just now, due to Covid.

Network

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
There have been many books written about what we can learn from the failures of the past, but I want to take a more optimistic view, focussing on what we have to learn from past successes. This book is about sustainable agriculture and architecture in the past, and the engineering works that supported them, but it also looks to the future. Ancient technologies are what engineers define as ‘intermediate’, which means that they are often simple, low in cost and they depend on local materials. Significantly, they don’t require fossil fuels. There is a lot that we in the West can learn from the past and from developing countries where people still practice traditional agriculture, and there is now broad agreement among many governments, non-government organisations, engineers and agronomists, as well as the United Nations, that intermediate technologies are often the most appropriate way forward in developing countries. The New Green Revolution is looking to traditional knowledge to solve problems of decreasing yields and environmental impoverishment, rather than to technology that is dependent on the diminishing resource of fossil fuels. This subject is controversial and I have been accused of suggesting ‘pie in the sky’ ideas, but the re-introductions I’m suggesting are already being carried out in countries all over the world. Water harvesting and other dryland systems are being re-introduced in Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Pakistan, Syria, Tunisia, Yemen, Afghanistan and Oman. Other early technologies are being put back to work in Peru, Bolivia, India, Bangladesh, Niger, Burkina Faso and many more. I would like to raise awareness of the fact that we already have the technology to make sweeping improvements to the way that we grow food and manage the environment; we could be producing more food per hectare, and we could be doing it more sustainably. I introduce many case studies of successful reintroductions that demonstrate how this can be done. These studies demonstrate that sustainable agriculture is often not only cheaper than industrialised agriculture, but it is also more productive per hectare. As the climate changes, it is imperative that we come up with new ways of managing our environment. Deserts are spreading, wetlands will expand as the sea level rises, and we need to find ways to cope with a growing population. Climate change is increasing the severity of storms, and I discuss the varieties of vernacular architecture that are better suited to withstanding storms and other extreme conditions. I am not advocating a wholesale return to past technologies, nor am I suggesting the adoption of early technology in place of modern engineering and agriculture. What I am suggesting is that we combine some aspects of early technology with new systems and inventions such as solar energy, to create a healthier, more sustainable and environmentally richer planet.