Erik H Poelman

Erik H Poelman
Wageningen University & Research | WUR · Department of Entomology

Professor

About

143
Publications
47,126
Reads
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4,942
Citations
Citations since 2016
84 Research Items
3433 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600

Publications

Publications (143)
Article
Full-text available
Polyphagous insects often show specialization in feeding on different host plants in terms of survival and growth and, therefore, can be considered minor or major pests of particular hosts. Whether polyphagous insects employ a common transcriptional response to cope with defenses from diverse host plants is under‐studied. We focused on patterns of...
Article
Full-text available
1. Upon parasitism, many parasitoids inject symbiotic viruses and venom into their host. Thereby, they modify the hosts physiology including its saliva composition and, in turn, plant perception of herbivory. 2. It has been hypothesised that parasitoids manipulate plant responses to increase their host performance and maximise their own fitness. Ho...
Article
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Tritrophic interactions among plants, herbivorous insects and their parasitoids have been well studied in the past four decades. Recently, a new angle has been uncovered: koinobiont parasitoids, that allow their host to keep feeding on the plant for a certain amount of time after parasitism, indirectly alter plant responses against herbivory via th...
Article
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Generalist predators are increasingly used in biological pest control for greenhouse crops, as they control multiple pests and persist in crops even when prey is scarce. However, some of these predators may cause plant damage due to their omnivorous feeding behaviour. In many European regions, the omnivorous predator Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) (H...
Article
Plants may effectively tailor defenses by recognizing their attackers and reprogramming their physiology. Although most plants are under attack by a large diversity of herbivores, surprisingly little is known about the physiological capabilities of plants to deal with attack by multiple herbivores. Studies on dual herbivore attack identified that d...
Article
Hyperparasitoids are some of the most diverse members of insect food webs. True hyperparasitoids parasitize the larvae of other parasitoids, reaching these larvae with their ovipositor through the herbivore that hosts the parasitoid larva. During pupation, primary parasitoids also may be attacked by pseudohyperparasitoids that lay their eggs on the...
Article
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In nature, plants interact with multiple insect herbivores that may arrive simultaneously or sequentially. There is extensive knowledge on how plants defend themselves against single or dual attack. However, we lack information on how plants defend against the attack of multiple herbivores that arrive sequentially. In this study, we investigated wh...
Article
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The phenotypic plasticity of flowering plants in response to herbivore damage to vegetative tissues can affect plant interactions with flower‐feeding organisms. Such induced systemic responses are probably regulated by defence‐related phytohormones that signal flowers to alter secondary chemistry that affects resistance to florivores. Current knowl...
Article
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As a result of co‐evolution between plants and herbivores, related plants often interact with similar herbivore communities. Variation in plant–herbivore interactions is determined by variation in underlying functional traits and by ecological and stochastic processes. Hence, typically, only a subset of possible interactions is realised on individu...
Article
Insect herbivores interact via plant-mediated interactions in which one herbivore species induces changes in plant quality that affects the performance of a second phytophagous insect that shares the food plant. These interactions are often asymmetric due to specificity in induced plant responses to herbivores, amount of plant damage, elicitors in...
Article
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Background The microbiome of many insects consists of a diverse community of microorganisms that can play critical roles in the functioning and overall health of their hosts. Although the microbial communities of insects have been studied thoroughly over the past decade, little is still known about how biotic interactions affect the microbial commu...
Article
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Plants have evolved plastic defence strategies to deal with the uncertainty of when, by which species and in which order attack by herbivores will take place1–3. However, the responses to current herbivore attack may come with a cost of compromising resistance to other, later arriving herbivores. Due to antagonistic cross-talk between physiological...
Article
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There is increasing awareness that interactions between plants and insects can be mediated by microbial symbionts. Nonetheless, evidence showing that symbionts associated with organisms beyond the second trophic level affect plant-insect interactions are restricted to a few cases belonging to parasitoid-associated bracoviruses. Insect parasitoids h...
Article
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Plants are members of complex communities of which arthropods are the most speciose members. The role of carnivores in shaping the outcome of multi‐trophic interactions by top‐down control of herbivores has been well studied. Particularly, the positive impacts of natural enemies of herbivores on plants through direct (consumptive) and indirect (non...
Article
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Evolutionary arms-races between plants and insect herbivores have long been proposed to generate key innovations such as plant toxins and detoxification mechanisms that can drive diversification of the interacting species. A novel front-line of plant defence is the killing of herbivorous insect eggs. We test whether an egg-killing plant trait has a...
Preprint
Full-text available
In nature, plants interact with multiple insect herbivores that may arrive simultaneously or sequentially. Because insect herbivores often have a negative effect on plant fitness, plants have evolved mechanisms to defend their tissues from being eaten. There is extensive knowledge on the regulation of induced plant responses to single or dual attac...
Article
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Plants are often attacked by multiple insect herbivores. How plants deal with an increasing richness of attackers from a single or multiple feeding guilds is poorly understood. We subjected black mustard (Brassica nigra) plants to 51 treatments representing attack by an increasing species richness (1, 2 or 4 species) of either phloem feeders, leaf...
Article
To achieve ecological and reproductive success, plants need to mitigate a multitude of stressors. The stressors encountered by plants are highly dynamic but typically vary predictably due to seasonality or correlations among stressors. As plants face physiological and ecological constraints in responses to stress, it can be beneficial for plants to...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plant defence strategies; predictability; ecological interaction networks; cabbage and mustard 24 family; co-evolution Abstract 28 As a result of co-evolution between plants and herbivores, related plants often interact with 29 similar communities of herbivores. On individual plants, typically only a subset of interactions 30 is realized. The stoch...
Article
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Plants compete with their neighbours for limiting resources such as light and nitrogen, which can promote competitive ability at the expense of other functions such as chemical defence against insect herbivory. This trade-off is strongly influenced by dynamic interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. Yet, understanding how these interactions in...
Article
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Biological pest control depends on the ability of natural enemies to find herbivore-infested plants, which is often guided by herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs). While foraging behavior of natural enemies has been extensively studied under controlled conditions, little is known on how odor-guided foraging behavior is influenced by fluctuatin...
Article
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Parasitoids need to find their plant-feeding hosts in complex environments that contain multiple other plant and insect species. They usually rely on herbivore-induced plant volatiles to locate herbivore-infested plants from a distance and their foraging efficiency may be reduced when volatile information is not available. Downwind foraging during...
Article
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Species‐specific responses to the environment can moderate the strength of interactions between plants, herbivores and parasitoids. However, the ways in which characteristics of plants, such as genotypic variation in herbivore induced volatiles (HIPVs) that attract parasitoids, affect trophic interactions in different contexts of plant patch size a...
Article
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ContextTritrophic interactions may be affected by local factors and the broader landscape context. At small spatial scales, carnivorous enemies of herbivorous insects use herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) to find herbivores, but it is unknown whether variation in plant attractiveness due to differential HIPV emission can enhance recruitment...
Article
A plant's offspring may escape unfavourable local conditions through seed dispersal. Whether plants use this strategy to escape insect herbivores is not well understood. Here, we explore how different dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) populations, including diploid outcrossers and triploid apomicts, modify seed dispersal in response to root her...
Article
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Plants show ontogenetic variation in growth‐defence strategies to maximize reproductive output within a community context. Most work on plant ontogenetic variation in growth‐defence trade‐offs has focussed on interactions with antagonistic insect herbivores. Plants respond to herbivore attack with phenotypic changes. Despite the knowledge that plan...
Article
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Parasitoids depend on other insects for the development of their offspring. Their eggs are laid in or on a host insect that is consumed during juvenile development. Parasitoids harbor a diversity of microbial symbionts including viruses, bacteria, and fungi. In contrast to symbionts of herbivorous and hematophagous insects, parasitoid symbionts do...
Article
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A vast body of research demonstrates that many ecological and evolutionary processes can only be understood from a tri‐trophic viewpoint, that is, one that moves beyond the pairwise interactions of neighbouring trophic levels to consider the emergent features of interactions among multiple trophic levels. Despite its unifying potential, tri‐trophic...
Article
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Herbivore attack can alter plant interactions with pollinators, ranging from reduced to enhanced pollinator visitation. The direction and strength of effects of herbivory on pollinator visitation could be contingent on the type of plant tissue or organ attacked by herbivores, but this has seldom been tested experimentally. We investigated the effec...
Preprint
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Evolutionary arms-races between plants and herbivores have been proposed to generate key innovations that can drive diversification of the interacting species. Recent studies reveal that plant traits that target herbivore insect eggs are widespread throughout the plant kingdom. Within the Brassicaceae family, some plants express a hypersensitive re...
Article
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Insect hyperparasitoids are fourth trophic level organisms that commonly occur in terrestrial food webs, yet they are relatively understudied. These top‐carnivores can disrupt biological pest control by suppressing the populations of their parasitoid hosts leading to pest outbreaks, especially in confined environments such as greenhouses where augm...
Article
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Introduction The oxylipin methyl jasmonate (MeJA) is a plant hormone active in response signalling and defence against herbivores. Although MeJA is applied experimentally to mimic herbivory and induce plant defences, its downstream effects on the plant metabolome are largely uncharacterized, especially in the context of primary growth and tissue-sp...
Article
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In perennial plants, interactions with other community members during the vegetative growth phase may influence community assembly during subsequent reproductive years and may influence plant fitness. It is well known that plant responses to herbivory affect community assembly within a growing season, but whether plant‐herbivore interactions result...
Article
Plant phenotypic plasticity in response to herbivore attack includes changes in flower traits. Such herbivore-induced changes in flower traits have consequences for interactions with flower visitors. We synthesize here current knowledge on the specificity of herbivore-induced changes in flower traits, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the ec...
Article
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Foraging animals face the difficult task to find resources in complex environments that contain conflicting information. The presence of a non-suitable resource that provides attractive cues can be expected to confuse foraging animals and to reduce their foraging efficiency. We used the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata to study the effect of non-host-i...
Article
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Although consumers often rely on chemical information to optimize their foraging strategies, it is poorly understood how top carnivores above the third trophic level find resources in heterogeneous environments. Hyperparasitoids are a common group of organisms in the fourth trophic level that lay their eggs in or on the body of other parasitoid hos...
Data
Figure S1. The relative increase in seed production (%) for plants that regulate leaf‐level defence by R:FR when competing against plants that distribute defence homogeneously over the canopy (blue: increase in fitness, red decrease in fitness) (scenario 3). Left panel: strategies that compromise total defence investment by suppressing defence in l...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plants allow their offspring to escape unfavourable local conditions through seed dispersal. Whether plants use this strategy to escape herbivores is not well understood. Here, we explore how different Taraxacum officinale populations modify seed dispersal in response to root herbivore attack by Melolontha melolontha in the field. Root herbivore at...
Article
Full-text available
Plants balance the allocation of resources between growth and defence to optimise fitness in a competitive environment. Perception of neighbour detection cues, such as a low ratio of red to far‐red radiation (R:FR), activates a suite of shade‐avoidance responses that include stem elongation and upward leaf movement, while simultaneously downregulat...
Article
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Plant phenotypic plasticity in response to antagonists can affect other community members such as mutualists, conferring potential ecological costs associated with inducible plant defence. For flowering plants, induction of defences to deal with herbivores can lead to disruption of plant‐pollinator interactions. Current knowledge on the full extent...
Article
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Chemical information influences the behaviour of many animals, thus affecting species interactions. Many animals forage for resources that are heterogeneously distributed in space and time, and have evolved foraging behaviour that utilizes information related to these resources. Herbivore‐induced plant volatiles (HIPVs), emitted by plants upon herb...
Article
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p>Foraging animals face the difficult task to find resources in complex environments that contain conflicting information. The presence of a non-suitable resource that provides attractive cues can be expected to confuse foraging animals and to reduce their foraging efficiency. We used the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata to study the effect of non-host...
Article
Full-text available
Insects typically forage in complex habitats in which their resources are surrounded by non-resources. For herbivores, pollinators, parasitoids, and higher level predators research has focused on how specific trophic levels filter and integrate information from cues in their habitat to locate resources. However, these insights frequently build spec...
Article
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Plants defend themselves against diverse communities of herbivorous insects. This requires an investment of limited resources, for which plants also compete with neighbours. The consequences of an investment in defence are determined by the metabolic costs of defence as well as indirect or ecological costs through interactions with other organisms....
Article
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One of the main abiotic stresses that strongly affects plant survival and the primary cause of crop loss around the world is drought.
Article
Significance Symbiotic relationships benefit organisms in utilization of new niches. In parasitoid wasps, symbiotic viruses and venom that are injected together with wasp eggs into the host caterpillar suppress immune responses of the host and enhance parasitoid survival. We found that the virus also has negative effects on offspring survival when...
Article
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Microbial mutualistic symbiosis is increasingly recognised as a hidden driving force in the ecology of plant–insect interactions. Although plant‐associated and herbivore‐associated symbionts clearly affect interactions between plants and herbivores, the effects of symbionts associated with higher trophic levels has been largely overlooked. At the t...
Data
Result summary of experiments performed by Eliezer Khaling and James Blande (University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio) showing direct and indirect effects of ozone (O3) on Pieris brassicae performance while feeding and growing on the host plant, Brassica nigra. Metabolic analysis performed by Stefano Papazian (Umeå University) on B. nigra leaves expos...
Article
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In plant–arthropod associations, the first herbivores to colonise a plant may directly or indirectly affect community assembly on that particular plant. Whether the order of arrival of different arthropod species further modulates community assembly and affects plant fitness remains unclear. Using wild Brassica oleracea plants in the field, we mani...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: Plants usually compete with neighbouring plants for resources such as light as well as defend themselves against herbivorous insects. This requires investment of limiting resources, resulting in optimal resource distribution patterns and trade-offs between growth- and defence-related traits. A plant's competitive success is de...
Article
Full-text available
1. Parasitoids are known to utilise learning of herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) when foraging for their herbivorous host. In natural situations these hosts share food plants with other, non-suitable herbivores (non-hosts). Simultaneous infestation of plants by hosts and non-hosts has been found to result in induction of HIPVs that differ...