Erich Jarvis

Erich Jarvis
The Rockefeller University | Rockefeller · Laboratory of Neurogenetics of Language

Ph.D

About

369
Publications
113,761
Reads
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24,993
Citations
Citations since 2017
131 Research Items
12619 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202305001,0001,5002,0002,500
201720182019202020212022202305001,0001,5002,0002,500
Introduction
Erich Jarvis investigates the neurobiology of vocal learning, one of the most important behaviors for spoken language. His specific quest is to determine the molecular mechanisms that construct, modify, and maintain neural circuits for vocal learning. He is working on developing neuroengineering tools to manipulate vocal learning circuits and circuits for other complex behavioral traits.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
The Rockefeller University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
January 2016 - December 2016
Duke University Medical Center
Position
  • Professor (Full)
January 2008 - present
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Position
  • Investigator

Publications

Publications (369)
Article
Full-text available
Senescence, an age-related decline in survival and/or reproductive performance, occurs in species across the tree of life. Molecular mechanisms underlying this within-individual phenomenon are still largely unknown, but DNA methylation changes with age are among the candidates. Using a longitudinal approach, we investigated age-specific changes in...
Article
Full-text available
Background The Australian black swan (Cygnus atratus) is an iconic species with contrasting plumage to that of the closely related northern hemisphere white swans. The relative geographic isolation of the black swan may have resulted in a limited immune repertoire and increased susceptibility to infectious diseases, notably infectious diseases from...
Article
Full-text available
Insights into the evolution of non-model organisms are limited by the lack of reference genomes of high accuracy, completeness, and contiguity. Here, we present a chromosome-level, karyotype-validated reference genome and pangenome for the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica). We complement these resources with a reference-free multialignment of the refe...
Article
Speech and language play an important role in human vocal communication. Studies have shown that vocal disorders can result from genetic factors. In the absence of high-quality data on humans, mouse vocalization experiments in laboratory settings have been proven useful in providing valuable insights into mammalian vocal development, including espe...
Article
Oscine songbirds have served as a model for speech and its evolution since the discovery that birds in this clade learn to produce their songs by imitating conspecifics. We discuss the initial characterization of neural substrates for song learning and highlight several avenues of neuroscientific, phylogenetic, and genomic research that have advanc...
Article
Full-text available
Background The Nile rat (Avicanthis niloticus) is an important animal model because of its robust diurnal rhythm, a cone-rich retina, and a propensity to develop diet-induced diabetes without chemical or genetic modifications. A closer similarity to humans in these aspects, compared to the widely used Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus models, hold...
Article
Full-text available
The current human reference genome, GRCh38, represents over 20 years of effort to generate a high-quality assembly, which has benefitted society1,2. However, it still has many gaps and errors, and does not represent a biological genome as it is a blend of multiple individuals3,4. Recently, a high-quality telomere-to-telomere reference, CHM13, was g...
Article
Full-text available
Background False duplications in genome assemblies lead to false biological conclusions. We quantified false duplications in popularly used previous genome assemblies for platypus, zebra finch, and Anna’s Hummingbird, and their new counterparts of the same species generated by the Vertebrate Genomes Project, of which the Vertebrate Genomes Project...
Article
Full-text available
Background Many short-read genome assemblies have been found to be incomplete and contain mis-assemblies. The Vertebrate Genomes Project has been producing new reference genome assemblies with an emphasis on being as complete and error-free as possible, which requires utilizing long reads, long-range scaffolding data, new assembly algorithms, and m...
Article
Full-text available
Vocal learning is thought to have evolved in 3 orders of birds (songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds), with each showing similar brain regions that have comparable gene expression specializations relative to the surrounding forebrain motor circuitry. Here, we searched for signatures of these same gene expression specializations in previously unchar...
Article
Full-text available
Some aspects of the neural mechanisms underlying mouse ultrasonic vocalisations (USVs) are a useful model for the neurobiology of human speech and speech-related disorders. Much of the research on vocalisations and USVs is limited to offline methods and supervised classification of USVs, hindering the discovery of new types of vocalisations and the...
Article
Full-text available
Background Studies in vertebrate genomics require sampling from a broad range of tissue types, taxa, and localities. Recent advancements in long-read and long-range genome sequencing have made it possible to produce high-quality chromosome-level genome assemblies for almost any organism. However, adequate tissue preservation for the requisite ultra...
Preprint
Background The blue whale, Balaenoptera musculus , is the largest animal known to have ever existed. Body size is tightly coupled to cell metabolism and environmental adaptations. A high-quality genome assembly of this magnificent animal will aid our understanding of body size regulation and related biological processes. Results We report a referen...
Article
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High-quality reference genomes for non-model species can benefit conservation.
Preprint
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The Human Pangenome Reference Consortium (HPRC) presents a first draft human pangenome reference. The pangenome contains 47 phased, diploid assemblies from a cohort of genetically diverse individuals. These assemblies cover more than 99% of the expected sequence and are more than 99% accurate at the structural and base-pair levels. Based on alignme...
Article
Full-text available
Motivation With the current pace at which reference genomes are being produced, the availability of tools that can reliably and efficiently generate genome assembly summary statistics has become critical. Additionally, with the emergence of new algorithms and data types, tools that can improve the quality of existing assemblies through automated an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Vocal learning is a skilled motor behavior observed in several mammalian and avian species and is critical for human speech. While convergent gene expression patterns have highlighted similar primary motor and striatal pathways for vocal imitation in songbirds and humans, the extent of molecular and circuit convergence remains unresolved. Here we p...
Article
Full-text available
Single-nuclei RNA sequencing characterizes cell types at the gene level. However, compared to single-cell approaches, many single-nuclei cDNAs are purely intronic, lack barcodes and hinder the study of isoforms. Here we present single-nuclei isoform RNA sequencing (SnISOr-Seq). Using microfluidics, PCR-based artifact removal, target enrichment and...
Article
Full-text available
Variant calling has been widely used for genotyping and for improving the consensus accuracy of long-read assemblies. Variant calls are commonly hard-filtered with user-defined cutoffs. However, it is impossible to define a single set of optimal cutoffs, as the calls heavily depend on the quality of the reads, the variant caller of choice and the q...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Australian black swan (Cygnus atratus) is an iconic species with contrasting plumage to that of the closely related Northern Hemisphere white swans. The relative geographic isolation of the black swan may have resulted in a limited immune repertoire and increased susceptibility to infectious disease, notably infectious diseases from which Austr...
Article
Full-text available
Modern human lifestyle strongly depends on complex social traits like empathy, tolerance and cooperation. These diverse facets of social cognition have been associated with variation in the oxytocin receptor (OTR) and its sister genes, the vasotocin/vasopressin receptors (VTR1A/AVPR1A and AVPR1B/VTR1B). Here, we compared the available genomic seque...
Article
Full-text available
Since its initial release in 2000, the human reference genome has covered only the euchromatic fraction of the genome, leaving important heterochromatic regions unfinished. Addressing the remaining 8% of the genome, the Telomere-to-Telomere (T2T) Consortium presents a complete 3.055 billion-base pair sequence of a human genome, T2T-CHM13, that incl...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a charismatic strepsirrhine primate endemic to Madagascar. These lemurs are of particular interest, given their status as a flagship species and widespread publicity in the popular media. Unfortunately, a recent population decline has resulted in the census population decreasing to <2,500 individu...
Article
The human reference genome is the most widely used resource in human genetics and is due for a major update. Its current structure is a linear composite of merged haplotypes from more than 20 people, with a single individual comprising most of the sequence. It contains biases and errors within a framework that does not represent global human genomi...
Preprint
Insights into the evolution of non-model organisms are often limited by the lack of reference genomes. As part of the Vertebrate Genomes Project, we present a new reference genome and a pangenome produced with High-Fidelity long reads for the barn swallow Hirundo rustica. We then generated a reference-free multialignment with other bird genomes to...
Preprint
Full-text available
Motivation With the current pace at which reference genomes are being produced, the availability of tools that can reliably and efficiently generate genome assembly summary statistics has become critical. Additionally, with the emergence of new algorithms and data types, tools that can improve the quality of existing assemblies through automated an...
Article
Full-text available
Routine haplotype-resolved genome assembly from single samples remains an unresolved problem. Here we describe an algorithm that combines PacBio HiFi reads and Hi-C chromatin interaction data to produce a haplotype-resolved assembly without the sequencing of parents. Applied to human and other vertebrate samples, our algorithm consistently outperfo...
Article
Full-text available
Build a major genomics resource on the continent to help breeders and conservationists.
Article
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The zebra finch is one of the most commonly studied songbirds in biology, particularly in genomics, neuroscience and vocal communication. However, this species lacks a robust cell line for molecular biology research and reagent optimization. We generated a cell line, designated CFS414, from zebra finch embryonic fibroblasts using the SV40 large and...
Preprint
Full-text available
The current human reference genome, GRCh38, represents over 20 years of effort to generate a high-quality assembly, which has greatly benefited society. However, it still has many gaps and errors, and does not represent a biological human genome since it is a blend of multiple individuals. Recently, a high-quality telomere-to-telomere reference gen...
Article
Full-text available
Progress in genome sequencing now enables the large-scale generation of reference genomes. Various international initiatives aim to generate reference genomes representing global biodiversity. These genomes provide unique insights into genomic diversity and architecture, thereby enabling comprehensive analyses of population and functional genomics,...
Preprint
Senescence, an age-related decline in survival and/or reproductive performance, occurs in species across the tree of life. Molecular mechanisms underlying this within-individual phenomenon are still largely unknown, but DNA methylation changes with age are among the candidates. Using a longitudinal approach, we investigated age-specific changes in...
Article
Full-text available
Life on Earth has evolved from initial simplicity to the astounding complexity we experience today. Bacteria and archaea have largely excelled in metabolic diversification, but eukaryotes additionally display abundant morphological innovation. How have these innovations come about and what constraints are there on the origins of novelty and the con...
Article
Full-text available
November 2020 marked 2 y since the launch of the Earth BioGenome Project (EBP), which aims to sequence all known eukaryotic species in a 10-y timeframe. Since then, significant progress has been made across all aspects of the EBP roadmap, as outlined in the 2018 article describing the project’s goals, strategies, and challenges (1). The launch phas...
Article
Full-text available
Genomics encompasses the entire tree of life, both extinct and extant, and the evolutionary processes that shape this diversity. To date, genomic research has focused on humans, a small number of agricultural species, and established laboratory models. Fewer than 18,000 of ∼2,000,000 eukaryotic species (<1%) have a representative genome sequence in...
Article
Full-text available
A global international initiative, such as the Earth BioGenome Project (EBP), requires both agreement and coordination on standards to ensure that the collective effort generates rapid progress toward its goals. To this end, the EBP initiated five technical standards committees comprising volunteer members from the global genomics scientific commun...
Article
Full-text available
Progress in genome sequencing now enables the large-scale generation of reference genomes. Various international initiatives aim to generate reference genomes representing global biodiversity. These genomes provide unique insights into genomic diversity and architecture, thereby enabling comprehensive analyses of population and functional genomics,...
Article
Full-text available
Auteurs : European Reference Genome Atlas (ERGA) Consortium 3
Preprint
Full-text available
Sea turtles represent an ancient lineage of marine vertebrates that evolved from terrestrial ancestors over 100 MYA, yet the genomic basis of the unique physiological and ecological traits enabling these species to thrive in diverse marine habitats remain largely unknown. Additionally, many populations have declined drastically due to anthropogenic...
Article
Full-text available
Impressive global efforts have identified both rare and common gene variants associated with severe COVID-19 using sequencing technologies. However, these studies lack the sensitivity to accurately detect several classes of variants, especially large structural variants (SVs), which account for a substantial proportion of genetic diversity includin...
Preprint
The slow-evolving invertebrate amphioxus has an irreplaceable role in advancing our understanding into the vertebrate origin and innovations. Here we resolve the nearly complete chromosomal genomes of three amphioxus species, one of which best recapitulates the 17 chordate ancestor linkage groups. We reconstruct the fusions, retention or rearrangem...
Preprint
Full-text available
Single-nuclei RNA-Seq is being widely employed to investigate cell types, especially of human brain and other frozen samples. In contrast to single-cell approaches, however, the majority of single-nuclei RNA counts originate from partially processed RNA leading to intronic cDNAs, thus hindering the investigation of complete isoforms. Here, using mi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The patterns of genetic relatedness among individuals vary along the genome, representing fluctuation of local ancestry. The factors responsible for this variation have not been well studied in wild animals with ecological and behavioural relevance. Here, we characterise the genomic architecture of genetic relatedness in the Eurasian blackcap, an i...
Article
Full-text available
Background The tufted duck is a non-model organism that experiences high mortality in highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks. It belongs to the same bird family (Anatidae) as the mallard, one of the best-studied natural hosts of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Studies in non-model bird species are crucial to disentangle the role of the...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Nile rat (Avicanthis niloticus) is an important animal model for biomedical research, including the study of diurnal rhythms and type 2 diabetes. Here, we report a 2.5 Gb, chromosome-level reference genome assembly with fully resolved parental haplotypes, generated with the Vertebrate Genomes Project (VGP). The assembly is highly contiguous, wi...
Article
Full-text available
The Bengalese finch was domesticated more than 250 years ago from the wild white-rumped munia (WRM). Similar to other domesticated species, Bengalese finches show a reduced fear response and have lower corticosterone levels, compared to WRMs. Bengalese finches and munias also have different song types. Since oxytocin (OT) has been found to be invol...
Article
Full-text available
Background Modern sequencing technologies should make the assembly of the relatively small mitochondrial genomes an easy undertaking. However, few tools exist that address mitochondrial assembly directly. Results As part of the Vertebrate Genomes Project (VGP) we develop mitoVGP, a fully automated pipeline for similarity-based identification of mi...
Article
Vocal learning, the ability to imitate sounds from conspecifics and the environment, is a key component of human spoken language and learned song in three independently evolved avian groups—oscine songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds. Humans and each of these three bird clades exhibit specialized behavioral, neuroanatomical, and brain gene expressi...
Article
Full-text available
Summary The kākāpō is a flightless parrot endemic to New Zealand. Once common in the archipelago, only 201 individuals remain today, most of them descending from an isolated island population. We report the first genome-wide analyses of the species, including a high-quality genome assembly for kākāpō, one of the first chromosome-level reference ge...
Preprint
Routine single-sample haplotype-resolved assembly remains an unresolved problem. Here we describe a new algorithm that combines PacBio HiFi reads and Hi-C chromatin interaction data to produce a haplotype-resolved assembly without the sequencing of parents. Applied to human and other vertebrate samples, our algorithm consistently outperforms existi...
Article
Full-text available
The kākāpō is a flightless parrot endemic to New Zealand. Once common in the archipelago, only 201 individuals remain today, most of them descending from an isolated island population. We report the first genome-wide analyses of the species, including a high-quality genome assembly for kākāpō, one of the first chromosome-level reference genomes seq...
Article
Correlations between differences in animal behavior and brain structures have been used to infer function of those structures. Brain region size has especially been suggested to be important for an animal's behavioral capability, controlled by specific brain regions. The oval nucleus of the mesopallium (MO) is part of the anterior forebrain vocal l...
Preprint
Full-text available
Read mapping and variant calling approaches have been widely used for accurate genotyping and improving consensus quality assembled from noisy long reads. Variant calling accuracy relies heavily on the read quality, the precision of the read mapping algorithm and variant caller, and the criteria adopted to filter the calls. However, it is impossibl...
Preprint
Full-text available
Studying the neurological, genetic and evolutionary basis of human vocal communication mechanisms is an important field of neuroscience. In the absence of high quality data on humans, mouse vocalization experiments in laboratory settings have been proven to be useful in providing valuable insights into mammalian vocal development and evolution, inc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Studies in vertebrate genomics require sampling from a broad range of tissue types, taxa, and localities. Recent advancements in long-read and long-range genome sequencing have made it possible to produce high-quality chromosome-level genome assemblies for almost any organism. However, adequate tissue preservation for the requisite ultra-high molec...
Preprint
Full-text available
Zebra finches are sexually dimorphic vocal learners. Males learn to sing by imitating mature conspecifics, but females do not. The lack of vocal learning in females is associated with anatomical differences in the neural circuits responsible for vocal learning, including the atrophy of several brain regions during development. However, this atrophy...
Article
Full-text available
The accurate and complete assembly of both haplotype sequences of a diploid organism is essential to understanding the role of variation in genome functions, phenotypes, and diseases1. Here, using a trio-binning approach, we present a high-quality, diploid reference genome, with both haplotypes assembled independently at the chromosome level, for t...
Article
Full-text available
With the advent of chromatin-interaction maps, chromosome-level genome assemblies have become a reality for a wide range of organisms. Scaffolding quality is, however, difficult to judge. To explore this gap, we generated multiple chromosome-scale genome assemblies of an emerging wild animal model for carcinogenesis, the California sea lion (Zaloph...
Preprint
Full-text available
In 2001, Celera Genomics and the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium published their initial drafts of the human genome, which revolutionized the field of genomics. While these drafts and the updates that followed effectively covered the euchromatic fraction of the genome, the heterochromatin and many other complex regions were left un...
Preprint
Full-text available
The zebra finch is a powerful model for several biological fields, particularly neuroscience and vocal communication. However, this species lacks a robust cell line for molecular biology research and reagent optimization. Here we describe a cell line, CFS414, generated from zebra finch embryonic fibroblasts using the SV40 large and small T antigens...
Article
We present a genome assembly from an individual female Salmo trutta (the brown trout; Chordata; Actinopteri; Salmoniformes; Salmonidae). The genome sequence is 2.37 gigabases in span. The majority of the assembly is scaffolded into 40 chromosomal pseudomolecules. Gene annotation of this assembly on Ensembl has identified 43,935 protein coding genes...
Article
Full-text available
Songbirds acquire songs by imitation, as humans do speech. Although imitation should drive convergence within a group and divergence through drift between groups, zebra finch songs sustain high diversity within a colony, but mild variation across colonies. We investigated this phenomenon by analyzing vocal learning statistics in 160 tutor-pupil pai...