Erica Willheim

Erica Willheim
NYU Langone Medical Center | NYUMC · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

PhD

About

13
Publications
8,791
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403
Citations
Citations since 2016
2 Research Items
246 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040

Publications

Publications (13)
Presentation
Full-text available
Objectives: Toxic stress in young children, also known as adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), may lead to changes in their nervous system, affect their development, and influence their mental and physical health. Pedia-tricians and child and adolescent psychiatrists are uniquely positioned to help families in difficult situations to reduce the ri...
Article
This study found that within a non-referred community pediatrics clinic sample, the severity of mothers' trauma-related psychopathology, in particular, their interpersonal violence-related (IPV) posttraumatic stress, dissociative, and depressive symptoms predicted the degree of negativity of mothers' attributions towards their preschool age childre...
Article
Full-text available
This study found that within a non-referred community pediatrics clinic sample, the severity of mothers' trauma-related psychopathology, in particular, their interpersonal violence-related (IPV) posttraumatic stress, dissociative, and depressive symptoms predicted the degree of negativity of mothers' attributions towards their preschool age childre...
Article
Full-text available
This article briefly reviews the historical and empiric foundations of dyadic psychotherapy, highlighting the evolution of the central tenet that very young children exist in a relational context. The target of therapeutic intervention must therefore be the caregiver-child relationship. General features of dyadic psychotherapy are discussed, as wel...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to understand if greater severity of maternal posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), related to maternal report of interpersonal violence, mediates the effects of such violence on (a) child PTSS as well as on (b) child externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Study participants were mothers (N = 77) and children 18 to 48 months recr...
Article
Full-text available
This study tested whether mothers with interpersonal violence-related posttraumatic stress disorder (IPV-PTSD) vs healthy controls (HC) would show greater limbic and less frontocortical activity when viewing young children during separation compared to quiet play. Mothers of 20 children (12–42 months) participated: 11 IPV-PTSD mothers and 9 HC with...
Article
Full-text available
The literature suggests an adverse impact of maternal stress related to interpersonal violence on parent-child interaction. The current study investigated associations between a mother's self-reported parent-child relationship dysfunction and what she does in response to her child's cues. It also examined whether maternal perception of parent-child...
Article
This study examined media viewing by mothers with violence-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related media exposure of their preschool-age children. Mothers (N = 67) recruited from community pediatric clinics participated in a protocol involving a media-preference survey. Severity of maternal PTSD and dissociation were significantly...
Article
As the field of attachment has expanded over the past four decades, the perturbations in the relational context which give rise to disturbances of attachment are increasingly, though by no means conclusively, understood. In Part I, this article reviews the historical and current state of research regarding normative attachment classification, the d...
Article
Full-text available
In this treatment model, it is the therapist who first demonstrates what it is to consider safely the mind of another. The psychiatrist demonstrates that he can reflect on Carol's feelings and behaviors without himself becoming dysregulated. The psychiatrist considers Carol's mind as that of a distinct person, confronting specific experiences, at a...

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