Eric Wolanski

Eric Wolanski
James Cook University · College of Science and Engineering

Professor

About

377
Publications
110,549
Reads
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19,769
Citations
Citations since 2017
48 Research Items
7231 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,200
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,200
Introduction
Two new books https://www.elsevier.com/books/coastal-wetlands/perillo/978-0-444-63893-9 https://www.elsevier.com/books/coasts-and-estuaries/wolanski/978-0-12-814003-1 Mnaya, B., Mtahiko, M., Wolanski, E. (2017). The Serengeti will die if Kenya dams the Mara River. Oryx, 51(4), 581-583. Yanfang Li • Eric Wolanski • Zhenfei Dai • Jonathan Lambrechts • Cheng Tang • Hua Zhang. (2018). Trapping of plastics in semi-enclosed seas: Insights from the Bohai Sea, China. Marine Pollution Bulletin. Published on 01 Dec 2018, doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.10.038 Kingsford, M.J., Wolanski. E. (2019). Oceanography. pp. 37-49 in Hutchings, P., Kingsford, M, Hoegh-Guldlberg, O. (Eds), The Great Barrier Reef. CSIRO Publishing and Springer, Collingwood and Dordrecht.
Additional affiliations
May 2014 - March 2015
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Ecohydrology of the Bohai Sea Land-Ocean Interaction in the Coastal Zone
January 2014 - December 2014
National Centre For Sustainable Coastal Management
Position
  • Visiting Advisor
Description
  • Mentoring scientists in the use of (1) the muddy LOICZ estuarine nutrient biogeochemical model to several Indian estuaries and (2) the UNESCO estuarine ecohydrology model to estimate the ecosystem functioning and health of Chilika Lagoon
October 2013 - October 2013
Universidade do Algarve
Position
  • Visiting Erasmus Mundus scholar in ecohydrology

Publications

Publications (377)
Article
Headlands, islands, and reefs generate complex three-dimensional secondary flows that result in physical and biological fronts. Mixing and diffusion processes near these reefs and headlands are quite different from these processes in the open sea, and classical advection-diffusion models that were developed for the open sea are not valid near shore...
Book
Full-text available
Estuarine Ecohydrology, Second Edition, provides an ecohydrology viewpoint of an estuary as an ecosystem by focusing on its principal components, the river, the estuarine waters, the sediment, the nutrients, the wetlands, the oceanic influence, and the aquatic food web, as well as models of the health of an estuary ecosystem. Estuaries, the interse...
Article
Full-text available
A predictive model of the fate of coral reef fish larvae in a reef system is proposed that combines the oceanographic processes of advection and turbulent diffusion with the biological process of horizontal swimming controlled by olfactory and auditory cues within the timescales of larval development. In the model, auditory cues resulted in swimmin...
Article
The conservation of coastal ecosystems can provide considerable coastal protection benefits, but this role has not been sufficiently accounted for in coastal planning and engineering. Substantial evidence now exists showing how, and under what conditions, ecosystems can play a valuable function in wave and storm surge attenuation, erosion reduction...
Article
Full-text available
For many years, local communities have expressed concerns that turbid plume waters from the Fly River in Papua New Guinea may potentially deliver mine-derived contaminants to the Torres Strait, an ecologically and culturally unique area north of the Australian mainland. Information on suspended sediment transport and turbidity patterns are needed i...
Chapter
The patterns of reproduction and ontogeny in the taxonomically rich estuary- associated fishes from around the world, including all the major groups from elasmobranchs to bony fishes, are as diverse as documented for fishes living in other ecosystems. Further, the diversity in the life histories of bony fishes, the dominant group in estuaries, is c...
Article
This study documents the impact of climate change and human activities on the Burdekin River delta and coast. The Burdekin River is located in the dry tropics with a seasonally and interannually highly variable discharge, controlled by occasional cyclones and the ENSO-dependent monsoon. Even though the peak discharge from cyclonic rainfall is decre...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Estuarine sediments harbour a plethora of life forms that engineer the structural and functional properties of these sediments. A large consortia of microorganisms, especially bacteria and archaea take part in organic matter breakdown as part of their respiratory mechanisms and along with macro-and meiofauna that works through bioturbation, indepen...
Article
A 30-year time series of the recruitment of rabbit fish, an herbivorous coral reef fish, on the island of Guam in the tropical western Pacific, showed variability that ENSO alone does not explain. To help explain this variability, a high-resolution biophysical model that includes directional swimming reveals how mesoscale turbulence and ENSO-driven...
Article
Full-text available
Cubozoan jellyfish are classified as plankton despite the strong swimming and orientation abilities of cubomedusae. How these capabilities could affect cubozoan population structures is poorly understood. Medusae of the cubozoan Copula sivickisi can uniquely attach to surfaces with the sticky pads on their bells. Biophysical modelling was used to i...
Article
There is a concern that the Fly River plume from Papua New Guinea (PNG) may be delivering mine-derived polluted mud along the southern PNG coast into the northern Torres Strait, which is the northernmost extent of the Great Barrier Reef. To quantify this threat, the mud transport dynamics along the southern PNG coast were studied using the SLIM mod...
Article
Full-text available
Availability of water for wildlife in some of the national parks in Tanzania has been hampered by several factors including the effect of climate change. Anthropogenic factors have also a stake of contribution with this regard to this due to the fact that, most of the water catchments are outside the national parks. In order to ensure the survival...
Article
It is hypothesized that spatio-temporal variability in larval supply is caused by multiple biophysical drivers which correlate with the occurrence of recruitment pulses, influencing the recovery potential of coral reefs following large-scale disturbances. Here, we used a larval dispersal model to explore coral larvae dispersal patterns under variab...
Article
The formerly perennial Katuma River in western Tanzania starts in a protected forest, it then flows through irrigated rice farms before reaching Lake Katavi, a floodplain wetland whose outflow regulates the river flow through the Katavi National Park (KNP) down to its outlet at Lake Rukwa, which has no outlet. In recent years, due to overexploitati...
Article
Full-text available
In the Greater Serengeti-Mara ecosystem, with the Serengeti National Park (SNP) at its core, people and wildlife are strongly dependent on water supply that has a strong seasonal and inter-annual variability. The Mara River, the only perennial river in SNP, and a number of small streams originate from outside SNP before flowing through it. In those...
Article
The development of sensorial acuity and swimming capabilities of coastal fish larvae and their responses to coastal nursery cues are essential for recruitment success. Most studies of the response of fish larvae to environmental cues and their recruitment into nursery areas have focused on coral reef fish and only a few studies focused on fish spec...
Article
Full-text available
The medusae of cubozoan jellyfishes have sophisticated behaviours and are strong swimmers. Therefore, they have the potential to influence their distribution and connectivity among populations. We used ecological and behavioural data in combination with local oceanography to estimate the potential for medusae of the cubozoan Copula sivickisi to dis...
Article
The Spratly Islands archipelago in the South China Sea is a disputed marine area impacted by a destructive free-for-all race to resources. Though physically open, the archipelago is a semi-closed system because the flushing time scales are comparable to the pelagic larval duration of coral and reef fish larvae. Island-building, overfishing and dest...
Article
It is hypothesized that spatio-temporal variability in larval supply is caused by multiple biophysical drivers which correlate with the occurrence of recruitment pulses, influencing the recovery potential of coral reefs following large-scale disturbances. Here, we used a larval dispersal model to explore coral larvae dispersal patterns under variab...
Article
The 500 km long Far Northern Great Barrier Reef (FNGBR) is a semi-enclosed sea with little connectivity with the rest of the GBR further South. Its mean circulation is controlled by the prevailing southeasterly (northwestward) wind that generates a wind-driven mean longshore flow that is enabled by an inflow of oceanic water in the South. From an e...
Article
Full-text available
The Sense Acuity and Behavioral (SAAB) Hypothesis proposes that the swimming capabilities and sensorial acuity of temperate fish larvae allows them to find and swim towards coastal nursery areas, which are crucial for their recruitment. To gather further evidence to support this theory, it is necessary to understand how horizontal swimming capabili...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding processes that drive community recovery are needed to predict ecosystem trajectories and manage for impacts under increasing global threats. Yet, the quantification of community recovery in coral reefs has been challenging owing to a paucity of long-term ecological data and high frequency of disturbances. Here we investigate community...
Book
Full-text available
Presents real world best practice examples allowing the reader to gain new research ideas and compare their own research to that of their peers to improve on their own practices KEY FEATURES •The first book to cover estuaries and coastal seas worldwide, integrating theircommonality, their differences and solutions for sustainability. •Includes glob...
Chapter
This book and this synthesis address the pressing need for better management of coastal wetlands worldwide because these wetlands are disappearing at an alarming rate; in some countries the loss is 70%-80% in the last 50 years. Managing requires understanding. Although our understanding of the functioning of coastal wetland ecosystems has grown rap...
Article
What are coastal wetland ecosystems, what are their limits of distribution, and where do they exist in the overall coastal landscape? There are several general definitions for wetlands, but the Ramsar definition is likely the most broadly encompassing (http://www.ramsar. org/), whereas others are more focused definitions tailored to country-specifi...
Article
Microplastics are abundant in semi-enclosed seas, presumably because of local trapping. To investigate this trapping effect, we confronted the SLIM plastic oceanography model with field data of the distribution of microplastics in the Bohai Sea, China. Seven source locations were selected to reveal the fate of plastic debris from industrial and dom...
Article
Full-text available
Most coral reef fishes have a pelagic larval stage before recruiting to reefs. The survival of larvae and their subsequent recruitment can drive the dynamics of reef populations. Here we show that the recruitment of the snapper Lutjanus carponotatus to One Tree Island in the Capricorn Bunker Group, in the southern Great Barrier Reef, was highly var...
Article
Full-text available
The Serengeti will die if Kenya dams the Mara River—CORRIGENDUM - Volume 52 Issue 1 - Bakari Mnaya, Mtango G.G. Mtahiko, Eric Wolanski
Chapter
This chapter assesses the response of mangrove ecosystems to possible outcomes of climate change, with regard to the following categories: (i) distribution, diversity, and community composition, (ii) physiology of flora and fauna, (iii) water budget, (iv) productivity and remineralization, (v) carbon storage in biomass and sediments, and (vi) the f...
Article
Full-text available
The Great Ruaha River (GRR) in Tanzania was perennial before 1993. Its source, the Usangu wetlands, was also perennial. Since then, the GRR has started drying out during the dry season, with a trend towards earlier and longer periods of drying. This drying process degrades the surrounding ecosystems along the entire length of the GRR, including the...
Article
The potentially lethal Chironex fleckeri (Class Cubozoa) inhabits estuarine and nearshore coastal waters in the western Pacific. The spatial scales of connectivity between C. fleckeri populations are poorly understood. Biophysical modelling of Port Musgrave, a 17 × 21 km shallow bay in tropical Australia, was used to investigate the potential for c...
Article
The Serengeti will die if Kenya dams the Mara River - Volume 51 Issue 4 - Bakari Mnaya, Mtango G.G. Mtahiko, Eric Wolanski
Article
Full-text available
Using the LOICZ and the UEE models we estimated the nutrient budget in the Wami River estuary, Tanzania, to better understand the functioning of the ecosystem and assess its health. We found that during the wet season, when river flows are high, the residence time of the estuary is typically one day or less, and thus little of the riverine nutrient...
Article
The 2015/16 ENSO event increased the temperature of waters surrounding northeast Australia to above 30 °C, with large patches of water reaching 32 °C, for over two months, which led to severe bleaching of corals of the Northern Great Barrier Reef (NGBR). This study provides evidence gained from remote-sensing data, oceanographic data and oceanograp...
Article
The intrusion in Torres Strait of the Fly River plume polluted by mine tailings is an international water issue. To investigate the physical mechanisms involved in the intrusion process, numerical simulations were conducted to assess the relative influence of the bathymetry and the external forcing, namely the tides, the mean sea level slope across...
Article
Full-text available
The ability of individuals to actively control their movements, especially during the early life stages, can significantly influence the distribution of their population. Most marine turtle species develop oceanic foraging habitats during different life stages. However, flatback turtles (Natator depressus) are endemic to Australia and are the only...
Article
Interaction of tidal flow with a complex topography and bathymetry including headlands, islands, coral reefs and shoals create a rich submesoscale field of tidal jets, vortices, unsteady wakes, lee eddies and free shear layers, all of which impact marine ecology. A unique and detailed view of the submesoscale variability in a part of the Great Barr...
Chapter
Tidal wetlands are habitats dominated by a major type of vegetation, usually with underlying mud owing to their sheltered nature, and usually tolerant of brackish conditions. Hence, the term includes the saltmarshes (such as Spartina marshes), mangrove areas, upper estuarine alder and willow areas, reedbeds (such as Phragmites beds), as well as int...
Chapter
To benefit from ecohydrology implies we have a good knowledge of the ecological structure and functioning of estuarine environments and especially their interaction with the physical and biogeochemical processes. The ecological structure of any ecosystem refers to the characteristics at any one time whereas functioning refers to rate processes. The...
Chapter
Human demands and activities lead to changes in the natural system for which we then need solutions. This chapter presents several examples of ecohydrological solutions. This requires measures to prevent a deterioration of an estuary or to remediate this after it has occurred. Those measures can be grouped according to biological, chemical, and phy...
Chapter
The estuarine hydrodynamic regimes define the type of bed sediments and these, in turn, the fauna and flora both on the bed and in the water column. Sediments are mobile, and their dynamics occur at time scales of millennia (the geomorphological time scales), of the tides, of storms, of river floods, of the seasons, and of turbulence (seconds to mi...
Article
The net ecosystem metabolism in lagoons has often been estimated from the net budget of dissolved nutrients. Such is the case of the LOICZ estuarine biogeochemistry nutrient budget model that considers riverine dissolved nutrients, but not riverine detritus. However the neglect of detritus can lead to inconsistencies; for instance, it results in an...
Article
Recent advances in our understanding of the self-recruitment and connectivity of estuarine and coastal fauna and flora were made possible by an integration of physical oceanographic observations and modelling with results from studies of the behaviour of the seeds, eggs, larvae, propagules, juveniles and polyps, of population dynamics, microchemica...
Article
Full-text available
The reefs in Palau’s Nikko Bay live in seawater with low pH that is similar to conditions predicted for 2100 because of ocean acidification. Nevertheless, the reefs at Nikko Bay have high coral cover and high diversity. We hypothesize that the low-pH environment in Nikko Bay is caused by low flushing rates, which causes long-term isolation and loca...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological Engineering (or Ecoengineering) is increasingly used in estuaries to re-create and restore ecosystems degraded by human activities, including reduced water flow or land poldered for agricultural use. Here we focus on ecosystem recolonization by the biota and their functioning and we separate Type A Ecoengineering where the physico-chemic...
Article
Full-text available
The Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) project was established in 1993 as a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) to provide the science knowledge to answer “How will changes in land use, sea level and climate alter coastal systems, and what are the wider consequences?” In its first phase of operati...
Article
A series of complementary hypotheses have been proposed to explain the recruitment of marine and temperate pelagic fish larvae originated from pelagic eggs in coastal environments. In this review, we propose a new and complementary hypothesis describing the biophysical processes intervening in the recruitment of temperate fish larvae into estuaries...
Article
[Extract] In the Invited Feature Article in this issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, we are extremely grateful to Edward Barbier for performing the major task of increasing our awareness of the hazards and risks faced by all communities on low lying coasts but especially the poor, rural communities ( Barbier, 2015). Against a background...
Article
The importance of restoring and maintaining environmental flows for sustaining the ecosystem integrity of rivers has been recognized in policies and legal frameworks in many countries. However this is routinely not implemented in Tanzania as exemplified by the case of the Wami River estuary, which plays a vital role in processing riverine nutrients...
Article
Understanding the transport and fate of suspended sediment exported by rivers is crucial for the management of sensitive marine ecosystems. Sediment transport and fate can vary considerably depending on the geophysical characteristics of the coastal environment. Fine sediment transport was studied in a setting in between “open” (uninterrupted coast...
Book
Explains the workings of an estuarine ecosystem, quantifies the human impact on those processes, and proposes ecohydrology solutions. New/Changes to this edition • Each chapter has been updated with the latest scientific knowledge and case studies from the last 8 years since the 1st edition book was published. • Professor Mike Elliott has joined Pr...
Article
The present study provides evidence that large dams that trap riverine sediment, decrease significantly SPM within estuaries, making them less turbid and less of a particulate trap for phosphorus adsorption. The study gives science-based insights for a future integrated estuarine water management in the Yangtze (Changjiang) Estuary. The hindsight f...
Article
Full-text available
Here we utilize a combination of genetic data, oceanographic data, and local ecological knowledge to assess connectivity patterns of the ornate spiny lobster Panulirus ornatus (Fabricius, 1798) in the South-East Asian archipelago from Vietnam to Australia. Partial mitochondrial DNA control region and 10 polymorphic microsatellites did not detect ge...
Article
This book “Estuaries of Australia in 2050 and Beyond” in the series “Estuaries of the World” addresses the question: Is Australia’s growing human population and economy environmentally sustainable for its estuaries and coasts by 2050? To answer this question, this chapter summarises detailed studies of a number of iconic Australian estuaries and ba...