Eric D. Wilkey

Eric D. Wilkey
Western University, London, Canada · Brain and Mind Institute

PhD

About

24
Publications
8,914
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302
Citations
Introduction
Eric D. Wilkey currently works at the Numerical Cognition Lab as a postdoc at Western University. Eric does research in the Developmental and Cognitive Neuroscience related to Numeracy, Math Learning Disability, and Mathematics Education.

Publications

Publications (24)
Preprint
Full-text available
Math performance is negatively related to math anxiety (MA), though MA may impact certain math skills more than others. We investigated whether the relation between MA and math performance is affected by task features, such as number type (e.g., fractions, whole numbers, percentages), number format (symbolic vs. non-symbolic), and ratio component s...
Article
The ability to efficiently compare number symbols, such as digits, is associated with mathematics competence across the lifespan. Performance on symbolic number comparison tasks differ across age groups; young students who are developing fluency with digits improve on symbolic number comparison, and performance is better in adults than children. Ho...
Article
Full-text available
During the COVID-19 pandemic, people across the globe have been exposed to large amounts of statistical data. Previous studies have shown that individuals' mathematical understanding of health-related information affects their attitudes and behaviours. Here, we investigate the relation between (i) basic numeracy, (ii) COVID-19 health numeracy, and...
Article
A critical goal of cognitive neuroscience is to predict behavior from neural structure and function, thereby providing crucial insights into who might benefit from clinical and/or educational interventions. Across development, the strength of functional connectivity among a distributed set of brain regions is associated with children's math skills....
Article
Children's ability to discriminate nonsymbolic number (e.g. the number of items in a set) is a commonly studied predictor of later math skills. Number discrimination improves throughout development, but what drives this improvement is unclear. Competing theories suggest it may be due to a sharpening numerical representation or an improved ability t...
Preprint
The human brain comprises multiple canonical networks, several of which are distributed across frontal, parietal, and temporooccipital regions. Studies report both positive and negative correlations between children’s math skills and the strength of functional connectivity among these regions during math-related tasks and at rest. Yet, it is unclea...
Article
Full-text available
Debate continues on whether encoding of symbolic number is grounded in nonsymbolic numerical magnitudes. Nevertheless, fluency of perceiving both number formats, and translating between them, predicts math skills across the life span. Therefore, this study asked if numbers share cortical activation patterns across formats and tasks, and whether neu...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of brain activity during number processing suggest symbolic and nonsymbolic numerical stimuli (e.g., Arabic digits and dot arrays) engage both shared and distinct neural mechanisms. However, the extent to which number format influences large-scale functional network organization is unknown. In this study, using 7 Tesla MRI, we adopted a net...
Article
Full-text available
A significant body of research links individual differences in symbolic numerical abilities, such as arithmetic, to number sense, the neurobiological system used to approximate and manipulate quantities without language or symbols. However, recent findings from cognitive neuroscience challenge this influential theory. Our current review presents an...
Article
Full-text available
Deficits in numerical magnitude perception characterize the mathematics learning disability developmental dyscalculia (DD), but recent studies suggest the relation stems from inhibitory control demands from incongruent visual cues in the nonsymbolic number comparison task. This study investigated the relation among magnitude perception during diffe...
Conference Paper
There is a longstanding debate regarding the extent to which symbolic (e.g. Arabic digits) and nonsymbolic (e.g. dot arrays) numbers engage shared versus distinct neural mechanisms. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have almost exclusively assessed regional activation with only a few evaluating functional connectivity vi...
Article
Recent studies suggest that the relation between nonsymbolic magnitude processing skills and math competence is mediated by symbolic number processing. However, less is known about whether mapping between nonsymbolic and symbolic magnitude representations also mediates that relation, and whether the mediating role of symbolic number processing is e...
Article
The development of math skills is a critical component of early education and a strong indicator of later school and economic success. Recent research utilizing population-normed, standardized measures of math achievement suggest that structural and functional integrity of parietal regions, especially the intraparietal sulcus, are closely related t...
Article
A growing body of research suggests that the processing of nonsymbolic (e.g. sets of dots) and symbolic (e.g. Arabic digits) numerical magnitudes serves as a foundation for the development of math competence. Performance on magnitude comparison tasks is thought to reflect the precision of a shared cognitive representation, as evidence by the presen...
Article
Full-text available
The present study investigates the relation between resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of cytoarchitectonically defined subdivisions of the parietal cortex at the end of 1st grade and arithmetic performance at the end of 2nd grade. Results revealed a dissociable pattern of relations between rsFC and arithmetic competence among subdivision...
Article
Full-text available
This Campbell systematic review examines the effectiveness of technical and vocational education intervention (‘TVET’) in developing countries on employment and employability outcomes of young people. The review summarises findings from 26 studies conducted in Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe, East Asia, South Asia and sub‐Saharan Africa. Parti...

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