Eric B Taylor

Eric B Taylor
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Zoology and Biodiversity Research Centre, Beaty Biodiversity Museum

PhD

About

224
Publications
38,963
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12,147
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 1993 - present
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (224)
Article
Full-text available
Physiological stress may induce sublethal effects on fitness by limiting energy availability and shifting energy allocation, which can incur reproductive costs. Sublethal reproductive costs may affect vital rates, linking stress events such as heat waves to population demography. Here, we test the hypothesis that heat wave intensity and consecutive...
Article
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Use of extensive but low‐resolution abundance data is common in the assessment of species at‐risk status using quantitative decline criteria under IUCN and national endangered species legislation. Such data can be problematic for three reasons. First, statistical power to reject the null hypothesis of no change is often low because of small sample...
Article
Full-text available
Background Identifying ecologically significant phenotypic traits and the genomic mechanisms that underly them are crucial steps in understanding traits associated with population divergence. We used genome-wide data to identify genomic regions associated with key traits that distinguish two ecomorphs of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss )—insect...
Article
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The Salish sucker (Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus) is a federally Threatened species in Canada, inhabiting small lowland streams along with juvenile Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in southwestern British Columbia and adjacent Washington State. Experiments were conducted in two ponds to determine the effects of reduced flow on dissolved oxygen (D...
Article
A mixed‐stock fishery occurs when multiple populations of a fish species are exploited together in a common area where they aggregate outside the breeding season (e.g. for feeding or overwintering), and the aggregation is known as a mixture. Recreational fishing often exploits such mixtures, and estimating the proportional contributions of populati...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Identifying ecologically significant phenotypic traits and the genomic mechanisms that underly them are crucial steps in understanding the traits associated with population divergence. We used genome-wide data to identify genomic regions associated with a key trait that distinguishes two ecotypes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) –...
Article
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Graylings (Thymallus) are among the less well-studied groups of salmonid fishes, especially across their Asian distribution range. Here we perform a comprehensive global review of their phylogeography, systematic diversity and range distributions, including biogeographic reconstruction and assessment of both conservation and taxonomic status of eac...
Article
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Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) is a commercially and culturally important species to the people that live along the northern Pacific Ocean coast. There are two main sockeye salmon ecotypes-the ocean-going (anadromous) ecotype and the fresh-water ecotype known as kokanee. The goal of this study was to better understand the population structure...
Article
Here, we describe the biological and ecological differences between partially anadromous Dolly Varden and riverine stone charr distributed in the Kamchatka River middle course. Endemic stone charr, being the ambush predator, is defined by the accelerated growth and prolonged lifespan, robust body, and large mouth, as well as specific marble colorat...
Article
Although logistically challenging to study, the Arctic is a bellwether for global change and is becoming a model for questions pertinent to the persistence of biodiversity. Disruption of Arctic ecosystems is accelerating, with impacts ranging from mixing of biotic communities to individual behavioral responses. Understanding these changes is crucia...
Article
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Genetic mixture analysis is an important tool to apportion catch amongst potential component populations contributing to a fishery. We used variation at 10 microsatellite DNA loci to assess the level of genetic divergence between two ecotypes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that naturally co-occur in Kootenay Lake, southeastern British Colum...
Article
As humans cause the redistribution of species ranges, hybridization between previously allopatric species is on the rise. Such hybridization can have complex effects on overall fitness of native species as new allelic combinations are tested. Widespread species introductions provide a unique opportunity to study selection on introgressed alleles in...
Article
Aquatic species represent a vast diversity of metazoans, provide humans with the most abundant animal protein source, and are of increasing conservation concern, yet landscape genomics is dominated by research in terrestrial systems. We provide researchers with a roadmap to plan aquatic landscape genomics projects by aggregating spatial and softwar...
Article
• Anthropogenic factors such as land‐use change, pollution, and climate change can cause fragmentation and reduce the amount of habitat by altering preferred conditions. This process can also bring about novel species interactions and, in some cases, create or alter levels of hybridisation between closely related species. We assessed the threat of...
Article
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Human‐mediated hybridization between introduced and native species is one of the most serious threats to native taxa. Although field studies have attempted to quantify the relative fitness or reproductive success of parental species and their hybrids, only a few studies have unraveled the factors determining the fitness of hybrids. Here, we hypothe...
Article
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Genomic extinction occurs when the unique combination of genetic traits that characterize distinct phenotypes are eliminated by introgressive hybridization even if population size is greater than zero. Benthic and limnetic threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) constitute reproductively isolated undescribed biological species that have ev...
Article
Heat waves, i.e., periods of extremely hot weather, are expected to increase in frequency and duration under climate change. Repeated exposure to thermal stress events such as heat waves can affect population dynamics and even population persistence. Understanding whether recent thermal history bolsters or hinders demographic responses such as surv...
Article
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Understanding the movement ability and the spatial scale(s) of population genetic structure of species can together better ‘tune’ management objectives to prevent potential range contraction and population declines. We studied the Rocky Mountain Sculpin (Cottus sp.), a threatened species in Canada, to demonstrate the utility of using two complement...
Article
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Census population size (Nc) is crucial to the development of resource management strategies, however, monitoring the effective population size (Ne) of managed populations has proliferated because of this parameter’s relationship to the short-term impacts of genetic stochasticity and long-term population viability. Thus, having a sound understanding...
Article
The Coho Salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, is one of seven species of Pacific salmon and trout native to northeastern Pacific Ocean watersheds. The species is typically anadromous; adults reproduce in fresh water where juveniles reside for 1–2 years before seaward migration after which the majority of growth occurs in the ocean before maturation at 2–4...
Article
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The Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) species “complex” has fascinated biologists for decades particularly with respect to how many species there are and their geographic distributions. I review recent research on the species complex, focussing on biodiversity within northwestern North America, which indicates (i) what was once considered a single t...
Article
Ecological speciation occurs when populations evolve reproductive isolation as a result of divergent natural selection. This isolation can be influenced by many potential reproductive barriers, including selection against hybrids, selection against migrants, and assortative mating. How and when these barriers act and interact in nature is understoo...
Article
Full-text available
Pacific trout Oncorhynchus spp. in western North America are strongly valued in ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural views, and have been the subject of substantial research and conservation efforts. Despite this, the understanding of their evolutionary histories, overall diversity, and challenges to their conservation is incomplete. We review t...
Article
Full-text available
The trophic ecology (diet and head morphology) and migration patterns of two closely related salmonid fishes, Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus (L., 1758)) and Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma (Walbaum, 1792)), were examined in tributaries of Lake Aleknagik, southwestern Alaska, to test for differentiation between species. Schoener’s index of proportio...
Article
Full-text available
Hybridization has been documented in a many different pairs of cetacean species both in captivity and in the wild. The widespread occurrence of hybridization indicates that postmating barriers to interbreeding are incomplete within the order Cetacea, and therefore raises questions about how species integrity is maintained in the face of interspecif...
Data
Table S1. Values for key morphological, ecological and behavioural traits in 78 species obtained from literature and literature reviews. Table S2. Survey Template for Professional Opinion of Strength of Driving Factors Table S3. Eigenvectors of the first four principal components of variation in similarity of traits for all cetacean species compa...
Article
The Nooksack dace (Pisces: an undescribed putative taxon within Rhinichthys) and longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) are two forms within the R. cataractae species complex that are distinguishable from one another by mitochondrial (mt) DNA divergence of 2–3%, as well as by subtle morphological differences. The two forms are found in allopatry in...
Article
Full-text available
AimsWe investigated post-glacial recolonization of the North American Arctic by Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and examined potential hybridization between different glacial lineages upon secondary contact.LocationNorth American Arctic and adjacent areas.Methods We collected mtDNA sequence data from 1355 individuals from 110 sampling locations an...
Article
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The longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae (Valenciennes, 1842); Cyprinidae) is one of the most widespread freshwater fishes in North America, and across its range there have been several divergent forms described that are of uncertain taxonomic status. One of these forms, the Nooksack dace, is found in southwestern British Columbia and adjacent por...
Article
Understanding the extent of interspecific hybridization and how ecological segregation may influence hybridization requires comprehensively sampling different habitats over a range of life history stages. Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and Dolly Varden (S. malma) are recently diverged salmonid fishes that come into contact in several areas of the...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the extent of interspecific hybridization and how ecological segregation may influence hybridization requires comprehensively sampling different habitats over a range of life history stages. Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and Dolly Varden (S. malma) are recently diverged salmonid fishes that come into contact in several areas of the...
Article
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Kokanee and sockeye salmon are the freshwater-resident and anadromous forms, respectively, of Oncorhynchus nerka. Unique populations of “black” kokanee are found in Lake Saiko, Japan, and in Anderson and Seton lakes in the southwestern interior of British Columbia. They are distinct from other populations of O. nerka in that black kokanee display b...
Article
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The Northern Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma malma) displays variable life-history types and occupies freshwater habitats with varying levels of connectivity. Here, we assayed microsatellite DNA variation in Northern Dolly Varden from the western Canadian Arctic to resolve landscape and life history variables driving variation in genetic diversity a...
Article
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Contact zones between divergent lineages of aquatic taxa have been described from the northeastern Pacific Ocean. We surveyed samples of Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) from their North American range for variation at 14 microsatellite DNA loci. After accounting for hybridization between Dolly Varden and co-occurring bull trout (Salvelinus confluen...
Article
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The concept of the designatable unit (DU) affords a practical approach to identifying diversity below the species level for conservation prioritization. However, its suitability for defining conservation units in ecologically diverse, geographically widespread, and taxonomically challenging species complexes has not been broadly evaluated. The Lake...
Article
Dam construction and reservoir formation represent profound anthropogenic alterations to natural riverscapes, especially in terms of connectivity in migratory fishes. The Peace River in northeastern British Columbia (BC), Canada, is the largest river system in BC, home to 39 native fishes and currently has two major hydroelectric projects, and a th...
Article
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We used variation at microsatellite loci and in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to detect and quantify (1) hybridization between the harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena and the Dall's porpoises Phoconoides dalli and (2) the genetic population structure of harbour porpoises in British Columbia (BC), Canada. We assayed variation across 262 individuals (204...
Article
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Range expansion in north-temperate fishes subsequent to the retreat of the Wisconsinan glaciers has resulted in the rapid colonization of previously unexploited, heterogeneous habitats and, in many situations, secondary contact among conspecific lineages that were once previously isolated. Such ecological opportunity coupled with reduced competitio...
Article
Hybridization between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum, 1792)) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi (Girard, 1856)) occurs commonly when rainbow trout are introduced into the range of westslope cutthroat trout. Typically, hybridization is most common in warmer, lower elevation habitats, but much less common in colde...
Conference Paper
The conservation status of Canada’s 193 native freshwater fish species has been assessed using a variety of methods. COSEWIC has assessed over 100 species, of which 54 species were listed at the level of Special Concern or higher. Of these 54 species, 39 have been subsequently listed under the federal Species at Risk Act. In 2008, the AFS Conservat...
Conference Paper
There are 209 freshwater fish species in Canada. Of those species, 193 are native and 16 have been introduced into Canada and become established. Native freshwater fish diversity generally exhibits a latitudinal gradient and is greatest in the southern Great Lakes basin. The current distribution of freshwater fishes in Canada is the result of postg...
Article
We isolated and characterized a total of 48 microsatellite loci in Rhinichthys cataractae a widely distributed freshwater fish that may contain several cryptic species. Loci were screened in 24 individuals from several areas of British Columbia, Canada. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 5 to 24, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.250 t...
Article
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Resource polymorphism may play an important role in the process of speciation. The Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) exhibits great phenotypic and genetic diversity across its range, making it an ideal species for studies of resource polymorphism and divergence. Here, we investigated genetic variation at 11 microsatellite loci among 287 Arctic char...
Article
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The pygmy whitefish (Prosopium coulterii (Eigenmann and Eigenmann, 1892)) is a glacial relict species with a disjunct North American distribution that, apart from its most easterly known location in Lake Superior, is predominantly found in northern and western regions of Canada. Here we report on a new finding of pygmy whitefish from Winnange Lake...
Article
Understanding the factors that influence larval dispersal and connectivity among marine populations is critical to the conservation and sustainable management of marine resources. We assessed genetic subdivision among ten populations of copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) representing paired samples of outer coast and the heads of inlets in five re...
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Article
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Assessments of fine-scale population structure in natural populations are important for understanding aspects of ecology, life history variation and evolutionary history and can provide novel insights into resource management. Although Arctic char, Salvelinus alpinus, represent one of the most culturally and commercially important salmonids in the...
Article
Understanding the mechanisms of coexistence of sperm-dependent asexuals and their sexual hosts requires an empirical evaluation of their relative fitness. We evaluated the fecundity, egg viability, and hatchling growth rate of the sperm-dependent asexual hybrid species Phoxinus eos-neogaeus and its sexually-reproducing parental species, P. eos and...
Article
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Dispersal can influence the process of local adaptation, particularly when the dispersers successfully breed in the non-natal habitat. Anadromous Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) display a complex migratory behaviour that makes the distinction between breeding and nonbreeding dispersal especially important. This species does not reproduce every yea...