Eric Struyf

Eric Struyf
University of Antwerp | UA · Department of Biology

PhD in Biology

About

126
Publications
30,497
Reads
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4,192
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
2174 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - present
University of Antwerp
Position
  • Project Manager
October 2013 - present
University of Antwerp
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (126)
Article
Full-text available
Quantifying and analyzing leaching water is essential to understand water and nutrient cycles and the vertical transport of elements through soils. Zero Tension Lysimeters (ZTLs) have been widely used to capture the soil solution leaching by gravity. This study designed and evaluated a 3D‐printed ZTL (ZTL3D) with specific characteristics and materi...
Article
A number of negative emission technologies (NETs) have been proposed to actively remove CO 2 from the atmosphere, with enhanced silicate weathering (ESW) as a relatively new NET with considerable climate change mitigation potential. Models calibrated to ESW rates in lab experiments estimate the global potential for inorganic carbon sequestration by...
Article
Full-text available
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have significantly contributed to weathering of the earth's surface since their evolutionary origin 400–500 million years ago. They have been a key player in the global carbon cycle over geological timescales. In order to reach the global warming targets as agreed at the Paris summit in 2015, implementation of negative...
Article
Full-text available
Dissolved Si (DSi) provision from land systems triggers diatom growth and CO2 sequestration. Soils and ecosystems act as a Si “filter”, transforming DSi originated from mineral weathering into biogenic Si (BSi) after DSi uptake by plants, or into other pedogenic forms of Si (non-BSi). Land use changes the quantity of BSi and non-BSi pools along the...
Article
Full-text available
The weathering of silicates is a major control on atmospheric CO2 at geologic timescales. It was proposed to enhance this process to actively remove CO2 from the atmosphere. While there are some studies that propose and theoretically analyze the application of rock powder to agricultural land, results from field experiments are still scarce. In ord...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Applying phytolith-rich biochar in agricultural soils increases soil pH, and the contents of plant nutrients and bioavailable silicon (Si). These increase induce positive impacts on plant growth, but hide the ones generated by Si uptake. Here we compare the effects of wollastonite (CaSiO3) and two biochars on Si bioavailability and mineralomass of...
Article
Full-text available
Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a high-throughput technology with potential to infer nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and carbon (C) content of all vascular plants based on empirical calibrations with chemical analysis, but is currently limited to the sample populations upon which it is based. Here we provide a first step towards a global arctic-a...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Supplying phytolith-rich biochar in agrosystems increases soil pH, CEC and nutrient availability, adding to the impact of Si uptake on plant growth. Here we studied this specific impact as influenced by soil properties, and assessed the role of phytoliths to provide plant available Si. Methods We used a young Cambisol and a highly weathered,...
Article
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While the importance of grasslands in terrestrial silicon (Si) cycling and fluxes to rivers is established, the influence of large grazers has not been considered. Here, we show that hippopotamuses are key actors in the savannah biogeochemical Si cycle. Through a detailed analysis of Si concentrations and stable isotope compositions in multiple eco...
Article
Full-text available
The weathering of silicates is a major control on atmospheric CO2 at geologic time scales. It was proposed to enhance this process to actively remove CO2 from the atmosphere. While there are some studies that propose and theoretically analyze the application of rock powder on agricultural land, results from field experiments are still scarce. In or...
Article
Full-text available
Land use change (deforestation) has several negative consequences for the soil system. It is known to increase erosion rates, which affect the distribution of elements in soils. In this context, the crucial nutrient Si has received little attention, especially in a tropical context. Therefore, we studied the effect of land conversion and erosion in...
Article
The role of in-stream aquatic vegetation as ecosystem engineers in the distribution of organic matter was investigated in the Okavango Delta, one of the world’s largest oligotrophic wetlands. The Okavango channel beds are covered up to 50% with submerged macrophyte patches. By accumulating and concentrating organic matter in the sediments below the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Biochar used as soil amendment can enhance soil fertility and plant growth. It may also contribute to increase the plant mineralomass of silicon (Si). However, very little studies have focused on the plant Si cycling in biochar amended soils. Here, we study the impact of two contrasting biochars derived from rice straws on soil Si availability and...
Article
Full-text available
Citation: Schaller, J., M. J. Hodson, and E. Struyf. 2017. Is relative Si/Ca availability crucial to the performance of grassland ecosystems? Ecosphere 8(3): Abstract. Species composition of grasslands and pastures is an important control on biomass production and ecological functioning, with a significant role of grasses and legumes. A change in c...
Article
Full-text available
Land use change (deforestation) has several negative consequences for the soil system. It is known also to increase the erosion rate which affects the distribution of elements in soils. In this context, the crucial nutrient Si has received little attention, especially in a tropical context. Therefore we studied the effect of land conversion and ero...
Article
Full-text available
Water chemistry is important for the maintenance of wetland structure and function. Interpreting ecological patterns in a wetland system therefore requires an in-depth understanding of the water chemistry of that system. We investigated the spatial distribution of chemical solutes both in soil pore water and surface water, along island-floodplain-c...
Article
Full-text available
Wetlands fed by rivers can be a sink for elements depending on elemental concentrations, wetland hydrology, geochemistry, vegetation and climate. In the case of the Okavango Delta, northern Botswana, the outflow discharge is a small fraction (2–5%) of the inflow. This has strong potential consequences for the Delta, as it strongly affects element c...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic eutrophication of wetlands may have a significant impact on the global biogeochemical silicon (Si) cycle, as Si filtering by wetland vegetation codetermines fluxes of Si towards the oceans. We experimentally investigated how macronutrient (NPK) enrichment alters total Si storage and Si stoichiometry in litter from six wetland species...
Article
We test the hypothesis that rich occurrences of diatoms observed at transitions between major peat units representing different vegetation communities in a peat sequence from subarctic northern Sweden reflect responses to acid deposition from the Samalas AD 1257 and Laki AD 1783/1784 eruptions. We observe sudden changes in the mire ecosystem and th...
Article
Full-text available
Silica is an essential element for marine life and plays a key role in the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Glacial activity stimulates rock weathering, generating dissolved silica that is exported to coastal areas along with meltwater. The magnitude of the dissolved silica export from large glacial areas such as the Greenland Ice Sheet is presently p...
Article
Diatoms are important primary producers in lake ecosystems and, as a sink for dissolved (DSi) and biogenic silica (BSi) originating from land, can significantly impact the global Si cycle. After burial in lake sediments, resistant diatom frustules can also be used for reconstructions of past ecosystem change. The BSi content of lake sediments is th...
Research
Full-text available
This document contains a short summary and a link to a documentary on YouTube about an expedition to the Okavango Delta in Botswana.
Chapter
In tall fescue breeding, a great deal of effort is devoted to develop soft-leaved varieties as it is generally accepted that leaf softness is positively correlated with digestibility and animal preference. In advanced breeding programs, it becomes difficult to discriminate the leaf softness between genotypes. Moreover, there is evidence that the di...
Chapter
An important disadvantage of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is its low voluntary intake, resulting in suboptimal performances of cattle grazing tall fescue. Ideally selection for this trait is done by animals themselves, but the use of grazing animals in large breeding programmes is laborious. Repeatable, stable and quantifiable paramete...
Article
Silicon (Si) use by plants has not always received the research attention of other elements. Yet today, the importance of Si for plant functioning is slowly becoming better understood. Si is a crucial element for many terrestrial plant species (especially grasses), yet a recent surge of research has shown that some species of aquatic plants contain...
Article
Besides well-known effects of climate and parent material on silicate weathering the role of land use change as a driver in the global silicon cycle is not well known. Changes in vegetation cover have altered reservoirs of silicon and carbon in plants and soils. This has potential consequences for plant-Si availability, agricultural yields, and coa...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT: Suspension-feeding mussels exert top-down grazing control on primary producers, and provide bottom-up feedback of regenerated nutrients. Besides direct excretion, an important pathway of nutrient regeneration is through the decomposition of feces and pseudofeces, of which mussels can produce large quantities. Information on mussel feces a...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The main objective of this study is to enhance our knowledge about the interplay between the plant Si content and the plant nutrient content as well as the nutrient stoichiometry for a broad range of submerged and emergent wetland plants. Methods We investigated the carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon content of 16 species (10 submerge...
Article
Full-text available
Biogenic silica (BSi) is used as a proxy by soil scientists to identify biological effects on the Si cycle and by palaeoecologists to study environmental changes. Alkaline extractions are typically used to measure BSi in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. The dissolution properties of volcanic glass in tephra deposits and their nanocrystall...
Article
The biogeochemical cycling of silicon (Si) along the land-to-ocean continuum is studied by a variety of research fields and for a variety of scientific reasons. However, there is an increasing need to refine the methodology and the underlying assumptions used to determine biogenic silica (BSi) concentrations. Recent evidence suggests that contribut...
Article
Full-text available
Despite increasing recognition of the relevance of biological cycling for Si cycling in ecosystems and for Si export from soils to fluvial systems, effects of human cultivation on the Si cycle are still relatively understudied. Here we examined stable Si isotope (d 30 Si) signatures in soil water samples across a temperate land use gradient. We sho...
Article
In recent years it has become increasingly clear that two-way interactions between organisms and landscape-forming processes play a key role in the evolution of many aquatic ecosystems. To be able to compare sedimentation processes among different environments, a standardised method that is generally applicable is necessary. Current methods are usu...
Article
Full-text available
Diffuse phosphorus (P) export from agricultural land to surface waters is a significant environmental problem. It is critical to determine the natural background P losses from diffuse sources, but their identification and quantification is difficult. In this study, three headwater catchments with differing land use (arable, pasture and forest) were...
Article
Full-text available
Biogenic silica (BSi) is used as a proxy by soil scientists to identify biological effects on the Si cycle and by paleoecologists to study environmental changes. Alkaline extractions are typically used to measure BSi in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. The dissolution properties of volcanic glass in tephra deposits and their nano-crystall...
Article
Full-text available
The response of aquatic plants to abiotic factors is a crucial study topic, because the diversity of aquatic vegetation is strongly related to specific adaptations to a variety of environments. This biodiversity ensures resilience of aquatic communities to new and changing ecological conditions. In running water, hydrodynamic disturbance is one of...
Article
Amorphous silica (ASi) carried in suspension by rivers is an important component in the global Si budget. Water erosion processes in cultivated catchments are likely to drive ASi delivery to the river system. However, no studies have investigated the controls on ASi mobilisation by erosional processes in croplands. Rainfall experiments were perform...
Article
Full-text available
Water quality is affected by a complex combination of natural and anthropogenic factors. To assess watershed integrity on a larger scale and for an optimal, cost-effective integrated watershed management, defining linkages between upstream watershed land cover and riverine water quality is essential. A correct upstream area calculation is an absolu...
Article
Full-text available
Despite increasing recognition of the relevance of biological cycling for Si cycling in ecosystems and for Si export from soils to fluvial systems, effects of human cultivation on the Si cycle are still relatively understudied. Here we examined stable Si isotope (δ(30)Si) signatures in soil water samples across a temperate land use gradient. We sho...
Article
Full-text available
Basaltic weathering from volcanic islands plays a critical role in the climate feedback loop. Geochemical and climate models require information on the rate of secondary mineral formation. We provide direct evidence for precipitation of amorphous Si in organic rich and acidic Histic Andosols compared to preferential allophane formation in organic p...
Article
Full-text available
In the last decades the application of rock powder or comparable products on soils has increased in agriculture areas leading to additional release of elements and alteration of soil solutions and saturation states of solutes. In the future this practice will continue and areas affected will spread. This trend will likely be fuelled by attempts to...
Article
Fire can have large effects on ecosystems, with phosphorus being highly important in this regard, especially when considering productivity in burned or adjacent ecosystems after fire. Unfortunately, existing data pose contradictions and methodological challenges to assessing P availability. Here, the impact of fire on topsoil available P was estima...
Article
Aquatic plants (macrophytes) can have a large effect on river hydraulics and geomorphology. However, the extent to what plant morphological plasticity actively influences these feedbacks has received little scientific attention. The nymphaeid macrophyte species Nuphar lutea (L.) Smith is characterised by a distinct leaf duality. Floating leaves sha...
Article
Chemical weathering of silicate minerals releases elements into solution whereas the neoformation of secondary minerals works in the opposite direction, potentially confounding estimates of silicate weathering rates. Silicon isotopes (δ30Si) may be a useful tool to investigate these processes. Here, we present 82 δ30Si measurements from surface wat...
Article
Full-text available
Silicon (Si) is one of the most common elements in the earth bedrock, and its continental cycle is strongly biologically controlled. Yet, research on the biogeochemical cycle of Si in ecosystems is hampered by the time and cost associated with the currently used chemical analysis methods. Here, we assessed the suitability of Near Infrared Reflectan...
Article
The primary source of dissolved silicon (Si: DSi) is the weathering of silicate minerals. In recent years, it has been shown that Si cycling through vegetation creates a more soluble Si pool in the soil, as amorphous Si (ASi) deposits in plants (phytoliths) are returned to the soil through litter. Amorphous Si accumulation in soils depends on a num...
Article
The controlled reduced tide system (CRT) is a new technique for restoring tidal marshes and is being tested in the Schelde estuary (Belgium). Biogeochemical processes within a CRT were hypothesized to support and improve several estuarine functions such as sediment trapping and nutrient burial. In 2006, the first pilot CRT was implemented in the fr...
Article
Full-text available
Dissolved organic C (DOC) plays an important role in the cycling and distribution of energy and nutrients. However, factors controlling the transport of DOC both within and between ecosystems are not clear. The aim of this work was to identify the contributing pathways for transport of DOC to surface water in catchments contrasting in land use and...
Article
Weathering of silicate minerals releases dissolved silicate (DSi) to the soil-vegetation system. Accumulation and recycling of this DSi by terrestrial ecosystems creates a pool of reactive Si on the continents that buffers DSi export to the ocean. Human perturbations to the functioning of the buffer have been a recent research focus, yet a common a...
Article
Full-text available
We assessed the role of vegetation and hydrology in the Si cycle in the Okavango Delta. Our results show a large storage of biogenic Si (BSi) in vegetation and the sediments. The biological storage is among the highest observed so far for any ecosystem worldwide. Floodplain vegetation accumulates similar amounts of BSi in both the temporary floodpl...
Article
Amorphous Silica (ASi) is present in considerable amounts in most soils and serves as a (micro-)nutrient for many plants. However, our understanding of the response of this important nutrient pool to human or natural disturbances is still very limited. One of the reasons for this is the long time scales involved. This explorative study focuses on t...
Article
Full-text available
Silicon (Si) is a key element in global biogeochemical cycling and recent research has shown that changes in the biological component of the Si cycle may lead to more rapid variations in the land–ocean Si transfer than previously thought. The objective of this paper is to better understand the controls on temporal Si dynamics in terrestrial ecosyst...
Article
Full-text available
Tidal oscillations systematically flood salt marshes, transporting water, sediments, organic matter, and biogeochemical elements such as silica. Here we present a review of recent studies on these fluxes and their effects on both ecosystem functioning and morphological evolution of salt marshes. We reexamine a simplified model for the computation o...
Article
Full-text available
As an essential nutrient for diatoms, silica plays a key role in the estuarine and coastal food web. High concentrations of dissolved silica (DSi) were found in the seepage water of tidal freshwater marshes, which were therefore assumed to contribute to the silica supply to estuarine waters in times of silica limitation. A comprehensive budget calc...
Article
Tidal marshes play an important role in the estuarine Si cycle. Dissolved silicon (DSi) is taken up by marsh diatom communities and by tidal marsh vegetation. Delivery of DSi back to the estuary after biogenic silica dissolution potentially increases the resilience of the estuary against harmful effects of DSi depletion events. Tidal freshwater mar...
Article
Full-text available
Silica is well known for its role as inducible defence mechanism countering herbivore attack, mainly through precipitation of opaline, biogenic silica (BSi) bodies (phytoliths) in plant epidermal tissues. Even though grazing strongly interacts with other element cycles, its impact on terrestrial silica cycling has never been thoroughly considered....
Article
Full-text available
The decomposition rate of plant litter is important for the carbon cycle. Element stoichiometry and hardly degradable carbon compounds are main factors controlling the decomposition rate of plant litter. Recent research has linked these factors to silicon availability during plant growth, but no research focused on the effect of silicon on litter d...
Article
In the European subarctic, river valleys and other moist zones are dominated by tall shrub tundra, dominated by willows. Although climate warming is generally hypothesized to result in an expansion of this shrub zone, intensive reindeer husbandry in Finnmark (Northern Fennoscandia) during the last three decades seems to have resulted in a "deshrubi...