Eric James Stokan

Eric James Stokan
University of Maryland, Baltimore County | UMBC · Department of Political Science

Ph.D., George Washington University

About

14
Publications
2,241
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
197
Citations
Introduction
Hello! My name is Eric Stokan and I am an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). I also teach in the public policy school. I completed my Ph.D. in the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy at The George Washington University. I study the political, economic, and social forces that lead local and state governments to use and abandon economic development incentives and the impact of those incentives on local economic indicators.
Additional affiliations
June 2015 - August 2015
RW Ventures, LLC
Position
  • Economic Development Consultant (Intern)
Description
  • I worked on a number of reports, presentations, and analyses on regionalism, regional economic growth, Foreign Direct Investment, Innovation Ecosystems, and Economic Development Policies.
June 2014 - August 2014
U.S. Census Bureau
Position
  • Statistician
Description
  • I worked as a Statistician within the Government's division. I tracked and analyzed fluctuations in state and local governmental assets, debts, expenditures, and revenues.
May 2014 - July 2014
George Washington University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Graduate-Level Cross-Sector Collaborations
Education
August 2011 - May 2016
George Washington University
Field of study
  • Public Policy and Public Administration
August 2005 - May 2007
Wayne State University
Field of study
  • Political Science
August 2003 - May 2005
Wayne State University
Field of study
  • Political Science

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Urban sustainability is a burgeoning focus for urban scholarship but rarely examined within the larger context of local government economic activities. Why should cities focusing on cutback management and competition for tax revenues be expected to devote all but the fleetest of attention to carbon footprints or metropolitan-wide environmental or s...
Article
This article empirically tests the impact of failing to account for state-level authorization when explaining the factors that lead municipalities to use tax abatements, tax increment financing, and enterprise zones. Although existing research implicitly assumes that state-level authorization exists, this article demonstrates that this unfounded as...
Article
This research examines whether business incubators produce a differential effect on the growth of firms. Given that there is no direct estimate for the counterfactual (simultaneously measuring the economic growth of a firm outside and inside of an incubator), the authors use a propensity score matching technique to control for the factors that are...
Article
Full-text available
The loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States has been widely noted in the popular press as well as in public policy debate. We examine several of the most prominently made assertions about manufacturing decline and its consequences for deindustrializing metropolitan areas and find not all of them supported by the data. In particular, we find...
Article
Full-text available
Rubin sounded an alarm indicating that economic development practitioners were less than strategic in their economic development incentive adoption when he declared that developers “shoot anything that flies, claim anything that falls.” This article builds on the work of those who have focused on the determinants of incentive adoption in three ways...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic pressured local governments to employ creative and untested economic development strategies to stabilize private businesses. To explore how the uncertainty of the pandemic impacted the priorities and strategies of economic development officials, we surveyed officials about their initial economic development response to the pan...
Article
Full-text available
Public managers serve many sovereigns, work within fiscal constraints, and face competing demands for finite resources. This article applies a strategic management lens to local government sustainability capabilities to examine the conditions under which local governments diversify into new areas of service delivery and when they do not. Building o...
Article
Economic development at the municipal level often necessitates that local governments make trade-offs between firm- and locality-based strategies. In recent decades, economic development researchers have described these efforts over time as exhibiting certain patterns and metaphors: as a series of waves, as embodying a type of lock-in effect, and a...
Article
Full-text available
COVID‐19 is exposing a nexus between communities disproportionately suffering from underlying health conditions, policy‐reinforced disparities, and susceptibility to the disease. As the virus spreads, policy responses will need to shift from focusing on surveillance and mitigation to recovery and prevention. Local governments, with their histories...
Article
At this point, little is known about local government responses to the economic crisis caused by COVID‐19. This crisis is happening on Main Streets around the nation. This article examines how some local governments are taking collective action in partnership with others as well as organizations at the local and regional levels. What is unique is t...
Article
Political fragmentation has been conceptualized as a phenomenon which increases competition for mobile citizens and jobs between local governments within the same region. However, the empirical basis for this nexus between governmental fragmentation and increased competition for development is surprisingly lacking. Utilizing a newly constructed dat...
Article
Public organizations have explored service-delivery with nonprofit organizations to help alleviate the strain on their long-term fiscal sustainability. This interdependence has ramifications for fairness and responsiveness in service-delivery that are poorly understood. One area where government-nonprofit collaborative activity has not been explore...
Article
Full-text available
This article argues that states that do not currently have a state-level Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) would benefit by adopting such a program. Relying on extensive literature, the article concludes that a state-level ETIC can effectively reduce poverty, especially among children; enhance employment by attracting new entrants into the labor mark...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
I have a few projects focused on understanding the interconnection between political fragmentation and the decision to use economic development policies. Initial support for this project came through the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy's junior scholar program and has been followed on by two grants through Towson University.