Eric D Stein

Eric D Stein
Southern California Coastal Water Research Project | SCCWRP · Department of Biology

Doctorate of Environmental Science and Engineering

About

164
Publications
40,315
Reads
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3,720
Citations
Citations since 2017
56 Research Items
2076 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400
Additional affiliations
June 1998 - June 2002
PCR Constultants
Position
  • Associate Principal
April 1993 - June 1998
US Army Corps of Engineers
Position
  • Sr. Project Manager
Education
September 1991 - June 1995
University of California, Los Angeles
Field of study
  • Environmental Science and Engineering
September 1987 - August 1988
September 1983 - June 1987

Publications

Publications (164)
Article
Full-text available
Coastal marsh within Mediterranean climate zones is exposed to episodic watershed runoff and sediment loads that occur during storm events. Simulating future marsh accretion under sea level rise calls for attention to: (a) physical processes acting over the time scale of storm events and (b) biophysical processes acting over time scales longer than...
Chapter
Full-text available
The book brings together a range of leading scholars and practitioners to compile an international account of water allocation policies supporting a transition to sustainable water use in regions where agriculture is the dominant water use. In Section 1, the collection canvasses five key crosscutting issues shaping the challenge of sustainable wate...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that incorporating ecosystem services (ES) in restoration effectiveness monitoring and assessment (REMA) is feasible, practical, and provides strategic value that can enhance the success of restoration projects. Ecosystem restoration is pursued for a variety of reasons, typically to improve the condition...
Article
Full-text available
Watersheds are often degraded by human activities, reducing their ability to provide ecosystem functions and services. While governmental agencies have put forward plans for improving watershed health, resources are limited, and choices must be made as to which watersheds to prioritize and what actions to take. Prioritization tools with sufficient...
Article
Full-text available
Flows in urban rivers are increasingly managed to support water supply needs while also protecting and/or restoring instream ecological functions, goals that are often in opposition to each other. Effluent-dominated rivers (i.e., rivers that consist primarily of discharged treated wastewater) pose a particular challenge because changes in effluent...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental flows are critical to the recovery and conservation of freshwater ecosystems worldwide. However, estimating the flows needed to sustain ecosystem health across large, diverse landscapes is challenging. To advance protections of environmental flows for streams in California, United States, we developed a statewide modeling approach foc...
Article
Full-text available
Flow alteration is a pervasive issue across highly urbanized watersheds that can impact the physical and biological condition of streams. In highly altered systems, flows may support novel ecosystems that may not have been found under natural conditions and reference-based environmental flow targets may not be relevant. Moreover, stream impairments...
Article
Full-text available
A key challenge in managing flow alteration is determining the severity and pattern of alteration associated with the degradation of biological communities. Understanding these patterns helps managers prioritize locations for restoration and flow management actions. However, the choices made about how to use these flow-ecology relationships can hav...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental flows, or the practice of allocating water in river systems for ecological purposes, is a leading strategy for conserving aquatic species and improving river health. However, consideration of surface-groundwater connectivity is seldom addressed in environmental flow development due to a lack of methodologies that account for groundwat...
Article
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Anthropogenic development has adversely affected river habitat and species diversity in urban rivers, and existing habitats are jeopardized by future uncertainties in water resources management and climate. The Los Angeles River (LAR), for example, is a highly modified system that has been mostly channelized for flood control purposes, has altered...
Preprint
Full-text available
Environmental streamflow management can improve the ecological health of streams by returning modified flows to more natural conditions. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework for developing regional environmental flow criteria has been implemented to reverse hydromodification across the heterogenous region of coastal sout...
Article
Full-text available
Large state or regional environmental flow programs, such as the one based on the California Environmental Flows Framework, rely on broadly applicable relationships between flow and ecology to inform management decisions. California, despite having high flow and bioassessment data density, has not established relationships between specific elements...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental flow programs aim to protect aquatic habitats and species while recognizing competing water demands. Often this is done at the local or watershed level because it is relatively easier to address technical and implementation challenges at these scales. However, a consequence of this approach is that ecological flow criteria are develop...
Article
Managing river temperature in highly urbanized stream systems is critical for maintaining aquatic ecosystems and associated beneficial uses. In this work, we updated and utilized a mechanistic river temperature model, i-Tree Cool River, to evaluate the cooling impacts of two ecological restoration scenarios: (1) an alternative streambed material li...
Article
Climate change will alter stream habitats through precipitation and air temperature changes and potentially threaten species that rely on contemporary streamflow and stream temperature regimes. Habitat projections are therefore critical to inform management decisions. Past and ongoing research has improved streamflow and temperature modeling in ung...
Article
Full-text available
The science needed to inform management of environmental flows to temporarily closed estuaries and coastal lagoons is decades behind the state of knowledge for rivers and large embayments. These globally ubiquitous small systems, which are often seasonally closed to the ocean’s influence, are under particular threat associated with hydrologic alter...
Article
Multi-decadal prediction of estuarine sedimentation with high-fidelity hydromorphodynamic models presents high computation costs, especially when accounting for stochasticity and uncertainty. A StochAstic model for Multi-decadaL Estuarine Sedimentation (SeAMLESS) is formulated here to support a specific decision-need related to resilience planning...
Article
Full-text available
Predictive biological indices have transformed the bioassessment landscape by allowing universal indices to be applicable across diverse environments. The successful development of a predictive benthic macroinvertebrate index for California wadeable streams helped to demonstrate the power of these tools in complex geographic settings. However, prev...
Article
Full-text available
Distributions of riparian species will likely shift due to climate change induced alterations in temperature and rainfall patterns, which alter stream habitat. Spatial forecasting of suitable habitat in projected climatic conditions will inform management interventions that support wildlife. Challenges in developing forecasts include the need to co...
Article
Full-text available
As urbanization and climate change alter sediment fluxes, relative sea level, and coastal erosion around the world, management of sediment as a resource is increasingly important. Sediment is needed to enhance marsh accretion rates, raise the grade elevation of development, and build up beaches and dunes. Beneficial reuse of sediment refers to the...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We present a report detailing a new three tiered bioassessment framework for submerged aquatic vegetation in California, as well as our initial efforts to develop methods and interpretation schemes for assessing Zostera marina ecological function in the context of an regional monitoring program.
Article
Molecular-based approaches can provide timely biodiversity assessments, showing an immense potential to facilitate decision-making in marine environmental management. However, the uptake of molecular data into environmental policy remains minimal. Here, we showcase a selection of local to global scale studies applying molecular-based methodologies...
Article
Full-text available
The 2015–2016 El Niño provided insight into how low-inflow estuaries might respond to future climate regimes, including high sea levels and more intense waves. High waves and water levels coupled with low rainfall along the Southern California coastline provided the opportunity to examine how extreme ocean forcing impacts estuaries independently fr...
Article
Regional approaches to coastal wetland restoration are one of the best ways to ensure that these threatened habitats persist in the face of sea level rise. Regional approaches provide a mechanism for prioritizing restoration actions in areas where future conditions will promote maximum resiliency while still providing for an appropriate composition...
Article
Full-text available
The science and practice of environmental flows have advanced significantly over the last several decades. Most environmental flow approaches require quantifying the relationships between hydrologic change and biologic response, but this can be challenging to determine and implement due to high data requirements, limited transferability, and the ab...
Article
Full-text available
Sizing stormwater runoff control facilities and their performance relies on the amount of runoff generated from impervious cover in the watershed. Total impervious area (TIA) often overestimates unit runoff values because it fails to account for intervening pervious surfaces which can reduce effective impervious area (EIA) below the TIA. While EIA...
Article
Full-text available
Stream management goals for biological integrity may be difficult to achieve in developed landscapes where channel modification and other factors constrain in-stream conditions. To evaluate potential constraints on biological integrity, we developed a statewide landscape model for California that estimates ranges of likely scores for a macroinverte...
Article
The aim of this study is to test a spatially explicit statistical model to identify indicators of natural stream flow using readily available stream, climate and landscape data. Understanding flow behavior of unmonitored streams at different temporal scales using environmental indicators is of great interest considering the logistic constraints of...
Article
Ecological monitoring of streams has frequently focused on measures describing the taxonomic, and sometimes functional, a diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates (BMIs) within a single sampled community. However, as many ecological processes effectively link BMI stream communities there is a need to describe groups of communities using measures of...
Article
River flows exert dominant controls on in-stream biota. Quantifying linkages between hydrology and biology is important for assessing the effects of flow alteration on ecological functions. Hydrologic models are often used to quantify these flow-ecology relationships and guide management actions. Traditional model calibration techniques typically f...
Article
Sea level rise (SLR) threatens coastal wetlands worldwide, yet the fate of individual wetlands will vary based on local topography, wetland morphology, sediment dynamics, hydrologic processes, and plant‐mediated feedbacks. Local variability in these factors makes it difficult to predict SLR effects across wetlands or to develop a holistic regional...
Article
Full-text available
Balancing ecological and human water needs often requires characterizing key aspects of the natural flow regime and then predicting ecological response to flow alterations. Flow metrics are generally relied upon to characterize long-term average statistical properties of the natural flow regime (hydrologic baseline conditions). However, some key as...
Conference Paper
The portion of the total impervious area (TIA) that is hydraulically connected to the storm drainage system is called the effective impervious area (EIA). The remaining portion of the TIA, called the non-effective impervious area, is not directly connected to drainage system and flows onto pervious areas. The use of the TIA percentage instead of th...
Article
Full-text available
• While the number of environmental flows and water science programmes continues to grow across the globe, there remains a critical need to better balance water availability in support of human and ecological needs and to recognise the environment as a legitimate user of water. In water‐stressed areas, this recognition has resulted in friction betw...
Article
Full-text available
• The implementation of environmental flow regimes offers a promising means to protect and restore riverine, wetland and estuarine ecosystems, their critical environmental services and cultural/societal values. • This Special Issue expands the scope of environmental flows and water science in theory and practice, offering 20 papers from academics,...
Article
Hydrologic alteration is a predominant stressor for biological resources in streams. This stress is further aggravated by competing human and ecological demands for limited water resources. Understanding flow-ecology relationships and establishing relevant and implementable flow targets are essential to protect biological communities. Estimating de...
Article
1. Widespread hydrologic alteration creates a need for tools to assess ecological impacts to streams that can be applied across large geographic scales. A regional framework for biologically based flow management can help catchment managers prioritise streams for protection, evaluate impacts of disturbance or interventions and provide a starting po...
Article
Hydromodification is a serious management concern in semiarid regions and is expected to become worse with land use and climate change. Potential stream channel responses range from increased or decreased sediment loads, incision, and dramatic nonequilibrated channel enlargements. The prevalence of hydromodification, particularly in semiarid region...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We are developing a method for rapid evaluation of California wetlands and riparian areas (the California Rapid Assessment Method, CRAM), which will provide cost-effective, science-based assessments of wetland condition and related stressors. Because site-specific CRAM assessments for a given wetland class are standardized and easily compiled acros...
Article
Biological assessment of aquatic resources requires the availability of bioassessment tools that work in all waterbody types and regions of interest. Developing new assessment tools may require several years of data collection and substantial investment of resources, which may not be an option for some aquatic resource managers. Adapting tools deve...
Article
Full-text available
Toxin producing cyanobacterial blooms have increased globally in recent decades in both frequency and intensity. Despite the recognition of this growing risk, the extent and magnitude of cyanobacterial blooms and cyanotoxin prevalence is poorly characterized in the heavily populated region of southern California. Recent assessments of lentic waterb...
Article
Relationships between changes in streamflow and changes in biological condition are important considerations for water resources management decisions. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework offers a way to protect stream health by managing flow conditions. We demonstrate application of a regionally derived ELOHA framework...
Article
Determining success of stream restoration projects is challenging, due to the disconnection between required monitoring periods and the actual time necessary to achieve ecological success. Performance curves could help address this challenge by illustrating likely developmental trajectories of restored streams. We applied the California Rapid Asses...
Article
Regional classification of streams is an early step in the Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework. Many stream classifications are based on an inductive approach using hydrologic data from minimally disturbed basins, but this approach may underrepresent streams from heavily disturbed basins or sparsely gaged arid regions. An a...
Article
Full-text available
Estimates of wetland and stream extent and distribution form the basis for state and federal monitoring and management programs and guide policy development decisions. The current default approach, comprehensive mapping, provides the most complete information on extent and distribution but is prohibitively expensive across large geographic areas. I...
Article
Many advances in the field of bioassessment have focused on approaches for objectively selecting the pool of reference sites used to establish expectations for healthy waterbodies, but little emphasis has been placed on ways to evaluate the suitability of the reference-site pool for its intended applications (e.g., compliance assessment vs ambient...
Article
Abstract: Regions with great natural environmental complexity present a challenge for attaining 2 key properties of an ideal bioassessment index: 1) index scores anchored to a benchmark of biological expectation that is appropriate for the range of natural environmental conditions at each assessment site, and 2) deviation from the reference benchma...
Article
Full-text available
Intermittent estuaries are temporarily open to exchange with the open ocean, and the influence of their entrance opening regime on hydrological and ecological function has received considerable attention. Here we consider the influence of tectonic, climatic and geomorphic controls on the distribution of estuarine habitats by contrasting two setting...
Article
Lentic water bodies and large rivers have long been recognized as being susceptible, under certain conditions, to toxin-producing (“toxigenic”) planktonic cyanobacterial blooms. Although benthic cyanobacteria commonly inhabit wadeable (i.e., shallow) streams, little has been published on the potential for cyanotoxin (e.g., microcystin) production i...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Monitoring and assessment strategies developed by the State of California and USEPA universally call for coordinated and consistent approaches. Unfortunately, our former ability to meet this goal was limited. Although progress has been made over the last decade in developing standardized rapid assessment methods (i.e. Level 2) for California, there...
Article
Full-text available
Wetlands have been consistently undervalued by society, and, arguably, this indicates a failure on the part of advocates of wetland conservation to present a convincing policy case for their protection, coupled with the reluctance of governments to implement international commitments for wetland conservation and wise use. Part of the challenge in d...
Article
This article explores governance issues in developing innovative pollutant offset programs by focusing on a case study being piloted at the Gisborne Recycled Water Plant in Jackson Creek, a rural subcatchment of the Maribyrnong River north of Melbourne, Australia. The article offers preliminary lessons from the ongoing design and anticipated challe...
Article
Evaluation of wetland extent and changes in extent is a foundation of many wetland monitoring and assessment programs. Probabilistic sampling and mapping provides a cost-effective alternative to comprehensive mapping for large geographic areas. One unresolved challenge for probabilistic or design-based approaches is how best to monitor both status...