Eric Plemons

Eric Plemons
The University of Arizona | UA · School of Anthropology

PhD

About

22
Publications
6,198
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129
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - present
The University of Arizona
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2012 - May 2015
University of Michigan
Position
  • Assistant Professor, Postdoctoral Fellow

Publications

Publications (22)
Chapter
To distinguish the phenotypic sex of a newborn, observers typically inspect the primary external genitalia and pronounce the child female, male, or intersex. Throughout maturation, and most notably during exposure to increased gonadal hormones during puberty, secondary sex characteristics develop (Table 10.1). These include the development of patte...
Article
Due to disproportionate violence impacting the transgender community, forensic anthropologists may encounter the remains of trans individuals; however, it is unknown how often trans individuals are represented in casework and if practitioners have sufficient knowledge about trans bodies. After contextualizing forensically relevant demographics for...
Article
Full-text available
Facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a set of bone and soft tissue procedures intended to feminize the faces of transgender women. In the surgical evaluation, particular facial features are identified as ‘sex specific’ and targeted for intervention as such. But those features do not exhibit ‘maleness’ or ‘femaleness’ alone; they are complexly entwi...
Article
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Since 2014, public and private insurance coverage for transgender Americans’ surgical care has increased exponentially. Training clinicians and equipping institutions to meet the surge in demand has not been as rapid. Through ethnographic research at a surgical workshop focused on trans‐ genital reconstruction and in a U.S. hospital working to grow...
Article
Full-text available
Facial gender confirmation surgery (FGCS), also popularly known and referred to in the scientific literature as facial feminization surgery (FFS), was previously treated as a collection of aesthetic procedures complementing other aspects of gender-confirming surgery. Recent literature on quality-of-life outcomes following FGCS has supported the sub...
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Full-text available
Facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a set of bone and soft tissue reconstructive surgical procedures intended to feminize the faces of trans- women in order to make their identities as women recognizable to others. In this essay, I explore how the identification of facial femininity was negotiated in two FFS surgeons’ practices. One committed to t...
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American feminist health activists in the 1970s created representations of genital anatomy intended to replace the abstracted images of biomedicine's 'modest witness', with what Michelle Murphy has called the 'immodest witness', authority explicitly derived from personal and embodied experience. Decades later, a feminist publication in the traditio...
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This article explores the research project that led to the development of facial feminization surgery, a set of bone and soft tissue reconstructive surgical procedures intended to feminize the faces of male-to-female trans- women. Conducted by a pioneering surgeon in the mid-1980s, this research consisted of three steps: (1) assessments of sexual d...
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Surgeons who perform sex reassignment surgeries (SRS) define their goals and evaluate their outcomes in terms of two kinds of results: aesthetic and functional. Since the neogenitals fashioned through sex reassignment surgeries do not enable reproductive function, surgeons must determine what the function of the genitals is or ought to be. A review...
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In this short essay I focus on two ethnographic scenes from the operating room in order to show the OR as a place both assiduously sterile and deeply intimate. In the process of these Facial Feminization Surgery procedures, surgeons and other OR staff reflect on the social changes that the surgery may (or may not) enable even while they are working...
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Full-text available
In Bodies in Formation: An Ethnography of Anatomy and Surgical Education, Rachel Prentice examines the intellectual, ethical, and technical means through which medical students become surgeons. Prentice’s analysis is based on nearly two years of ethnographic research conducted in two prominent North American medical schools beginning in 2001. With...

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