Eric T. Jones

Eric T. Jones
Oregon State University | OSU · Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Ph.D.

About

74
Publications
25,390
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617
Citations
Introduction
I teach and do applied field-based research projects on nontimber forest products, sustainable natural resource management, cultural mapping, rural culture, and diversity, equity, and inclusion.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
Oregon State University
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Teaching "Nontimber Forest Products: An Interdisciplinary Approach" and other graduate level courses.
April 2018 - present
Portland State University
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Collaborating on cultural mapping project with multiple departments.
September 2016 - June 2017
Oregon State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (74)
Article
Full-text available
Decision support tools have been shown to encourage the development of shared mental models about ecosystem dynamics when they are used in collaborative processes that bring together technical experts and other stakeholders on a regular basis over an extended period. However, when a diverse set of stakeholders is involved in environmental planning,...
Poster
Full-text available
The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) is a major overhaul of U.S. food safety law. The final rules currently being released will greatly impact domestic and foreign food production, processing and distribution. The rules will affect all levels of the food supply chain from small farmers and processors to large corporate producers. This poster is...
Research
Full-text available
The purpose of this website is to provide information and tools to help advance knowledge and sustainable development of nontimber forest products (NTFPs) on small forestlands in the United States. A goal is to strengthen cultural traditions and help landowners manage for biodiversity and complex ecological systems. Designed, authored and maintaine...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster introduces and connects two income opportunities for rural forestland owners: farm-stay agritourism and nontimber forest product harvesting.
Article
Full-text available
Non-industrial private forest owners in 16 states were surveyed about their interest in learning about managing their land for nontimber forest products. T-tests of means, Mann-Whitney U-tests, and crosstabulations identified land tenure, resource management, and socio-demographic characteristics associated with interest in nontimber forest product...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Pacific Northwest forests offer a wide array of wild foods. Many wild fruits,stems, leaves, roots, tubers, nuts, saps,mushrooms, and truffles have nutritional as well as commercial value. Many of these products are harvested from public forests (federal, state, local) or large,private industrial forestlands; however,small to medium-sized private fo...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This guide will provide landowners like yourself information on how to conduct a basic inventory of nontimber forest products on your land and digitally map your data. You can use free, widely available digital mapping tools that are increasingly a part of everyday life. A glossary of key terms is provided at the end of this guide. After learning s...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This factsheet provides an overview of public forest lands as a resource for commercially marketable nontimber forest products, focusing primarily on federal lands.
Technical Report
Full-text available
This short extension factsheet provides a general introduction to harvesting and marketing commercially valuable wild edible mushrooms. The Pacific Northwest is home to one of the greatest diversities of culinary wild mushrooms in the world. Most of the 40‐plus species that occur in the vast regional forests do so in great abundance and typically g...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Oregon grape (Mahonia spp.) is a native understory shrub found in Pacific Northwest forests. The plant has several uses, including medicine (roots), landscaping (whole plant), dyes, and food (from berries). The inner bark of its roots, stems and leaves contain several alkaloids (most notably berberine) with anti‐inflammatory and anti‐bacterial prop...
Technical Report
Full-text available
There is a high demand in the U.S. for natural medicines, particularly in the form of herbal supplements. Since the 1990s, the market for botanicals has become a multi‐billion dollar industry. Many of the medicinal plants that supply this giant industry grow wild on forest lands. This report provides a brief introduction to marketing medicinal plan...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Cascara sagrada meaning “sacred bark” is a large deciduous shrub/tree found in Pacific Northwest forests. Cascara bark (or “chittum”) has been used by Native Americans for hundreds of years as a natural laxative and has been marketed by the pharmaceutical industry since the late 1800s. Many claim it is the most widely used purgative in the world. C...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This document provides a brief overview on how small forestland owners might generate supplemental income by offering tourists a chance to stay overnight on their land. In Europe it is quite common to be able to stay overnight on working farms, forests, and ranches. This tradition is commonly referred to as a farm-stay. Farm-stays are rarer in the...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Overview The purpose of this primer is to introduce Oregon native truffles to small‐to‐medium sized forestland owners interested in income opportunities to supplement or replace timber management. In addition to a basic overview of the resource, this fact sheet contains links to additional information sources to help with inventorying, industry con...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Pacific Northwest forests are home to several species of wild huckleberry (Vaccinium spp.). Closely related to the cultivated blueberry, the fruit of the huckleberry is harvested and sold fresh, frozen, dried, or canned. The berries are also found in processed consumer products such as jam, tea, wine, syrup, honey, candy, pies, muffins, pancakes, f...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Each year, thousands of people descend upon private forests to harvest Christmas trees at U‐pick tree farms. Incentives for customers include getting a better price for a tree, spending time in the outdoors, and bonding with family and friends. In addition to Christmas trees, forests offer hundreds of products that can be harvested by visitors. Thi...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This thirty-five page market analysis provides guidance in assessing the potential market value of native Oregon edible culinary truffles produced in small-to-medium sized private temperate forests. The contents are oriented toward the small woodland owner entrepreneur seeking to develop a business plan for their forest system that includes managem...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Nontimber forest products (NTFPs), defined as any product obtained from forests for personal or commercial use other than industrial timber, can be an important source of income for forestland owners. One barrier to the development of NTFP businesses beyond the start‐up phase is expanding labor to increase production. Many new businesses start with...
Poster
Full-text available
This printable poster provides the names and pictures of twenty-seven commercially viable nontimber forest products and their seasonal distribution in the Pacific Northwest (USA).
Poster
Full-text available
This poster may be printed in a variety of sizes for commercial and noncommercial purposes. It contains information about native culinary truffles found in Oregon, their habitat, sustainability issues and commercial considerations.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Many small forestland owners are venturing into the world of biodiversity set‐asides, conservation easements, and other environmental stewardship incentive programs to earn extra income and tax breaks by managing their forests and farms for ecosystem services such as biodiversity, clean water, and fish‐friendly cool streams. What is less commonly k...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The collection, trade, and artistry around figured wood are ancient and vast. Figured wood has been associated with goods representing value and quality throughout history—from beads in Native American indigenous trade networks to Chinese statues to furniture in French royal courts. The great and diverse forests of the Pacific Northwest are replete...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Overview Native seed is commercially harvested from hundreds of species of native plants in the Northwest. Many species, such as Roemer's Fescue and tree seed cones, are raised in agricultural or nursery settings and harvested by machine. Others are gathered by hand and sometimes by machine from the wild. The vast majority of native seed is used in...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Forest landowners who actively manage their land have likely purchased conifer and other seedlings grown in nurseries for planting (for example, for afforestation, reforestation, erosion control, habitat improvement, riparian management, or watershed enhancement).However, naturally occurring plants found on forest lands can also serve as a source o...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Pacific Northwest supplies over 25 million pounds of evergreen boughs worldwide during each Christmas season. Much of this supply comes from high elevation public forests and large industrial private forestlands; however, small privately‐owned forests also contribute to this supply. This report provides a brief introduction to evergreen boughs...
Chapter
Uncertainty, in its many manifestations, is a central factor in the management of complex systems, whether environmental (van der Sluijs 2007), climatic (Risbey and Kandlikar 2007), medical, or financial (McDaniel and Driebe 2005). Nowhere is this more apparent than in the management of ecosystems heavily affected by human use. True to the characte...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This forty-nine page market analysis provides guidance in assessing the potential market value of the medicinal plant, Oregon Grape Root. The contents are oriented toward the small, temperate woodland entrepreneur seeking to develop a business plan. This report describes all steps in the value chain, from production to marketing. Although this repo...
Chapter
Determining the economic value of these harvests is usually difficult and economic valuation methods are in their infancy. Traditional commodity tracking systems, such as national trade databases, list few if any wild fungi species and on-theground tracking systems are typically insufficient where they exist at all. One notable example is the trade...
Poster
Full-text available
Multi-stakeholder public participation is widely held to be crucial to the success of environmental problem solving (Dietz 2008). The use of computer-based decision support systems (DSS) is increasingly prevalent in these planning processes (NRC 2007) because of the complexity of the problems. Using salmonid recovery planning in the Columbia Basin...
Poster
Full-text available
Since time immemorial, Native Americans have resided in Western Oregon. Today, many of these tribes, including the Kalapuya, Molalla, Umpqua, Rogue River, Clackamas, Tillamook, some Shasta, and many other people from regional tribes are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The West Eugene Wetlands are within the traditional homelands of...
Poster
Full-text available
Since time immemorial, Native Americans have resided in Western Oregon. Today, many of these tribes, including the Kalapuya, Molalla, Umpqua, Rogue River, Clackamas, Tillamook, some Shasta, and many other people from regional tribes are part of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. The West Eugene Wetlands are within the traditional homelands of...
Poster
Full-text available
This printable poster juxtaposes long-term anthropogenic activity of Kalapuya Indians of the Willamette Valley against the more recent arrival of Euro-American settlers.
Article
Full-text available
Until recently restoration planning at the West Eugene Wetlands had not considered the anthropogenic influences over 12,000 years on the regional ecology prior to EuroAmerican settlers that began arriving 170 years ago to the area. However, the Kalapuya, the indigenous inhabitants of the area, were not simply passive residents. They were active man...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding anthropogenic history of the West Eugene Wetlands is is essential knowledge for today’s managers and scientists planning for restoration of the wetland ecosystem. The native plant and animal species of the wetlands are likely adapted to a landscape shaped by the human begins that lived in the area for many thousands of years, after th...
Article
Full-text available
This paper synthesizes the existing literature about traditional and local ecological knowledge relating to biodiversity in Pacific Northwest forests in order to assess what is needed to apply this knowledge to forest biodiversity conservation efforts. We address four topics: (1) views and values people have relating to biodiversity, (2) the resour...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we explore how modeling tools used in the multi-stakeholder process for salmon recovery in the Columbia River basin implicitly frame strategic planning so as to exclude other perspectives such as backcasting and the Precautionary Principle. Introduction. In the Columbia River basin, a complex multi-stakeholder process is underway to...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report synthesizes the literature on the role of informal economic activity in the United States postindustrial economy. Informal economic activity is expanding in the United States and is likely to continue in the foreseeable future. The formal and informal economic sectors are inextricably intertwined, with individuals and households combini...
Chapter
In recent decades, the shift toward ecosystem management and the growth of community-based and multi-stakeholder approaches to forestry have contributed to the increased visibility of NTFP harvesting. Interest has been growing in how NTFPs might be promoted as a tool to diversify and strengthen rural economies through managing for biological divers...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Large, but not insurmountable, obstacles remain to nontimber forest product (NTFP) development in the Middle Fork forest region east of Eugene, Oregon. he NTFP resource base itself is not a problem as these products are plentiful in the watershed. Though living wage jobs associated with NTFPs are scarce in the Middle Fork, the hundreds of harvester...
Article
Full-text available
The potential for traditional and local ecological knowledge to contribute to biodiversity conservation has been widely recognized, but the actual application of this knowledge to biodiversity conservation is not easy. This paper synthesizes literature about traditional and local ecological knowledge and forest management in the Pacific Northwest t...
Article
Full-text available
Nontimber forest product harvesting in the Pacific Northwest is neither a new activity nor a disappearing relic of the pre-industrial era. Though the emphasis may have shifted from subsistence to commercial and recreational pursuits, harvesting and harvesters of wild species are still widespread throughout the region. Hundreds of businesses and tho...
Article
Full-text available
Participatory (collaborative, multiparty, citizen, volunteer) monitoring is a process that has been increasing in popularity and use in both developing and industrialized societies over the last several decades. It reflects the understanding that natural resource decisions are more effective and less controversial when stakeholders who have an inte...
Article
Full-text available
This study provides an overview of nontimber forest products (NTFP) programs on national forests in the United States. We conducted an email survey in 2003 to obtain data on NTFP management activities on national forests across the country. Program characteristics examined in the study included important NTFPs managed on national forests, presence...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This document explores the potential of collaborative approaches for nontimber forest product inventory and monitoring in the United States. It begins by reviewing results of a federal and state survey that documented inventory and monitoring efforts for nontimber forest products in the United States. The surveys show that the majority of NTFP-rela...
Article
This document explores the potential of collaborative approaches for nontimber forest product inventory and monitoring in the United States. It begins by reviewing results of a federal and state survey that documented inventory and monitoring efforts for nontimber forest products in the United States. The surveys show that the majority of NTFP-rela...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Nontimber forest products (NTFP) in the United States are harvested for commercial and noncommercial purposes and include thousands of wild or semi-wild species or parts of species used for medicines, foods, decorations, fragrances, containers, dyes, fuel, shelter, art, ceremonial purposes, and more. Despite the known and substantial economic value...
Chapter
Full-text available
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service scientists are considering the importance to forest management of researching relations between human communities and forests, and the methods for doing so. An emerging theme is that greater integration in the agency is needed for understanding and taking action with complex matters like community fore...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Wild plants, stems, leaves, cones, boughs, berries, and other forest products have been a big part of the floral and decorative industry in the Pacific Northwest since the 1930s. Currently over 20,000 tons of floral products are collected from regional forests each year. Most of these products are harvested from large, private industrial forestland...
Chapter
This chapter highlights the need to understand and incorporate sociocultural issues associated with nontimber forest products (NTFP) harvesting in forestry research, management and policy making in USA. The relevance of several political ecology approaches to the study of nontimber forest products is examined. The challenges of conceptualizing and...
Book
Full-text available
This book provides the first comprehensive examination of nontimber forest products (NTFPs) in the United States, illustrating their diverse importance, describing the people who harvest them, and outlining the steps that are being taken to ensure access to them. As the first extensive national overview of NTFP policy and management specific to the...
Article
Full-text available
Despite an encouraging trend in North America of growing interest across a range of disciplines in non-timber forest products (e.g., this volume), NTFP harvesters' knowledge and practices continue to be poorly understood and undervalued, if not ignored, both by research scientists and forestland policy-makers and managers. This article explores why...
Article
The Pacific Northwest is a region where commercial demand for a variety of NTFP-floral greens, mushrooms, berries, mosses-has expanded rapidly over the past fifteen years, creating space for new types of harvesters. These are mainly recent Southeast Asian and Latino immigrants who find this work allows them some degree of self-direction and income....
Article
During the past decade, a variety of new state and federal laws and regulations have been developed to regulate the use and management of NTFPs on federal and state lands. A growing body of literature on the social aspects of NTFPs indicates that few NTFP harvesters and buyers are involved in the development of these rules. This policy overview dra...
Chapter
The Pacific Northwest is a region where commercial demand for a variety of NTFPs-floral greens, mushrooms, berries, mosses-has expanded rapidly over the past fifteen years, creating space for new types of harvesters. These are mainly recent Southeast Asian and Latino immigrants who find this work allows them some degree of self-direction and income...
Chapter
Full-text available
Despite an encouraging trend in North America of growing interest across a range of disciplines in non-timber forest products (e.g., this volume), NTFP harvesters' knowledge and practices continue to be poorly understood and undervalued, if not ignored, both by research scientists and forestland policy-makers and managers. This article explores why...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This proceedings report from the Intertribal Timber Conference in Lewiston, ID on the Nez Perce Reservation discusses issues associated with broadening tribal tree farm management to promote biodiversity, traditional foods and medicines, shelter materials and economic development.
Article
Full-text available
The MAB Mushroom Study was designed to promote sustainable natural and human communities and to involve multiple stakeholders having widely varying styles and knowledge of forest management. It used an interdisciplinary and collaborative research approach that united biologists, social scientists, land managers, and nonprofit volunteers from academ...
Article
Full-text available
Commercial, recreational, and subsistence harvesting of chanterelle mushrooms (Cantharellus formosus (cibarius) and C. subalbidus) on the Olympic Peninsula Biosphere Reserve was investigated during three fall harvest seasons (1994-1996). This article describes i) sociocultural characteristics of harvesters (ethnicity, class, power, gender, age, and...
Article
Some three dozen biologists, resource managers, social scientists, and volunteers worked together between 1993 and 1996 to study the biological, socioeconomic, and managerial concerns of harvesting chanterelle (Cantharellus sp.) mushrooms on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State in the Pacific Northwest. Highly variable productivity across diff...
Article
Full-text available
在1994~1996年的3个秋季收获季节,对奥林匹克半岛生物圈保护区的鸡油菌 (Cantharellus formosus [cibarius] 和C.subal-bidus)的商业性、消闲性和维持生计性采集进行了调查。本文描述了①采集者的社会-文化特征 (民族、阶层、权力、性别、年龄和亲属关系);②采集者的组织(生产单位、策略、实践、采集方法、劳动力分配和对于资源的权利);③商业性采集的经济价 值。采用的主要方法是对79个商业性采集者的面对面调查和访谈及对53个消闲性采集者的面对面调查和通信调查。民族和社会阶层是商业性和消闲性采集者之间 冲突关系的最突出的社会性因素他们在其他方面如价值观、行为规范和集体观念万面,却有着惊人的一致。在商业性采集者中,拉丁美洲人取代了东南亚人和美籍欧 洲人。他...
Article
Full-text available
大约30多名生物学家、资源管理 者、社会学家和志愿者从1993年到1996年一起合作,研究美国华盛顿州奥林匹克半岛采集鸡油菌(Cantharellus sp.)的生物学、社会经济学与管理的问题。不同地形上生产力的高度变化与较低的蘑菇价格使采集者密切注意更多的法规、更高的许可证费以及限制某些人采集 的合同(这些人出最高的投标价格来获得一些地区的采集权)。公共与私人资源管理者面临着预算的降低、许可证的必要花费和包括收获管理实际花费在内的其它费 用;公共土地管理者也必须遵守现有的法规,向那些为商业和消闲目的使用森林者收费。对机械和资产的蓄意破坏、潜在的责任要求和非法倾倒垃圾迫使公有林和工 业林管理者严格控制他们的资产;这种做法限制了一般公众与寻找传统和新收获地点的蘑菇采集者接近林地。虽然采集者与研...
Article
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人 与生物圈蘑菇研究的目的是促进自然界与人类社区的可持续发展,它包含了具有各种不同态度和不同林业管理知识的相关人员。它利用跨学科和合作研究的方法将来 自科研、国家和州政府以及商业部门的生物学家、社会学家、土地管理者和非营利志愿者联合起来。由于合作和跨学科的项目性质,研究开发者通过竞争获得另一笔 拨款来总结他们的工作作为俄勒冈州立大学可持续林业合作组的4个科研教学案例之一。这第二项拨款产生了3项成果。第一项成果描述可持续性的理论基础和定 义、可持续框架下的人与生物圈蘑菇研究如何运作、研究中有利害关系的人如何被选择和如何工作,以及可持续性研究的5个主要要素。第二项是教学注释包,它解 释学生、资源管理者、科学家和其它人如何利用案例研究开展他们自己的跨学科可持续性研究。第三,是带解说词的一套64张幻...
Article
Full-text available
"As approaches espousing the importance of local participation in natural resource decision making have gained political ascendancy in recent years, local communities are being seen as the most appropriate managers of local natural resources. However, this overlooks the important role played by external, mobile groups who also have a stake in manag...
Article
Full-text available
This paper starts with a deceptively simple question: where are the pickers? This question calls for more than just fieldwork; it is useful to turn the gaze on ourselves for a moment. Why is it that we almost never see SFP harvesters themselves at SFP workshops, seminars, etc.? Why do the policy and research communities know so little about the peo...

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Projects (2)
Project
The purpose of the website is to provide information and tools to help advance sustainable commercial development of nontimber forest products (NTFPs) on forestlands in the United States, especially small forestry, agroforestry, and ecoagricultural systems. https://www.ntfpinfo.net/
Project
This producer and landowner education project focuses on active and potential production of bigleaf maple ( Acer macrophyllum ) sap for food products in western Oregon. Bigleaf is native to the Pacific Northwest and substantial volumes occur throughout western Oregon. The goal of this project is to catalyze development of a bigleaf maple sap industry that provides small agricultural and forest landowners, land trusts, and public agencies with an additional, ecologically sustainable, and economically significant revenue stream.