Eric B. Duell

Eric B. Duell
University of Kansas | KU · Kansas Biological Survey

Doctor of Philosophy

About

9
Publications
1,029
Reads
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29
Citations
Introduction
I am a plant ecologist with broad interests in plant-microbial interactions and the influence of these interactions on individual plant health and performance, as well as plant community structure and function. My work has focused on the effects of drought on the performance of native and non-native prairie plants and their associated mycorrhizal communities. My Ph.D. research combined these interests to examine the largely unexplored world of milkweed-mycorrhizal symbioses.
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - May 2015
Oklahoma State University - Stillwater
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Grasslands are globally imperiled, facing continued threats from anthropogenic disturbances. Seeding remains a common grassland restoration method, and yet, is typically met with limited success, partially because soils of degraded systems inhibit the germination of native species. We assessed the germination success of 16 native grassland species...
Article
Losses of grasslands have been largely attributed to widespread land use changes, such as conversion to row‐crop agriculture. The remaining tallgrass prairie faces further losses due to biological invasions by non‐native plant species, often with resultant ecosystem degradation. Of critical concern for conservation, restoration of native grasslands...
Article
Full-text available
Elevated temperatures and drought may exacerbate invasion success of non-native grasses, as non-native species often possess traits favored by a warmer, drier world. In our study, we assessed plant traits potentially linked to invasion success under elevated temperature and drought, including biomass production, reproductive allocation, arbuscular...
Article
The plant microbiome is critical to plant health and is degraded with anthropogenic disturbance. However, the value of re‐establishing the native microbiome is rarely considered in ecological restoration. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are particularly important microbiome components, as they associate with most plants, and later successional gr...
Article
Full-text available
Agriculture touches all aspects of society and global environmental health. Dwindling phosphorous reserves are a looming crisis for civilization, and soil erosion typically far outpaces pedogenesis. Improving plant–mycorrhizal symbioses can enhance sustainable agriculture because mycorrhizas typically improve host‐plant nutrition and stabilize soil...
Article
Full-text available
Non-native invasive plants pose major threats to biodiversity across the globe. In the southeastern United States, kudzu (Pueraria montana [Lour.] Merr.) was introduced as a flowering, ornamental vine. In many areas, it quickly escaped cultivation and has caused major disruption to native ecosystems. Over the past two decades, kudzu has gradually s...
Article
Full-text available
The plant-soil feedback framework allows researchers to target the interaction of plants and root-associated microbes and to determine its interplay on plant-plant interactions. Plant-soil feedbacks in terrestrial ecology are well-documented, but the strength and direction of feedbacks as influenced by abiotic environmental factors, such as tempera...
Article
More intense and frequent droughts, coupled with elevated temperatures, are projected for grasslands worldwide. Although it has been suggested that alterations in temperature and precipitation will increase the success of biological invasions, studies that combine these climate change scenarios are limited. These changes in climate may increase the...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Biological invasion by non-native plants is a major cause of native ecosystem loss. It has been widely suggested that climate change will increase the success of biological invaders, yet studies that combine these global changes are limited. Climate change may directly increase success of non-natives as these species o...

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