Eric Burkart

Eric Burkart
Universität Trier · Department of History

Dr. phil.

About

15
Publications
2,218
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
71
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
July 2013 - June 2015
Technische Universität Dresden
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
The paper focuses on a late 14th century manuscript containing a collection of various texts (Nuremberg, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Hs 3227a), among them the oldest version of Johannes Liechtenauer’s fencing didactics. It argues that the anonymous scribe wrote down the mnemonic verses and commented on them while he received a practical martial ar...
Book
Full-text available
The reign of the Valois Dukes of Burgundy (1363–1477) might, in retrospect, suggest a link between modern and medieval features of their rule, especially with respect to the crusade projects of Philipp the Good (1419–1467). These ambitions may seem like a late blossoming of medieval culture, in line with the arguments of Johan Huizinga, that does n...
Chapter
Full-text available
What bodily experiences did fighters make through their lifetime and especially in violent conflicts? How were the bodies of fighters trained, nourished, and prepared for combat? How did they respond to wounds, torture and the ubiquitous risk of death? The articles present examples of body techniques of fighters and their perception throughout the...
Article
The paper is organised around the notion of embodied technique. The recent attempts to formulate scientific methodologies for the reconstruction of medieval fighting techniques based on a study of premodern fight books raise questions about the epistemological status of these (re)constructed techniques developed by modern practitioners of Historica...
Article
Full-text available
The paper is organised around the notion of embodied technique. The recent attempts to formulate scientific methodologies for the reconstruction of medieval fighting techniques based on a study of premodern fight books raise questions about the epistemological status of these (re)constructed techniques developed by modern practitioners of Historica...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this paper is to discuss the communication strategies of medieval fightbooks and the purpose of integrated depictions of their authors and addressees. The point of departure is a series of three articles written by Jan-Dirk Müller between 1992 and 1994, in which he analyses the relationship between mnemonic verses, glosses and didact...
Article
Full-text available
Traditionally, the discipline of International Relations (IR) assumed a state-centric perspective. However, as new actors emerged and begun to play an increasingly important role in international politics, the discipline opened itself towards non-state actors. Among these, multinational enterprises (MNEs), their participation in public–private part...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
The goal was to analyse the role crusading played as part of the Burgundian political discourses connected to status and self-image of the elites around duke Philipp the Good (1419-1467) and Jean Germain, his first chancellor of the order of the golden fleece (1431-1461).
Project
Fighting is a key part of human interaction and is omnipresent in medieval texts and images. On the one hand, fighting occurred as a concrete action during violent encounters in wars, feuds, and duels. The ephemeral practice is itself, however, only indirectly documented through material traces such as osteoarchaeological remains or surviving artefacts like arms and armour. On the other hand, fighting is one of the most symbolically charged human actions; descriptions of fighting are central to many religious, historiographic, and literary texts, while depictions of fighting constitute an important motif in the field of visual arts. Normed, agonistic, and competitive fighting, distinct from violent modes of combat in the narrower sense, played an equally important role in the field of medieval embodied practices and cultures of leisure and exercise. Fight books emerged as part of this context in the Late Middle Ages as a new literary genre that linked descriptions and depictions of fighting to the concrete practice. From the early fourteenth century onwards, masters of arms began to describe their embodied knowledge and their didactics on wrestling and the use of various weapons in often richly illuminated manuscripts. These treatises that establish fighting as an object of knowledge are the first systematic documentations of medieval body techniques. They made their way into print at the very beginning of the sixteenth century and became a landmark in medieval and early modern movement notation. In a way, these treatises are the direct precursors to our modern day advisory literature on various sports and movement systems. They have so far, however, never been treated comprehensively from the perspective of cultural history. This project thus approaches the fight book corpus of manuscripts and printed works from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century in combination with complementary sources from the perspectives of (1) discourse and media analysis, (2) praxeography, and (3) cultural theory. Of key importance is the analysis of these treatises as part of an educational context in which fighting as a subjectively experienced practice became the object of an expert discourse dominated by fencing masters. This development was part of a professionalisation process during the Late Middle Ages that also involved the establishment of guild-like structures such as fencing fraternities within the Holy Roman Empire. The popularity of public fencing schools and competitions also underlines the importance of these phenomena. The scientific objective of the project is to thus analyse the complex relationship between palpable fighting practices and their translation into discourses, media, and didactics from a perspective of cultural history and with a focus on the urban space as a productive centre of fighting knowledge.