Eoin J O'Gorman

Eoin J O'Gorman
Imperial College London | Imperial · Department of Life Sciences

PhD, BScZy

About

66
Publications
49,369
Reads
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2,834
Citations
Citations since 2016
34 Research Items
1894 Citations
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Introduction
Postdoctoral research fellow, currently working on the impacts of geothermal warming on the structure and functioning of freshwater stream ecosystems
Additional affiliations
October 2014 - September 2019
Imperial College London
Position
  • NERC Independent Research Fellow
January 2010 - September 2012
University College Dublin
Description
  • IRCSET-funded postdoctoral fellowship
September 2005 - September 2009
University College Cork
Description
  • PhD in Marine Ecology
Education
October 2000 - June 2004
University College Cork
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (66)
Article
Deep-learning tools can help to construct historical, modern-day, and future food webs.
Article
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Organisms have the capacity to alter their physiological response to warming through acclimation or adaptation, but the consequence of this metabolic plasticity for energy flow through food webs is currently unknown, and a generalisable framework does not exist for modelling its ecosystem-level effects. Here, using temperature-controlled experiment...
Article
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The Scotia Sea is a productive pelagic ecosystem in the Southern Ocean, which is rapidly changing as a consequence of global warming. Species range shifts are particularly evident, as sub-Antarctic species expand their range from North to South, potentially rearranging the structure of this ecosystem. Thus, studies are needed to determine the curre...
Article
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The impacts of climate change on ecosystem structure and functioning are likely to be strongest at high latitudes due to the adaptation of biota to relatively low temperatures and nutrient levels. Soil warming is widely predicted to alter microbial, invertebrate, and plant communities, with cascading effects on ecosystem functioning, but this has l...
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Environmental temperature and body size are two prominent drivers of predation. Despite the ample evidence of their independent effects, the combined impact of temperature and predator-prey body size ratio on the strength and stability of trophic interactions is not fully understood. We experimentally tested how water temperature alters the functio...
Article
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Populations of Atlantic salmon are crashing across most of its natural range: understanding the underlying causes and predicting these collapses in time to intervene effectively are urgent ecological and socioeconomic priorities. Current management techniques rely on phenomenological analyses of demographic population time-series and thus lack a me...
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Cross-ecosystem subsidies are important as their recipients often rely on them to supplement in situ resource availability. Global warming has the potential to alter the quality and quantity of these subsidies, but our knowledge of these effects is currently limited. Here, we quantified the biomass and diversity of the invertebrates exchanged betwe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Organisms have the capacity to alter their physiological response to warming through acclimation or adaptation, but empirical evidence for this metabolic plasticity across species within food webs is lacking, and a generalisable framework does not exist for modelling its ecosystem-level consequences. Here we show that the ability of organisms to ra...
Article
Species and community-level responses to warming are well documented, with plants and invertebrates known to alter their range, phenology or composition as temperature increases. The effects of warming on biotic interactions are less clearly understood, but can have consequences that cascade through ecological networks. Here, we used a natural soil...
Preprint
Full-text available
Adaptative foraging behaviour should promote species coexistence and biodiversity under climate change as consumers are expected to maximise their energy intake, according to principles of optimal foraging theory. We test these assumptions using a unique dataset comprising (1) 22,185 stomach contents of fish species across functional groups and fee...
Article
Global warming over the next century is likely to alter the energy demands of consumers and thus the strengths of their interactions with their resources. The subsequent cascading effects on population biomasses could have profound effects on food web stability. One key mechanism by which organisms can cope with a changing environment is phenotypic...
Article
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Many life-history events in aquatic invertebrates are triggered by seasonal changes in water temperature, but other ecological factors may be important as well. To rule out the confounding effects of changing water temperature, we studied the seasonal dynamics of an aquatic invertebrate community and their effect on a top fish predator in a thermal...
Article
To better understand the consequences of global warming for species and their distribution, we need studies quantifying how environmental change affects communities and interaction networks. Where studies to date have mainly focused on climatic effects on species distribution (the Grinnellian dimension of the niche), recent research has emphasised...
Article
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1. Climate warming is predicted to have major impacts on the structure of terrestrial communities, particularly in high latitude ecosystems where growing seasons are short. Higher temperatures may dampen seasonal dynamics in community composition as a consequence of earlier snowmelt, with potentially cascading effects across all levels of biologica...
Article
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Urbanisation poses a clear threat to tropical freshwater streams, yet fundamental knowledge gaps hinder our ability to effectively conserve stream biodiversity and preserve ecosystem functioning. Here, we studied the impact of urbanisation on structural and functional ecosystem responses in low-order streams in Singapore, a tropical city with a mos...
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Changes in global and regional precipitation regimes are among the most pervasive components of climate change. Intensification of rainfall cycles, ranging from frequent downpours to severe droughts, could cause widespread, but largely unknown, alterations to trophic structure and ecosystem function. We conducted multi-site coordinated experiments...
Article
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Microplastics are an emerging pollutant of high concern, with their prevalence in the environment linked to adverse impacts on aquatic organisms. However, our knowledge of these impacts on freshwater species is rudimentary, and there is almost no research directly testing how these effects can change under ongoing and future climate warming. Given...
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Warming increases the metabolic demand of consumers¹, strengthening their feeding interactions². This could alter energy fluxes3–5 and even amplify extinction rates within the food web6–8. Such effects could simplify the structure and dynamics of ecological networks9,10, although an empirical test in natural systems has been lacking. Here, we teste...
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1.Global warming is one of the greatest threats to the persistence of populations: increased metabolic demands should strengthen pairwise species interactions, which could destabilise food webs at the higher organisational levels. Quantifying the temperature dependence of consumer‐resource interactions is thus essential for predicting ecological re...
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Predator–prey interactions in natural ecosystems generate complex food webs that have a simple universal body-size architecture where predators are systematically larger than their prey. Food-web theory shows that the highest predator–prey body-mass ratios found in natural food webs may be especially important because they create weak interactions...
Article
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Environmental warming places physiological constraints on organisms, which may be mitigated by their feeding behaviour. Theory predicts that consumers should increase their feeding selectivity for more energetically valuable resources in warmer environments to offset the disproportionate increase in metabolic demand relative to ingestion rate. This...
Article
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Global warming is predicted to significantly alter species physiology, biotic interactions, and thus ecosystem functioning, as a consequence of coexisting species exhibiting a wide range of thermal sensitivities. There is, however, a dearth of research examining warming impacts on natural communities. 2.Here, we used a natural warming experiment in...
Article
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Warming can lead to increased growth of plants or algae at the base of the food web, which may increase the overall complexity of habitat available for other organisms. Temperature and habitat complexity have both been shown to alter the structure and functioning of communities, but they may also have interactive effects, for example, if the shade...
Article
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Natural ecosystems typically consist of many small and few large organisms. The scaling of this negative relationship between body mass and abundance has important implications for resource partitioning and energy usage. Global warming over the next century is predicted to favour smaller organisms, producing steeper mass–abundance scaling and a les...
Article
Understanding the consequences of species loss in complex ecological communities is one of the great challenges in current biodiversity research. For a long time, this topic has been addressed by traditional biodiversity experiments. Most of these approaches treat species as trait-free, taxonomic units characterizing communities only by species num...
Data
Figure S1. Map of the Hengill geothermal valley. Figure S2. Length‐weight relationship for brown trout. Figure S3. Scale radius to fish length relationships. Figure S4. Dietary niche width of trout and invertebrates. Figure S5. Selectivity in the feeding of trout on common prey groups. Table S1. Sample sizes for estimating dietary niche width...
Article
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Species extinctions are accelerating globally, yet the mechanisms that maintain local biodiversity remain poorly understood. The extinction of species that feed on or are fed on by many others (i.e. ‘hubs’) has traditionally been thought to cause the greatest threat of further biodiversity loss. Very little attention has been paid to the strength o...
Article
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Global warming is widely predicted to reduce the biomass production of top predators, or even result in species loss. Several exceptions to this expectation have been identified, however, and it is vital that we understand the underlying mechanisms if we are to improve our ability to predict future trends. Here, we used a natural warming experiment...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming is widely predicted to reduce the biomass production of top predators, or even result in species loss. Several exceptions to this expectation have been identified, however, and it is vital that we understand the underlying mechanisms if we are to improve our ability to predict future trends. Here, we used a natural warming experiment...
Article
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1. Monitoring anthropogenic impacts is essential for managing and conserving ecosystems, yet current biomonitoring approaches lack the tools required to deal with the effects of stressors on species and their interactions in complex natural systems. 2. Ecological networks (trophic or mutualistic) can offer new insights into ecosystem degradation, a...
Article
(a) Direct feeding interactions between a higher predator (the three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus), intermediate consumers (native Mysis salemaai and invasive Hemimysis anomala mysids), and a basal prey (the cladoceran, Daphnia magna). Photo credits: G. aculeatus and H. anomala by Stephen Potts, M. salemaai and D. magna obtained from...
Article
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Understanding and predicting how global warming affects the structure and functioning of natural ecosystems is a key challenge of the 21st century. Isolated laboratory and field experiments testing global change hypotheses have been criticised for being too small-scale and overly simplistic, whereas surveys are inferential and often confound temper...
Article
Metabolic theory predicts that warming will increase the energetic demands of organisms, with especially strong effects on larger individuals. Mean individual body size should therefore decline, which also implies a loss of biomass at higher trophic levels. If resources are plentiful and easily assimilated, however, the required to persist in warme...
Article
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Biological invasions have the potential to cause severe alterations to the biodiversity of natural ecosystems. At the same time, variation in the diversity and composition of native communities may have an important influence on the impact of invasions. Here, effects of the invasive Japanese wireweed, Sargassum muticum, were tested across a range o...
Data
Table S10. Size measurements (valve width and length) of diatom individuals sampled from the fourteen streams.
Data
Full-text available
Plots showing a comparison of water chemistry in the Hengill streams to other sites. Figure S2. Photographs illustrating shape approximations of a diatom species with an unusual valve outline. Figure S3. Linear regression plots of temperature against log10 valve area for 31 diatom species that were present in at least 2 of the sampled streams. Figu...
Data
Table S11. Count data for all diatom species found in each of the fourteen streams.
Article
Full-text available
Climate warming has been linked to an apparent general decrease in body sizes of ectotherms, both across and within taxa, especially in aquatic systems. Smaller body size in warmer geographic regions has also been widely observed. Since body size is a fundamental determinant of many biological attributes, climate-warming-related changes in size cou...
Article
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1. There has been a lack of software available to ecologists for the management, visualisation and analysis of ecological community and food web data. Researchers have been forced to implement their own data formats and software, often from scratch, resulting in duplicated effort and bespoke solutions that are difficult to apply to future analyses...
Chapter
Environmental warming is predicted to rise dramatically over the next century, yet few studies have investigated its effects in natural, multi-species systems. We present data collated over an 8-year period from a catchment of geothermally heated streams in Iceland, which acts as a natural experiment on the effects of warming across different organ...
Article
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The distribution of species body size is critically important for determining resource use within a group or clade. It is widely known that non-avian dinosaurs were the largest creatures to roam the Earth. There is, however, little understanding of how maximum species body size was distributed among the dinosaurs. Do they share a similar distributi...
Article
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Biodiversity is organised into complex ecological networks of interacting species in local ecosystems, but our knowledge about the effects of habitat fragmentation on such systems remains limited. We consider the effects of this key driver of both local and global change on both mutualistic and antagonistic systems at different levels of biological...
Article
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Climate change has complex structural impacts on coastal ecosystems. Global warming is linked to a widespread decline in body size, whereas increased flood frequency can amplify nutrient enrichment through enhanced run-off. Altered population body-size structure represents a disruption in top-down control, whereas eutrophication embodies a change i...
Article
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Coastal environments are among the most productive on the planet, providing a wide range of ecosystem services. Development and exploitation mean that they are faced with stresses from a number of anthropogenic sources. Such stresses are typically studied in isolation, but multiple stressors can combine in unexpected ways to alter the structure of...
Article
1. There has been a lack of software available to ecologists for the management, visualisation and analysis of ecological community and food-web data. Researchers have been forced to implement their own data formats and software, often from scratch, resulting in duplicated effort and bespoke solutions that are difficult to apply to future analyses...
Article
Full-text available
Little is understood about connectivity of deep-sea fish populations. Analysis of the geochemical properties of fish otoliths is one way to draw inferences regarding their movements and habitat use in the marine environment. Trace element and stable isotope analyses of otoliths were undertaken to assess patterns of spatial and temporal population s...
Article
Body mass has been shown to scale negatively with abundance in a wide range of habitats and ecosystems. It is believed that this relationship has important consequences for the distribution and maintenance of energy in natural communities. Some studies have shown that the relationship between body mass and abundance may be robust to major food web...
Article
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Attempts to gauge the biological impacts of climate change have typically focussed on the lower levels of organization (individuals to populations), rather than considering more complex multi-species systems, such as entire ecological networks (food webs, mutualistic and host-parasitoid networks). We evaluate the possibility that a few principal dr...
Article
We are experiencing a global extinction crisis as a result of climate change and human-induced alteration of natural habitats, with large predators at high trophic levels in food webs being particularly vulnerable. Unfortunately, there is a scarcity of food web data that can be used to assess how species extinctions alter the structure and stabilit...
Article
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Functionally unique species contribute to the functional diversity of natural systems, often enhancing ecosystem functioning. An abundance of weakly interacting species increases stability in natural systems, suggesting that loss of weakly linked species may reduce stability. Any link between the functional uniqueness of a species and the strength...
Article
1. We established complex marine communities, consisting of over 100 species, in large subtidal experimental mesocosms. We measured the strength of direct interactions and the net strength of direct and indirect interactions between the species in those communities, using a combination of theoretical and empirical approaches. 2. Theoretical predict...