Eoin L Brodie

Eoin L Brodie
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | LBL · Ecology Department

PhD

About

410
Publications
67,477
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32,004
Citations
Citations since 2017
97 Research Items
18929 Citations
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Publications

Publications (410)
Article
Soil nitrogen (N) cycling is critical to the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the impact of global change factors (GCFs) on the microbial mediators of N cycling pathways has yet to be synthesized, and it also remains unclear whether the response of the abundance of N‐cycling genes can predict changes in their corresponding processes...
Preprint
Efficient biochemical transformation of belowground carbon by microorganisms plays a critical role in determining the long-term fate of soil carbon. As plants assimilate carbon from the atmosphere, up to 50% is exuded into the area surrounding growing roots, where it may be transformed into microbial biomass and subsequently stabilized through mine...
Article
Full-text available
Remote sensing approaches have revolutionized the study of macroorganisms, allowing theories of population and community ecology to be tested across increasingly larger scales without much compromise in resolution of biological complexity. In microbial ecology, our remote window into the ecology of microorganisms is through the lens of genome seque...
Preprint
Soil microorganisms have adapted to compete and exploit different metabolic niches in their physically and chemically diverse environment via evolution and acquisition of distinct physiological and biochemical traits. As the interface for most carbon and nutrient exchange between plants and microorganisms, the rhizosphere has received substantial a...
Article
The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) has drastically increased in the United States since 1970s for unclear reasons. We hypothesized that the widespread usage of antibiotics has increased the procarcinogenic potential of the orodigestive microbiota along the sequence of gastroesophageal reflux (GR), Barrett's esophagus (BE), and EA pheno...
Article
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The perennial native switchgrass adapts better than other plant species do to marginal soils with low plant-available nutrients, including those with low phosphorus (P) content. Switchgrass roots and their associated microorganisms can alter the pools of available P throughout the whole soil profile making predictions of P availability in situ chal...
Article
Soil microorganisms shape global element cycles in life and death. Living soil microorganisms are a major engine of terrestrial biogeochemistry, driving the turnover of soil organic matter — Earth’s largest terrestrial carbon pool and the primary source of plant nutrients. Their metabolic functions are influenced by ecological interactions with oth...
Article
Peatlands are climate critical carbon (C) reservoirs that could become a C source under continued warming. A strong relationship between plant tissue chemistry and the soil organic matter (SOM) that fuels C gas emissions is inferred, but rarely examined at the molecular level. Here we compared Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy measure...
Article
Full-text available
Current knowledge of the mechanisms driving soil organic matter (SOM) turnover and responses to warming is mainly limited to surface soils, although over 50% of global soil carbon is contained in subsoils. Deep soils have different physicochemical properties, nutrient inputs, and microbiomes, which may harbor distinct functional traits and lead to...
Article
Full-text available
Permafrost thaw is a major potential feedback source to climate change as it can drive increased release of greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). This carbon release from decomposition of thawing soil organic material can be mitigated by increased net primary production (NPP) caused by warming, increasing atmospheric CO2, and pla...
Article
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In studying problems like plant‐soil‐microbe interactions in environmental biogeochemistry and ecology, one usually has to quantify and model how substrates control the growth of, and interaction among, biological organisms (and abiotic factors, e.g., adsorptive mineral soil surfaces). To address these substrate‐consumer relationships, many substra...
Article
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Maize-forage grasses intercropping systems have been increasingly adopted by farmers because of their capacity to recycle nutrients, provide mulch, and add C to soil. However, grasses have been shown to increase nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Some tropical grasses cause biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) which could mitigate N2O emissions in...
Article
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Increased drought and temperatures associated with climate change have implications for ecosystem stress with risk for enhanced carbon release in sensitive biomes. Litter decomposition is a key component of biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, but questions remain regarding the local response of decomposition processes to climate chang...
Preprint
Full-text available
Current knowledge of the mechanisms and responses of soil organic matter (SOM) turnover to warming is mainly limited to surface soils, although over 50% of global soil carbon is contained in subsoils. Deep soils have different physicochemical properties, nutrient inputs and microbiomes, which may harbor distinct functional traits and lead to differ...
Article
Full-text available
Switchgrass is a deep-rooted perennial native to the US prairies and an attractive feedstock for bioenergy production; when cultivated on marginal soils it can provide a potential mechanism to sequester and accumulate soil carbon (C). However, the impacts of switchgrass establishment on soil biotic/abiotic properties are poorly understood. Addition...
Article
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Microorganisms have evolved several mechanisms to mobilize and mineralize occluded and insoluble phosphorus (P), thereby promoting plant growth in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the linkages between microbial P-solubilization traits and the preponderance of insoluble P in natural ecosystems are not well known. We tested the P solubilization trait...
Article
Full-text available
Snowmelt dynamics are a significant determinant of microbial metabolism in soil and regulate global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients by creating seasonal variations in soil redox and nutrient pools. With an increasing concern that climate change accelerates both snowmelt timing and rate, obtaining an accurate characterization of microb...
Article
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The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Colorado East River Community Observatory (ER) in the Upper Colorado River Basin was established in 2015 as a representative mountainous, snow‐dominated watershed to study hydrobiogeochemical responses to hydrological perturbations in headwater systems. The ER is characterized by steep elevation, geologic, hydr...
Article
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Background Despite their widespread distribution and ecological importance, protists remain one of the least understood components of the soil and rhizosphere microbiome. Knowledge of the roles that protists play in stimulating organic matter decomposition and shaping microbiome dynamics continues to grow, but there remains a need to understand the...
Article
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Physical samples are foundational entities for research across biological, Earth, and environmental sciences. Data generated from sample-based analyses are not only the basis of individual studies, but can also be integrated with other data to answer new and broader-scale questions. Ecosystem studies increasingly rely on multidisciplinary team-scie...
Preprint
Full-text available
Snowmelt dynamics are a significant determinant of microbial metabolism in soil and regulate global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients by creating seasonal variations in soil redox and nutrient pools. With an increasing concern that climate change accelerates both snowmelt timing and rate, obtaining an accurate characterization of microb...
Article
Full-text available
Carbohydrate rich substrates such as lignocellulosic hydrolysates remain one of the primary sources of potentially renewable fuel and bulk chemicals. The pentose sugar d-xylose is often present in significant amounts along with hexoses. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can acquire the ability to metabolize d-xylose through expression of heterologous d-xylo...
Article
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Recent studies in snowmelt-dominated catchments have documented changes in nitrogen (N) retention over time, such as declines in watershed exports of N, though there is a limited understanding of the controlling processes driving these trends. Working in the mountainous headwater East River Colorado watershed, we explored the effects of riparian ho...
Preprint
Full-text available
Roots are the primary source of organic carbon inputs to most soils. Decomposition is a multi-trophic process involving multiple kingdoms of microbial life, but typically microbial ecology studies focus on one or two major lineages in isolation. We used Illumina shotgun RNA sequencing to conduct PCR-independent SSU rRNA community analysis ("communi...
Article
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Young women in sub-Saharan Africa are disproportionally affected by HIV infection and unintended pregnancies. However, hormonal contraceptive (HC) use may influence HIV risk through changes in genital tract microbiota and inflammatory cytokines. To investigate this, 130 HIV negative adolescent females aged 15–19 years were enrolled into a substudy...
Article
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Modern microbial and ecosystem sciences require diverse interdisciplinary teams that are often challenged in “speaking” to one another due to different languages and data product types. Here we introduce the IsoGenie Database (IsoGenieDB; https://isogenie-db.asc.ohio-state.edu/ ), a de novo developed data management and exploration platform, as a s...
Article
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Point 1: In recent years the availability of airborne imaging spectroscopy (hyperspectral) data has expanded dramatically. The high spatial and spectral resolution of these data uniquely enable spatially explicit ecological studies including species mapping, assessment of drought mortality, and foliar trait distributions. However, we have barely be...
Article
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Soil microbial biomass can reach its annual maximum pool size beneath the winter snowpack and is known to decline abruptly following snowmelt in seasonally snow-covered ecosystems. Observed differences in winter versus summer microbial taxonomic composition also suggests that phylogenetically conserved traits may permit winter- versus summer-adapte...
Article
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Soil bacterial communities are altered by anthropogenic drivers such as climate change-related warming and fertilization. However, we lack a predictive understanding of how bacterial communities respond to such global changes. Here, we tested whether phylogenetic information might be more predictive of the response of bacterial taxa to some forms o...
Article
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Drought represents a significant stress to microorganisms and is known to reduce microbial activity and organic matter decomposition in Mediterranean ecosystems. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the drought stress response of microbial decomposers. Here we present metatranscriptomic and metabolomic data on the physiological response of...
Article
Full-text available
Microbial activity increases after rewetting dry soil, resulting in a pulse of carbon mineralization and nutrient availability. The biogeochemical responses to wet-up are reasonably well understood and known to be microbially mediated. Yet, the population level dynamics, and the resulting changes in microbial community patterns, are not well unders...
Article
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The rhizosphere is a hotspot for microbial carbon transformations, and is the entry point for root polysaccharides and polymeric carbohydrates that are important precursors to soil organic matter (SOM). However, the ecological mechanisms that underpin rhizosphere carbohydrate depolymerization are poorly understood. Using Avena fatua, a common annua...
Preprint
Full-text available
Soil microbial biomass can reach its annual maximum pool size beneath the winter snowpack and is known to decline abruptly following snowmelt in seasonally snow-covered ecosystems. Observed differences in winter versus summer microbial taxonomic composition also suggests that phylogenetically conserved traits may permit winter- versus summer-adapte...
Article
Full-text available
Due to the promiscuous exchange of genetic material and asexual reproduction, delineating microbial species (and, by extension, populations) remains challenging. Because of this, the vast majority of microbial studies assessing population structure often compare divergent strains from disparate environments under varied selective pressures. Here, w...
Article
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Projected 21st century changes in high‐latitude climate are expected to have significant impacts on permafrost thaw, which could cause substantial increases in emissions to the atmosphere of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4, which has a global warming potential 28 times larger than CO2 over a 100‐year horizon). However, predicted CH4 emission...
Article
Eukaryotic microalgae and prokaryotic cyanobacteria (often collectively described as algae) have been proposed as a promising commercially viable feedstock for biofuels and other bioproducts. Open pond algal monocultures are subjected to environmental fluctuations (i.e. temperature), limiting productivity as environmental conditions vary. An approa...
Article
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Determining the carbon sources for active microbial populations in the subsurface is a challenging but highly informative component of subsurface microbial ecology. This work developed a method to provide ecological insights into groundwater microbial communities by characterizing community RNA through its radiocarbon and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) signa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background Young women in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and often rely on hormonal contraception (HC) to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Some observational data suggest that HC might affect STI risk. We examined the impact of three HC methods on the adolescent STI incidence and BV prevalence in a rando...
Preprint
Full-text available
In microorganisms, specifically free-living bacteria and archaea, the equivalent of the biological species concept does not exist, creating several barriers to the study of the fine-scale genetic structure of microbial populations and thus, the processes contributing to microbial diversification. More often than not, studies attempting to delineate...
Preprint
Full-text available
Drought represents a significant stress to soil microorganisms and is known to reduce microbial activity and organic matter decomposition in Mediterranean ecosystems. However, we still lack a detailed understanding of the drought stress adaptations of microbial decomposers. We hypothesised that drought causes greater microbial allocation to stress...
Article
Full-text available
Beneficial microbial associations enhance the fitness of most living organisms, and wood-feeding insects offer some of the most striking examples of this. Odontotaenius disjunctus is a wood-feeding beetle that possesses a digestive tract with four main compartments, each of which contains well-differentiated microbial populations, suggesting that a...
Preprint
Full-text available
The rhizosphere is a hotspot for microbial C transformations, and the origin of root polysaccharides and polymeric carbohydrates that are important precursors to soil organic matter. However, the ecological mechanisms that underpin rhizosphere carbohydrate depolymerization are poorly understood. Using Avena fatua, a common annual grass, we analyzed...
Preprint
Full-text available
Microorganisms are critical in terrestrial carbon cycling because their growth, activity and interactions with the environment largely control the fate of recent plant carbon inputs, as well as the stability of assimilated carbon. Soil carbon stocks reflect a balance between microbial decomposition and stabilization of organic carbon. The balance c...
Article
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Extreme weather, fires, and land use and climate change are significantly reshaping interactions within watersheds throughout the world. Although hydrological–biogeochemical interactions within watersheds can impact many services valued by society, uncertainty associated with predicting hydrology-driven biogeochemical watershed dynamics remains hig...
Article
Background: Exclusive breastfeeding reduces the rate of postnatal HIV transmission compared to non-exclusive breastfeeding, however the mechanisms of this protection are unknown. Our study was designed to interrogate the mechanisms underlying the protective effect of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF). Methods: A prospective, longitudinal study of in...
Article
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Like all higher organisms, plants have evolved in the context of a microbial world, shaping both their evolution and their contemporary ecology. Interactions between plant roots and soil microorganisms are critical for plant fitness in natural environments. Given this co-evolution and the pivotal importance of plant-microbial interactions, it has b...
Article
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Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) account for a substantial portion of primary production in dryland ecosystems. They successionally mature to deliver a suite of ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration, water retention and nutrient cycling, and climate regulation. Biocrust assemblages are extremely well adapted to survive desiccation and...
Article
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Cyanobacterial mats are laminated microbial ecosystems which occur in highly diverse environments and which may provide a possible model for early life on Earth. Their ability to produce hydrogen also makes them of interest from a biotechnological and bioenergy perspective. Samples of an intertidal microbial mat from the Elkhorn Slough estuary in M...
Article
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Much genetic diversity within a bacterial community is likely obscured by microdiversity within operational taxonomic units (OTUs) defined by 16S rRNA gene sequences. However, it is unclear how variation within this microdiversity influences ecologically relevant traits. Here, we employ a multifaceted approach to investigate microdiversity within t...
Article
Soil microaggregates are the fundamental building block, at the micron scale, of the highly hierarchical structure of soils, and can exert a significant control on the local biological metabolism and microbial community partitioning. In this study we propose an analysis protocol for the morphometric characterization of complete soil microaggregates...
Article
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The capillary fringe is a subsurface terrestrial-aquatic interface which can be a significant hotspot for biogeochemical cycling of terrestrially derived organic matter and nutrients. However, pathways of nitrogen (N) cycling within this environment are poorly understood, and observations of temporally discrete changes in nitrate concentrations lac...
Article
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Species compositions of gut microbiomes impact host health [ 1–3 ], but the processes determining these compositions are largely unknown. An unexplained observation is that gut species composition varies widely between individuals but is largely stable over time within individuals [ 4, 5 ]. Stochastic factors during establishment may drive these al...
Article
Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), is a widespread and toxic groundwater contaminant. Reductive immobilization to Cr(III) is a treatment option, but its success depends on the long-term potential for reduced chromium precipitates to remain immobilized under oxidizing conditions. In this unique long-term study, aquifer sediments subjected to reductive Cr(...
Article
Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling, based on published and newly generated data, is used to better understand the interplay of hydrology, geochemistry, and biology controlling the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, sulfur, and uranium in a shallow floodplain. In this syste...