Enrico Fiori

Surgery, Gastroenterology, Oncology

MD
34.37

Publications

  • A. Lamazza · E. Fiori

    No preview · Article · Jun 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Self-expandable metal stents can be used to treat patients with rectovaginal fistula after colorectal resection for cancer. Fifteen patients with rectovaginal fistula, after colorectal resection for cancer, were treated with endoscopic placement of a self-expandable metal stent. In four patients, a diverting proximal stoma had been performed elsewhere. Mean age was 58 years. All patients had preoperative radiotherapy. In ten patients, the stent was placed as initial form of treatment. Four patients were referred after multiple failed operations. The control group consisted of ten patients who had rectovaginal fistula and underwent proximal diverting ileostomy and percutaneous drainage of the surrounding abscess RESULTS: One patient was not able to tolerate the stent, which was removed. At a mean follow-up of 22 months, the rectovaginal fistula healed in 12 patients. In the remaining two patients, the fistula has reduced significantly in size to allow a successful flap transposition. The fistula healed only in five out of the ten patients who had only a proximal ileostomy. Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metal stents represents a valid adjunctive to treat patients with rectovaginal fistula, after colorectal resection for cancer.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Surgical Endoscopy
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During the last 15 years, 150 patients were treated with endoscopic stenting for obstructing colorectal cancer. During the same period, ten patients had endoscopic stenting for colorectal obstruction from extracolonic malignancy (three patients gastric cancer, three patients pancreatic cancer, four patients ovarian cancer). Here, we report our experience in the treatment of six patients with colorectal obstruction from invading ovarian cancer (three patients) and colorectal cancer (three patients), in whom the tumour was considered initially not resectable, because of extensive local spread (T4). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Colorectal Disease
  • Source

    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Endoscopy
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Metabolic syndrome has been identified as a risk factor for colorectal cancer and adenoma. The aim of our study was to assess the risk of colorectal cancer and adenoma in an adult Italian population with metabolic syndrome. Ninety patients with metabolic syndrome were prospectively compared against a matched population without the syndrome to assess the prevalence of colorectal adenoma. Another 1,500 patients undergoing screening colonoscopy were prospectively analyzed: 134 patients with metabolic syndrome and colorectal adenoma were compared against a group of 108 patients with colorectal adenoma without metabolic syndrome to assess the prevalence of cancer. The study was performed from January 2008 until December 2010. Data were analyzed from March to June 2011. The prevalence of colorectal adenoma was twice as high in patients with metabolic syndrome. The incidence of cancer was higher in patients with colorectal adenoma and metabolic syndrome. Associated obesity and liver steatosis were the only factors with independent statistical value. Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for adenoma and cancer degeneration when obesity is present. Associated liver steatosis is a significant risk factor for colorectal cancer. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Anticancer research
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bezoars are aggregates of indigested foreign material that accumulate in the gastroenteric tract, expecially in the stomach and in the narrowest points of the small bowel. They often occur in subjects who follow a diet rich in fruit and vegetables and in those one who previously underwent gastric resective surgery for peptic ulcer. Bezoar formation has even been observed in case of reduced gastric motility and secretion due to diabetes, hypothyroidism, pernicious anemia, myotonic syndromes, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. As they are an uncommon cause of small bowel obstruction, phytobezoars are often not considered in the differential diagnosis of occlusive intestinal syndromes and so frequently come as an intraoperative finding. A consequence of this missed diagnosis in the preoperative period is an unnecessary diagnostic delay that can significantly increase morbidity and mortality. This case report illustrates the need to include phytobezoars in the preoperative diagnostic workout of intestinal obstruction in order to rule out the presence of multiple bezoars and prevent recurrent obstruction. Now that phytobezoars are becoming a less infrequent cause of small bowel obstruction than previously thought, such a diagnostic possibility should always be considered. Bezoars, Bowel occlusion.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Anastomotic leak after colorectal resection for cancer is a challenging clinical problem. The postoperative quality of life in these situations is significantly impaired. We prospectively analyzed the effect of placing a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) at the level of the leak, with or without proximal diverting ileostomy, in 22 patients with symptomatic anastomotic leakage after colorectal resection. The stents were placed successfully in all 22 patients. An proximal ileostomy was created in 15 patients under general anesthesia. The anastomotic leak healed, without evidence of residual stricture or major incontinence, in 19 patients (86 %). In 3 patients, the leak did not heal; in 2 patients with recurrent rectovaginal fistula, the size of the leak decreased significantly, allowing successful flap transposition; and only 1 patient required a permanent stoma. SEMS placement is a valid adjunct to the treatment of patients with symptomatic anastomotic leakage after colorectal resection. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Endoscopy
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AimSelf expandable metal stents can be used to treat patients with rectovaginal fistula after anterior resection for cancer.Method Ten patients of mean age of 56.3 years with rectovaginal fistula after colorectal resection for cancer were treated with endoscopic placement of a self expandable metal stent. In three patients a diverting proximal stoma had been performed elsewhere. The rectal opening of the fistula was located from 3 to 10 cm from the anal verge (mean 6 cm). All patients had preoperative radiotherapy. In seven patients the stent was placed as the initial treatment while three referred patients had had multiple failed operations.ResultsThere were no complications after the procedure. At a mean follow up of 24 months, the rectovaginal fistula has healed without major faecal incontinence in eight patients. In the remaining two the fistula has reduced significantly in size to allow a successful flap transposition.Conclusion Endoscopic placement of a self expandable metal stent is a valid adjunct to treat patients with rectovaginal fistula after colorectal resection for cancer.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Colorectal Disease
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Self expandable metallic stents can be used to treat patients with symptomatic anastomotic complications after colorectal resection. Material and Methods Twenty patients with symptomatic anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection were treated with endoscopic placement of a self expandable metal stent. Ten patients had “simple” anastomotic stricture. In the remaining 10 patients a leak was associated to the stricture. Results The anastomotic leakage healed without evidence of residual stricture or major fecal incontinence in 8 out of 10 patients. Overall the anastomotic stricture was resolved in 14 out of the 20 patients. Conclusions Self expandable metal stents represent a valid adjunctive to treat patients with symptomatic anastomotic complications after colorectal resection for cancer. They have a complementary role to balloon dilatation in case of simple anastomotic stricture, and they improve the rate of healing when the stricture is associated with a leak.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · American journal of surgery
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose. Bowel preparation for surveillance endoscopy following surgery can be impaired by suboptimal bowel function. Our study compares two groups of patients in order to evaluate the influence of colorectal resection on bowel preparation. Methods. From April 2010 to December 2011, 351 patients were enrolled in our retrospective study and divided into two homogeneous arms: resection group (RG) and control group. Surgical methods were classified as left hemicolectomy, right hemicolectomy, anterior rectal resection, and double colonic resection. Bowel cleansing was evaluated by nine skilled endoscopists using the Aronchick scale. Results. Among the 161 patients of the RG, surgery was as follows: 60 left hemicolectomies (37%), 62 right hemicolectomies (38%), and 33 anterior rectal resections (20%). Unsatisfactory bowel preparation was significantly higher in resected population (44% versus 12%; P value = 0.000). No significant difference (38% versus 31%, P value = ns) was detected in the intermediate score, which represents a fair quality of bowel preparation. Conclusions. Our study highlights how patients with previous colonic resection are at high risk for a worse bowel preparation. Currently, the intestinal cleansing carried out by 4 L PEG based preparation does not seem to be sufficient to achieve the quality parameters required for the post-resection endoscopic monitoring.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014
  • Source

    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the early and long-term postoperative results of malabsorptive surgery in morbidly obese patients. Between 2000 and 2007, 102 morbidly obese patients were referred to the Department of Surgery "Pietro Valdoni", "Sapienza" University of Rome, Policlinico "Umberto I°", Rome, Italy for malabsorptive surgery. All patients underwent derivative biliodigestive surgery after they had been reviewed by a team of surgeons, physicians, dieticians, and psychologists. There were no intra-operative complications, but two patients suffered postoperative pulmonary embolisms, which resolved with medical treatment. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 7 days, with no early or late mortality. Maximum weight loss was reached 12-24 months after surgery, while the mean percentage excess weight loss at 3-5 years ranged from 45 to 64 %. Specific postoperative complications in the first 2 years after surgery were abdominal abscess (n = 2), gastroduodenal reflux (n = 4), and incisional hernia (n = 6). Diabetes resolved in 98 % of the diabetic patients within a few weeks after surgery and blood pressure normalised in 86.4 % of those who had had hypertension preoperatively. Obstructive sleep apnoea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome also improved significantly in 92 % of the patients. Morbidly obese patients can undergo biliodigestive surgery safely with good long-term weight loss and quality of life expectancy.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Surgery Today
  • Source

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Endoscopy
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Tumors arising from glands of the female ano-genital area, such as minor and major vestibular glands, are very rare. Lesions affecting Bartholin's gland can be divided into two groups: benign and malignant lesions. In the first group we can include nodular hyperplasia, adenoma, adenomioma which can sometimes cause Bartholin's gland enlargement and difficult differential diagnosis. Surgery is considered the treatment of choice, frequently represented by marsupialization with rates of local recurrence. We describe a case of a 50-year-old woman with a several-years history of recurrent episodes of Bartholinitis, previously treated with marsupialization. Patient underwent complete excision of the left Bartholin's gland without operative complications. Pathological findings showed a Bartholin's gland hyperplasia. Post-operative course was regular, free from surgical complications. After one year, the patient is free from any local disease. In women in postmenopausal age, in those cases in which marsupialization doesn't lead to an improvement in symptomatology and in those cases in which, at physical examination, Bartholin's gland enlargement appeared to be firm and irregular, because of the higher incidence of malignancy in these situations, total excision of the gland is recommended. Total excision of the Bartholin's Gland is a safe technique, given the low incidence of procedure- related morbilities. We do not consider biopsy of the gland a proper strategy for the high percentage of false negative results. Bartholin's Gland, Differential diagnosis Hyperplasia, Local excision, Surgical treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the use of self expandable metallic stents to treat patients with symptomatic benign anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection METHOD: Ten patients with a benign symptomatic anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection were treated with endoscopic placement of a self expandable metal stent. The stent was placed successfully in all 10 patients without any major morbidity. At a mean follow up of 18 months the stenosis was resolved successfully in 7 out 10 patients (70%). The remaining 3 patients were subsequently treated successfully with balloon dilatation. Self expandable metal stents represent a valid alternative to balloon dilation to treat patients with benign symptomatic anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection for cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Colorectal Disease
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The authors report the final results of a prospective single-center randomized study whose aim was to compare the endoscopic placement of self-expandable stents with open surgical gastroenterostomy to relieve gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) in patients with advanced antropyloric adenocarcinoma. A systematic review of the medical literature from December 1999 to December 2011 was carried out to determine the results of endoscopic stenting in patients with GOO from unresectable primary cancer of the antropyloric region.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · American journal of surgery
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) can be used to treat patients with symptomatic anastomotic complications after colorectal resection. In the present case series, 16 patients with symptomatic anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection were treated with endoscopic placement of SEMS. Seven patients had a "simple" anastomotic stricture and nine patients had a fistula associated with the stricture. The anastomotic fistula healed without evidence of residual stricture or major fecal incontinence in seven of the nine patients. Overall the anastomotic stricture was resolved in 10 of the 16 patients. SEMS placement represents a valid adjunctive to treatment in patients with symptomatic anastomotic complications after colorectal resection for cancer.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · Endoscopy
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare the site, age and gender of cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and polyps in a single referral center in Rome, Italy, during two periods. CRC data were collected from surgery/pathology registers, and polyp data from colonoscopy reports. Patients who met the criteria for familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease were excluded from the study. Overlap of patients between the two groups (cancers and polyps) was carefully avoided. The χ(2) statistical test and a regression analysis were performed. Data from a total of 768 patients (352 and 416 patients, respectively, in periods A and B) who underwent surgery for cancer were collected. During the same time periods, a total of 1693 polyps were analyzed from 978 patients with complete colonoscopies (428 polyps from 273 patients during period A and 1265 polyps from 705 patients during period B). A proximal shift in cancer occurred during the latter years for both sexes, but particularly in males. Proximal cancer increased > 3-fold in period B compared to period A in males [odds ratio (OR) 3.31, 95%CI: 2.00-5.47; P < 0.0001). A similar proximal shift was observed for polyps, particularly in males (OR 1.87, 95%CI: 1.23-2.87; P < 0.0038), but also in females (OR 1.62, 95%CI: 0.96-2.73; P < 0.07). The prevalence of proximal proliferative colonic lesions seems to have increased over the last decade, particularly in males.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012 · World Journal of Gastroenterology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) placement is a valid form of therapy for patients with obstructing colon rectal cancer. The procedure is not feasible for a minority of patients with a very low risk of bowel perforation. This report analyzes the results of a technical detail used for SEMS placement. Methods: In 43 patients with colon rectal obstruction, the SEMS apparatus was introduced through a guidewire passed above the obstruction in the channel of a pediatric nasogastroscope (diameter, 4.9 mm). The pediatric nasogastroscope was passed into the obstruction and above, allowing the anatomy of the colorectal lesion and the passage of the guidewire to be visualized directly. Results: The SEMS was inserted successfully in all cases without complications. In a previous series of 82 patients who had passage of the guidewire through the obstruction blindly, four technical failures occurred (nonsignificant difference). Conclusions: A pediatric nasogastroscope can be useful for passing the colon rectal obstruction and guiding the passage of the guidewire under direct vision.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Surgical Endoscopy
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ganglioneuromas are rare benign peripheral neuroblastic tumors characterized by hyperplasia of ganglion cells, nerve fibers, and supporting cells. They are not usually localized in the colon. A 61-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our department for colon cancer screening. A colonoscopy revealed a lipoma of 5cm in diameter, two micropolyps of less than 1cm, and one sessile polyp of 0.6cm in diameter. The polyps were removed with hot biopsy forceps. A histological examination revealed two hyperplastic polyps and one ganglioneuroma polyp. A follow-up colonoscopy showed no signs of recurrence after 16 months. Although a few cases of lipomas associated with ganglioneuromatous syndrome have been reported, the association of an intestinal lipoma with an isolated ganglioneuroma polyp has not been described. The implications of this association are unknown.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · Journal of Medical Case Reports

51 Following View all

45 Followers View all