Enoch Brater

Enoch Brater
University of Michigan | U-M · Department of English Language and Literature

About

20
Publications
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74
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
27 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
In Beckett's work gray becomes a serial motif that brings a number of tonal values to his writing for the stage. Gray supports spatial, visual, and narrative ambiguity, and its effects highlight the conditional states that characterize subject, object, and image. As his work develops, shades of the color gray become more nuanced, but their status a...
Article
1. For Stoppard's work as a journalist, see Ira Nadel, Tom Stoppard: A Life (New York: Palgrave/Macmillan, 2002), 58-77. 2. Beckett quoted in Enoch Brater, The Essential Samuel Beckett (London: Thames and Hudson, 2003), 107. 3. On this point, see Andrew Sofer, The Stage Life of Props (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003). 4. See Nadel, 89...
Article
1. Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot (New York: Grove, 1954), 51. Subsequent citations from this play in my text are taken from this edition. 2. For Beckett's "meremost minimum," see Enoch Brater, Beyond Minimalism: Beckett's Late Style in the Theater (New York: Oxford, 1987). 3. See Enoch Brater, Why Beckett (London: Thames and Hudson, 1989), 7. 4...
Article
Sam Shepard's plays make unusual and unconventional use of stage time. In so doing, he follows in the tradition of innovative time signatures as they have been known to function in the work of American playwrights who preceded him, notably Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, and Tennessee Williams. In Fool for Love and A Lie of the Mind, however, time p...
Article
Beckett's later dramatic works defy generic classification as pure theatre, poetry, or prose. Instead, Brater argues, they forge a new aesthetic for themselves. Analysing Beckett's use of disjointed body imagery; mask; abstract monologue; and the experimentation in film and video in the 1980s, Brater demonstrates Beckett's truly avant-garde departu...
Article
Enoch Brater is widely published in the field of modern and contemporary drama. He is Associate Professor and Graduate Chairman in the Department of English at the University of Michigan, where he also serves as Director of the University's Summer Program in London. The essay printed here is from his forthcoming book Beyond Minimalism: Late Style i...
Article
Enoch Brater is Associate Professor and Graduate Chairman in the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He is widely published in the field of twentieth-century drama on such figures as Beckett, Pinter, Stoppard, Arthur Miller, Dürrenmatt, Noel Coward, Yeats, Peter Nichols, Ionesco and Brecht. He i...
Article
WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE INVISIBLE MR. GODOT HIMSELF — who never materializes on the Board where Gogo and Didi steadfastly await his appearance — none of Beckett's creations for the stage is so literally disembodied as the Mouth who speaks unendingly in Not 1. The play itself is an irreducible simplicity: we see Mouth, faintly lit from close—up an...
Article
Enoch Brater, who has been on the staff of the New Yonk Shakespeare Festival and the Loeb Drama Center at Harvard, is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. He has written previously for ELH, Modern Language Quarterly, Comparative Drama, Journal of Modern Literature, Educational Theatre Journal, Twentieth Century Literatu...
Article
No American playwright is more revered on the international stage than Arthur Miller. In Arthur Miller’s Global Theater—a fascinating collection of new essays by leading international critics and scholars—readers learn how and why audiences around the world have responded to the work of the late theatrical icon. With perspectives from diverse...

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