Emmy Bocaege

Emmy Bocaege
University of Kent | KENT · School of Anthropology and Conservation

PhD, bioarchaeology

About

33
Publications
8,863
Reads
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279
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
University of Kent
Position
  • PostDoc Position
December 2015 - November 2017
University of Bordeaux
Position
  • PostDoc Position
December 2014 - November 2015
Royal College of Surgeons of England
Position
  • Postdoctoral Research Assistant
Description
  • Collaborative project Royal College of Surgeons of England and Quekett Microscopical Club. Responsible for collection-based research using the College’s archives and digitisation of the Quekett microscopic collection

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Full-text available
Early life stress disrupts growth and creates horizontal grooves on the tooth surface in humans and other mammals, yet there is no consensus for their quantitative analysis. Linear defects are considered to be nonspecific stress indicators, but evidence suggests that intermittent, severe stressors create deeper defects than chronic, low-level stres...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: To study pre- and early postnatal tooth formation and to analyze the effects of physiological disturbances on enamel and dentin formation in deciduous teeth of infants from the Late Epipaleolithic (Natufian) site Shubayqa 1. Materials and methods: Ten deciduous teeth from six infants (ages at death between 21 and 239 days) were analyzed...
Poster
Full-text available
Linear hypoplastic defects of enamel are horizontal grooves on the tooth surface, representing disruptions to enamel secretion in response to disturbances during development. Compared to permanent teeth, much less is known about hypoplastic defects in deciduous teeth. Localized hypoplasia of the primary canine (LHPC) has been described in hominoids...
Article
Objective: To assess developmental disturbances through the analysis of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) frequency and to infer environmental stress and life history within Neolithic communities from Liguria (Italy). Materials: 43 unworn/minimally worn permanent anterior teeth of 13 individuals recovered from nearby caves and dated to c. 4800-4400...
Article
The appearance of rich and diverse funerary practices is one of the hallmarks of the Late Epipalaeolithic Natufian in the Levant. Numerous burials at a number of sites excavated mostly in the Mediterranean zone of the southern Levant have fed into the interpretation of the Natufian as a sedentary society of complex hunter-gatherers. Here, we report...
Article
European Mid Upper Paleolithic mortuary practices have been traditionally associated with primary burials, ochre, body ornaments and grave goods. Recently, evidence of the post-mortem treatment of skeletal remains, such as the displacement and removal of skeletal elements, has been reported for the Gravettian period in the Southwest of France. Here...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from a human diet based exclusively on wild plants and animals to one involving dependence on domesticated plants and animals beginning 10,000 to 11,000 y ago in Southwest Asia set into motion a series of profound health, lifestyle, social, and economic changes affecting human populations throughout most of the world. However, the so...
Poster
With the shift to a Neolithic way of life, humans experienced a major change in environmental stressors, probably caused by changes in diet and subsistence, population packing, and the spread of new pathogens. Developing individuals are the most susceptible to environmental stressors, and are therefore the most representative sample to describe to...
Article
Full-text available
This is the transcript of the panel discussion held at the close of the WAC 8 Digital Bioarchaeological Ethics Panel. Given the rapid pace of emerging technology that allows for the creation of digital bioarchaeological data, including representations of 3d shapes, the panel was convened to discuss common issues and dilemmas that arise from the int...
Poster
Les hypoplasies de l’émail dentaire ont été reconnues comme des défauts de l’émail dentaire qui font partie des standards épidémiologiques et elles sont systématiquement enregistrées dans des populations vivantes et passées. Elles se forment lors de l’interruption de la sécrétion de la matrice d’améloblastes. La forme plus fréquente d’HE est en sil...
Conference Paper
Recent excavations at Shubayqa 1, the first well-dated Natufian site outside the traditionally termed ‘core Mediterranean zone’, in the northern Badia region of eastern Jordan, have recovered the remains of a minimum number of 23 individuals. This sample includes six perinatal remains, revealing an untypical profile of a (Natufian) burial environme...
Presentation
Full-text available
Non-metric variations of perinates are a highly topical issue related to the increasing scientific interest in non-adult biological diversity. In particular, non metric dental traits in deciduous teeth are rarely reported despite their potential value in biological affinities discussions. Here we provide an overview of existing literature, unpubli...
Article
This study investigates morphological changes in pulp chambers of living and archaeological individuals with past vitamin D deficiency. Living individuals (n = 29), four with detailed medical and dental records and three groups of archaeological individuals (n = 25) were radiographed; selected individuals were further evaluated histologically for t...
Article
Full-text available
The Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA; c. 9600–8500 cal BC) period in the Levant provides the earliest confirmed evidence for plant cultivation anywhere in the world, marking a significant escalation in the human management of plants towards fully fledged agricultural food production. Until now, the majority of PPNA sites have been documented in the Jo...
Poster
Full-text available
In the early half of the twentieth century, Lady May Mellanby undertook a series of rigorous scientific investigations on dental development in Great Britain, including laboratory and clinical studies of the relationship between diet and teeth. In her pioneering work, using a large documented collection of histological sections of deciduous teeth o...
Article
Objectives: The investigation of the record of growth locked in dental enamel provides a unique opportunity to build a comprehensive picture of growth disruption episodes during childhood. This study presents a new methodological basis for the analysis of enamel growth disruptions (enamel hypoplasia) using incremental microstructures of enamel. M...
Article
Objectives: Whereas the differences in lateral enamel growth between fossil and modern populations have been well documented in recent years, few studies report on the variability in perikymata counts and distribution between modern human populations. There is a need for information on modern human populations from a wide range of geographical reg...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
http://worldarch.org/blog/wac-8-resolutions/2016
Article
As part of the recent Collections Review project carried out at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the scientific and historical potential of the collection of John Thomas Quekett (1815-1861), which includes archival documents, library items and an extensive collection of microscope slides, has been highlighted. In parallel with this review,...
Article
Full-text available
A world of tiny things: the museum’s microslide collection.
Thesis
The main aim of this project is to provide an insight into childhood experiences in the Neolithic Near East and to investigate the variation in skeletal and dental growth patterns within the context of the profound social and environmental changes taking place during this time period. Detailed archaeological information is available for the Neolith...
Article
Full-text available
Although historically, anatomy and pathology collections have played a significant part in medical education in the UK, many of these collections have suffered neglect towards the end of the last century. As specimens were used less often for teaching and research, collections declined – and with them their documentation and the requisite preservat...

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