Emmelie Astrom

Emmelie Astrom
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | SLU · Department of Aquatic Resources

PhD

About

17
Publications
5,568
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
254
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
254 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Introduction
I am a marine ecologist working with benthic habitats and associated fauna in areas under external forcing or disturbance. Currently, I am working with habitat mapping and identifying associated megafauna nearby areas with high fishing pressure. I have also focused on benthic habitats and natural methane seeps in the Arctic where I study community structures at Arctic cold seep communities, associated fauna and trophic interactions related to chemosynthesis.
Additional affiliations
June 2018 - present
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Studying the role of chemosynthetic carbon as food resource for benthos and assessing the impact of seabed methane emissions to benthic communities in the Arctic, Barents Sea. This is a post-doctoral scholar project funded by VISTA.
April 2014 - April 2018
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • This project aims to examine the macrofaunal response, community structure and function from sub-seabed gas deposits, cold seeps. The project is part of CAGE (Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate).
September 2007 - June 2013
University of Gothenburg
Position
  • Student

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Cold seeps are locations where hydrocarbons emanate from the seabed, fueling chemoautotrophic production that may support macrofaunal communities via chemosymbiosis or trophic inter-actions. The recent discovery of offshore sub-seabed gas reservoirs and venting methane at the seabed in Svalbard (75 to 79° N) provides the context to examine the infl...
Article
Full-text available
Cold seeps can support unique faunal communities via chemosynthetic interactions fueled by seabed emissions of hydrocarbons. Additionally, cold seeps can enhance habitat complexity at the deep-sea floor through the accretion of methane derived authigenic carbonates (MDAC). We examined infaunal and megafaunal community structure at high-Arctic cold...
Article
Full-text available
Cold seeps are locations where seafloor communities are influenced by the seepage of methane and other reduced compounds from the seabed. We examined macro-infaunal benthos through community analysis and trophic structure using stable isotope analysis at 3 seep locations in the Barents Sea. These seeps were characterized by high densities of the ch...
Article
Full-text available
Cold-seep benthic communities in the Arctic exist at the nexus of two extreme environments; one reflecting the harsh physical extremes of the Arctic environment and another reflecting the chemical extremes and strong environmental gradients associated with seafloor seepage of methane and toxic sulfide-enriched sediments. Recent ecological investiga...
Article
Full-text available
Benthic communities below the photic zone are largely reliant on the export of surface-water primary production and the flux of partially degraded organic matter to the seabed, i.e. pelagic−benthic coupling. Over the past decades, however, the role of chemosynthetically produced carbon in food webs has been recognized in various habitats. Cold seep...
Article
Full-text available
Biogeochemical cycling in the semi-enclosed Arctic Ocean is strongly influenced by land–ocean transport of carbon and other elements and is vulnerable to environmental and climate changes. Sediments of the Arctic Ocean are an important part of biogeochemical cycling in the Arctic and provide the opportunity to study present and historical input and...
Preprint
Full-text available
The paper describes the establishment, structure and current status of the first Circum-Arctic Sediment CArbon DatabasE (CASCADE), which is a scientific effort to harmonize and curate all published and unpublished data of carbon, nitrogen, carbon isotopes and terrigenous biomarkers in sediments of the Arctic Ocean in one database. CASCADE will enab...
Article
Full-text available
Joint Cruise 1-2 with R/V Kronprins Haakon addressed objectives of RF1, RF2 and RF3 on the Nansen Legacy main transect in open water and within the sea ice. The focus was on comparing the state of the physical, chemical and biological conditions in the southern and northern parts of the study area. Given this was the first research cruise on the ve...
Article
Full-text available
Cold seeps are locations where seafloor communities are influenced by the seepage of methane and other reduced compounds from the seabed. We examined macro-infaunal benthos through community analysis and trophic structure using stable isotope analysis at 3 seep locations in the Barents Sea. These seeps were characterized by high densities of the ch...
Article
We report, for the first time, the solemyid Acharax svalbardensis sp. nov., from deep-sea methane seep sites on the western Svalbard margin, 79°N. This species is rather small and so far the northernmost representative of its genus. It is identified based on the following combination of diagnostic characters: umbo 27–30% valve length from posterior...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cold seeps where methane and other reduced compounds emerge at the seabed can form the basis of chemosyn-thetic habitats and seafloor communities. We examined methane cold-seeps at three distinct locations in the Barents Sea in order to characterize the community and trophic structures. The seeps supported high densities (up to 3212 individuals 0.1...
Article
Full-text available
Cold-seep megafaunal communities around gas hydrate mounds (pingos) in the western Barents Sea (76°N, 16°E, ∼ 400 m depth) were investigated with high-resolution, geographically referenced images acquired with an ROV and towed camera. Four pingos associated with seabed methane release hosted diverse biological communities of mainly nonseep (backgro...
Article
Full-text available
Cold seep communities around gas hydrate mounds (pingos) in the Western Barents Sea (76°N, 16°E, ~400 m depth) were investigated with high resolution, geographically referenced images acquired with an ROV and towed camera. Four pingos associated with seabed methane release hosted diverse biological communities of mainly non-seep (background) specie...
Article
Bivalves have been found in unique benthic assemblages associated with active methane seeps and mounds along the western and southern margins of the Svalbard shelf (75–79°N) at 350–380 m depth. Among the samples collected were a number of shells of Thyasiridae that are distinct from any species previously described. Here we describe one new genus R...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cold seeps are locations where hydrocarbons, sulfide or reduced compounds emanate from the seafloor, which may fuel chemoautotrophic production and form additional hard bottom substrate through carbonate precipitation. Chemosynthetic symbiosis, trophic interactions, and additional bottom substrate types can provide a heterogeneous environment for d...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The analysis of molluscan shell material (sclerochronology) can provide information about an organism’s age, growth history, and environmental conditions during its lifetime. Bivalve molluscs are common members of hy- drothermal vents and methane cold seeps communities where, supported by chemosynthetic symbionts, they can reach high density and bi...
Article
We studied discrete bivalve shell horizons in two gravity cores from seafloor pockmarks on the Vestnesa Ridge (∼1200 m water depth) and western Svalbard (79°00' N, 06°55' W) to provide insight into the temporal and spatial dynamics of seabed methane seeps. The shell beds, dominated by two genera of the family Vesicomyidae: Phreagena s.l. and Isorro...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
www.nansenlegacy.org The Barents Sea is an Atlantic Water gateway to the Arctic Basin, at the same time as it is at the receiving end of sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean. Large-scale patterns of Arctic climate change are largely present, or even enhanced, in the Barents Sea. Increased heat transport with Atlantic Water has caused up to 50% reduction in sea ice cover in the 1998–2008 period and an increased “atlantification” of the northern parts of the Barents Sea, with weaker stratification of the water column and shallower distribution of the warmer Atlantic water. These changes in the physical environment transfer to the living environment, reflected in changed distribution and composition of species and communities. Much of our older knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the northern Barents Sea ecosystem and adjacent Arctic Basin is therefore no longer automatically applicable. Further, increased human presence and commercial activities in the formerly ice-covered areas of the Barents Sea require updated and new knowledge on this changing Arctic ecosystem. The Nansen Legacy constitutes an integrated Arctic perspective on climate and ecosystem change, from physical processes to living resources, and from understanding the past to predicting the future. The Nansen Legacy is the collective answer of the Norwegian research community to the outstanding changes witnessed in the Barents Sea and the Arctic as a whole. The Nansen Legacy constitutes a joint Norwegian research platform to address the following over-arching objectives: Improve the scientific basis for sustainable management of natural resources beyond the present ice edge Characterize the main human impacts, physical drivers, and intrinsic operation of the changing Barents Sea ecosystems – past, present, and future Explore and exploit the prognostic mechanisms governing weather, climate and ecosystem, including predictive capabilities and constraining uncertainties Optimize the use of emerging technologies, logistic capabilities, research recruitment and stakeholder interaction to explore and manage the emerging Arctic Ocean. The Nansen Legacy will provide a 2020–2100 outlook for the expected state of climate, sea ice, and ecosystem, including near-term predictions. It will evaluate the sensitivity and functionality of early-warning indicators used to detect change in marine resources and their vulnerability to exploitation. Further, the project will largely improve polar weather forecasts for the safety of people and commercial operations. Another core legacy will be the recruitment and training of the next generation of trained cross-disciplinary researchers, with a unique national and international network. Overall, the legacy and societal impact will be the scientific knowledge base needed for sustainable resource management in the transitional Barents Sea and adjacent Arctic Basin. The scientific investigation of a rapidly changing northern environment leads to research questions of such intellectual, empirical and logistical complexity that they can only be addressed properly through national and prioritized cooperation, with the highest scientific standards. The Nansen Legacy team is purposefully interdisciplinary including physical, chemical, and biological researchers from eight governmental Norwegian institutions, and two private research institutes. The institutions include universities, management oriented institutions, the national weather service, and research institutes with close collaboration with industrial partners. The joint effort offers a human capacity of 3590 person months, corresponding to 50 full time positions of dedicated scientists and support staff over a 6-year period. Moreover, the Nansen Legacy dispenses over 370 days of ship time, primarily on the newly launched Norwegian ice-going research vessel, Kronprins Haakon, which allows for collecting unique, synoptic and interdisciplinary seasonal and inter-annual time series data. The Nansen Legacy field component uses a combination of ship-based, moored, and autonomous technological platforms. To increase high-resolution observational capabilities leading to an increase in future forecast reliability, the Nansen Legacy will develop, test and apply novel advanced technologies in ice-covered regions. International cooperation is an absolute requirement for holistic research and management in the High North. The Nansen Legacy will contribute to international research and a comprehensive pan-Arctic understanding. Fridtjof Nansen overcame scientific and physical boundaries by challenging conventions, being unconstrained in his approach to science and to exploring nature in the field, and making full use of available human and logistical resources. In the spirit of Nansen, the Nansen Legacy will collaborate with relevant national and international research projects and initiatives to utilize complementary knowledge, share infrastructure, increase the scientific outcome and strengthen science networks.
Project
Investigate and study benthic communities at cold seeps offshore Western Svalbard and the Barents Sea.