Emmanuelle Casanova

Emmanuelle Casanova
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle · Homme et Environnement

Doctor of Philosophy

About

21
Publications
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Introduction
I work as a post-doctoral research fellow at the Natural History Museum of Paris. I do research in lipid residue analysis, ancient proteomics and radiocarbon dating on ceramic materials, faunal remains and human remains.

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
The analysis of processing standards alongside samples for quality assurance in radiocarbon ( ¹⁴ C) analyses is critical. Ideally, these standards should be similar both in nature and age to unknown samples. A new compound-specific approach was developed at the University of Bristol for dating pottery vessels using palmitic and stearic fatty acids...
Article
Full-text available
In European and many African, Middle Eastern and southern Asian populations, lactase persistence (LP) is the most strongly selected monogenic trait to have evolved over the past 10,000 years1. Although the selection of LP and the consumption of prehistoric milk must be linked, considerable uncertainty remains concerning their spatiotemporal configu...
Article
Full-text available
The Sun sporadically produces eruptive events leading to intense fluxes of solar energetic particles (SEPs) that dramatically disrupt the near-Earth radiation environment. Such events have been directly studied for the last decades but little is known about the occurrence and magnitude of rare, extreme SEP events. Presently, a few events that produ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stable isotope signatures of domesticates found on archaeology sites provide information about past human behaviour, such as the evolution and adaptation of husbandry strategies. A dynamic phase in cattle husbandry evolution is during the 6th millennium BCE, where the first cattle herders of central Europe spread rapidly through diverse forested ec...
Article
Over the last three decades, organic residue analysis has been shown to be especially useful in ancient diet reconstruction; however, it is only recently that the direct radiocarbon dating of lipid residues has become a reliable method for dating pottery vessels and food procurement activities. Here, we applied lipid residue analysis to 29 late Bro...
Article
Full-text available
With the occasion of the exhibition Fatti come nuovi (20 October 1985–12 January 1986), where the most prominent artworks of the Poldi Pezzoli Museum in Milan were shown after restoration, a multidisciplinary project was launched between the Museum and the Italian Montedison group. This project aimed at evaluating several conservation products used...
Article
The Alsace region bordering the Rhine River was extensively occupied during the Neolithic by farming societies with domesticated animal. The first settlers were two sub-groups of the Linearbandkeramik who appeared to diverge in several respects, including: pottery styles, house orientations and funerary rituals. To explore whether this was reflecte...
Article
Full-text available
The application of biomolecular techniques to archaeological materials from the Balkans is providing valuable new information on the prehistory of the region. This is especially relevant for the study of the neolithisation process in SE Europe, which gradually affected the rest of the continent. Here, to answer questions regarding diet and subsiste...
Article
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The recovery of Early Iron Age artefacts and domestic animal remains from hunter-gatherer contexts at Likoaeng, Lesotho, has been argued to indicate contact between highland hunter-gatherers and Early Iron Age agropastoralist communities settled in lowland areas of southeastern Africa during the second half of the first millennium AD. However, disa...
Article
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The development of pastoralism transformed human diets and societies in grasslands worldwide. The long-term success of cattle herding in Africa has been sustained by dynamic food systems, consumption of a broad range of primary and secondary livestock products, and the evolution of lactase persistence (LP), which allows digestion of lactose into ad...
Article
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https://rdcu.be/b3s6J Pottery is one of the most commonly recovered artefacts from archaeological sites. Despite more than a century of relative dating based on typology and seriation1, accurate dating of pottery using the radiocarbon dating method has proven extremely challenging owing to the limited survival of organic temper and unreliability o...
Article
At archaeological sites located on islands or near the coast, the potential exists for lipid extracts of potsherds to contain fatty acids (FA) from both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, meaning that consideration must be given to marine reservoir effects (MRE) in radiocarbon ( ¹⁴ C) analyses. Here we studied the site of Bornais (Outer Hebrides, U...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the results of the first dedicated study of organic residues in Portugal, extracted from pottery excavated from Anta 1 de Val da Laje passage grave. We fully exploit the organic residue extract, to obtain information regarding the diet of the people and their relationship with the environment, the socio-economic aspects of an...
Article
Full-text available
Organic residue analyses of archaeological ceramics can provide important insights into ancient foodways. To date, however, there has been little critical reflection on how lipid residues might (or might not) reflect dietary practices or subsistence strategies more generally. A combination of ethnoarchaeological research and chemical and isotopic a...
Article
Full-text available
Bog butters are large white or yellow waxy deposits regularly discovered within the peat bogs of Ireland and Scotland. They represent an extraordinary survival of prehistoric and later agricultural products, comprising the largest deposits of fat found anywhere in nature. Often found in wooden containers or wrapped in animal bladders, they are cons...
Article
Preparative capillary gas chromatography (pcGC) is widely used for the isolation of single compounds for radiocarbon determinations. While being effective at isolating compounds, there are still genuine concerns relating to contamination associated with the isolation procedure, such as incomplete removal of solvent used to recover isolated samples...
Article
Preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) is the central technique used for the purification of volatile or semi-volatile organic compounds for radiocarbon analysis using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). While thicker film columns offer efficient separations, column bleed of cyclic poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) stationary phase has been...
Article
Early restoration work on archaeological objects generally made use of glues, fillers, consolidants or varnishes composed of natural or synthetic organic compounds. They were chosen for their chemical and physical properties as well as their compatibility with the constitutive material of the object in question. This paper aims to develop a methodo...
Article
Full-text available
Investigations of organic residues associated with archaeological pottery using modern analytical chemical methods began in the 1970s. There was early recognition that the analysis of lipids (i.e. fats, waxes and resins) preserved in surface residues or the fabric of single pottery sherds, representative of single vessels, was a powerful method for...

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Project (1)
Project
VARGAH ("mobile camps" in Persan) explores the emergence of pastoralist groups in prehistoric societies in Iran, more precisely on the economy, the chronology and the vertical mobility populations in the Zagros mountains. For this project I use an analytical approach using chromatographic, spectrometric, stable isotope ratio techniques and radiocarbon dating to resolve the subsitence and chronology of ancient pastoralists.