Emma Waterton

Emma Waterton
Western Sydney University · Institute for Culture and Society (ICS)

Doctor of Philosophy

About

105
Publications
22,199
Reads
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2,249
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2010 - present
Western Sydney University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (105)
Chapter
In this introductory chapter, we outline three key points of distinction in our examination of geographies of commemoration in a digital world. First, we discuss our characterization of geographies of commemoration and its importance. Second, we outline our approach to tropes of Anzac, and explain how these tropes link to memories, places and exper...
Chapter
In this chapter, we explore the theme of presence/absence, attending to how different layers of commemoration are made possible through the digital. We use new empirical material to explore the strong family connections that many people experience as central to their own Anzac commemorations, and consider the role of multiculturalism in demarcating...
Chapter
In this chapter, we proffer a new epistemology of memory. We discuss why we think this new epistemology of memory is necessary, and we link this requisite to the complexity of geographies of commemoration. This complexity relates to the in-depth place-based acumen required to comprehend the complicated geopolitical terrain of the sites, places and...
Chapter
The final chapter of this book provides a reflection on the multiple, fluid and emergent encounters and engagements with geographies of commemoration of Anzac, emphasizing their malleability to new contexts and contingency on personal histories and experiences. To reinforce this position, we locate our own relationships with Anzac in a set of perso...
Chapter
In this chapter, we interrogate how commemoration is felt in a digital world. Adopting the phrase ‘digital feelings’, and focusing on sensory and affective experience, we explore how feelings help constitute meaning in Anzac rituals and activities, and, moreover, how they are composed and circulated in different ways via a range of digital media. W...
Chapter
In this chapter, we examine Anzac tropes and symbols and consider their relations to Anzac events through, across and within a digital world. We explain what it means to ‘think-with’ Anzac and unveil a range of different encounters with it by our research participants. We explore how Anzac conjures feelings of collectivity, connecting people to eac...
Book
‘How does Anzac feel? Why does it continue to have such a hold on the Australian imagination? And how are digital technologies affecting the ways that we experience Anzac? These are the questions at the heart of this compelling and innovative new book by Danielle Drozdzewski, Shanti Sumartojo and Emma Waterton. It argues convincingly for a new geog...
Article
Full-text available
As a place of heritage, the Port Arthur Historic Site in Tasmania, Australia, provides a substantial representation of a colonial landscape. Principally associated with Australia’s convict history, the vestiges that are found there today take the form of extant buildings, shorelines, cemeteries, exercise yards and cells. Port Arthur is also thought...
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Remembrance of war and conflict exposes the intricate interweaving of cultural memory and identity. Nations commemorate war to link narratives of the past with the present. This linking creates shared national narratives that temporally reinforce identities across the geography of the nation and among diverse citizenry. In this paper, the authors t...
Article
Full-text available
This systematic review aims to understand the impact of heritage tourism on sustainable community development, including the health and wellbeing of local host communities. The protocol is guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. It highlights the scope and methodology for the...
Article
What happens when a naval vessel (in this case, HMS Belfast) is converted into a floating museum? This paper approaches this question with the concepts of assemblage and more‐than‐representational thought, in which the materialisation of the past is generative of a range of potentials that can shape encounters in the present. HMS Belfast is dedicat...
Book
This new edition of The Routledge Companion to Landscape Studies contains an updated and expanded selection of original chapters which explore research directions in an array of disciplines sharing a concern for ‘landscape’, a term which has many uses and meanings. It features 33 revised and/or updated chapters and 14 entirely new chapters on topic...
Article
In a bid to join recent efforts to develop innovative approaches to heritage, this article argues that adopting a collaborative mode of inquiry is a useful way of coming to terms with the plurality of ways heritage landscapes are enlivened by their visitors. It also points to some of the advantages of incorporating researchers’ personal experiences...
Article
This article intervenes in the debate about whether and how the ‘Frontier Wars’ should be represented in Australia’s military heritage. If they were to be represented, those who resisted British colonial occupation would figure as Aboriginal patriots in a renovated heritage of Australian service to country. We point out, however, that certain histo...
Article
This article presents a field analysis of heritage tastes and patterns of engagements in Australia. Using multiple correspondence analysis, it examines a dimension of data collected as part of the 2014–2015 national survey on Australian cultural practices. The data are positioned against the recently published Australian Heritage Strategy, released...
Chapter
Full-text available
In Australia, ‘authentic’ Aboriginal heritage is almost exclusively recognized as ‘pre-colonial’ and non-metropolitan, with traces of such heritage seldom showcased in Australian cities (Hinkson 2003; Byrne 2003). This confinement of ‘authentic’ Aboriginal heritage to pre-contact, rural Australia was commenced by anthropologists in the early twenti...
Chapter
Cultural heritage is a process, a discourse, a political reality, an economic opportunity, and a social arena as well as sites, objects, and performances. As such heritage “does work.” And as work cultural heritage is a cultural tool that is deployed broadly in society today. Heritage is at work in indigenous and vernacular communities, in urban de...
Chapter
This chapter reports on a collaborative community project to restore a Tibetan Buddhist monastery (gompa) in the village of Langtang, Nepal. The restoration work has been entirely local led and executed by traditional artisans. Through a combined analysis of selective changes to the materiality of the gompa, as well as 19 unstructured interviews wi...
Chapter
Heritage, in its many forms and practices, is not just a representation of the past; it is also a connection or a reconnection with the past that is active and alive in the present. An understanding of this “doing” of heritage is more important than ever in differentiating national, official and authorized versions of it from its more local, volunt...
Article
This paper explores the nexus of historical geography and heritage studies, using the case study of the Sovereign Hill outdoor museum in Ballarat, Australia. It reports on the application of more-than-representational thinking to spaces of heritage, and advances the argument that Sovereign Hill can be usefully understood as a semiotic landscape ani...
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Full-text available
This photo essay explores intimations of Nepal’s heritage – tangible, intangible and ‘living’ – with a focus on the earthquake-ravaged city of Kathmandu. Linking heritage with wider observations about social and cultural resilience, the photos and accompanying text draw attention to the complex processes of social dynamism and cultural resourcefuln...
Book
In this textbook we see heritage in action in indigenous and vernacular communities, in urban development and regeneration schemes, in expressions of community, in acts of nostalgia and memorialization and counteracts of forgetting, in museums and other spaces of representation, in tourism, in the offices of those making public policy, and in the p...
Book
Travel and Representation is a timely volume of essays that explores and re-examines the various convergences between literature, art, photography, television, cinema and travel. The essays do so in a way that appreciates the entanglement of representations and travel at a juncture in theoretical work that recognizes the limits of representation, t...
Article
For centuries, if not millennia, the north–south valley systems of Nepal’s Himalayas have acted as a capillary network for communication, exchange, veneration, discriminating cultural difference and measuring out (early-)state power. One valley, in particular, the Kali Gandaki in Mustang, is a palimpsest overlaid with complex socialized and politic...
Article
The terms memory, place and identity exemplify the core concerns of geographical inquiry – focusing on linkages between people, place, and culture. In this review, we hone in on the intersections between these three terms in the context of the remembrance of war and conflict. We seek to highlight how memory informs the construction and maintenance...
Article
Academic interest in Australia’s heritage field has developed primarily around the ways its subject has been used to support dominant national interests. Understandings of heritage, however, are increasingly shaped by developments occurring in other nation-states, as well as those occurring at the international level. This article considers the cha...
Article
Smiles Sam & Moser Stephanie (ed.). Envisioning the Past: Archaeology and the Image. xiv+246 pages, 19 illustrations. 2005. Oxford & Malden (MA): Blackwell; 1-4051-1151-8 hardback £60 & 1-4051-1150-X paperback £19.99. - Volume 80 Issue 310 - Emma Waterton
Article
Book reviews - Casella Eleanor Conlin & Fowler Chris (ed.). The Archaeology of Plural and Changing Identities: Beyond Identification. xii+272 pages, 27 illustrations 15 tables. 2005. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum; 978-0-306-48693-7 hardback £69 & $99; 978-0-306-48694-4 paperback £29.50. - Volume 81 Issue 313 - Emma Waterton
Article
This chapter surveys the term ‘community’ in relation to heritage management practices. It begins by offering an historical overview of the term before turning to assess methods of engagement. The chapter concludes by offering an exploration of the wider ethical implications tangled up with community engagement projects within the field of heritage...
Article
Full-text available
Battlefields have a particular hold on the imagination, inviting those who visit them to make conscious links between physical places and what is known to have happened there. People may align themselves with one or other of the protagonists and celebrate or regret a victory or defeat. Beyond the partisan, however, there is also the human response;...
Article
Full-text available
This photo essay explores the notion of cultural resiliency in the Nepali Himalayas, and carries a geographic focus that is centred on the village of Langtang. Our interest in capturing this area photographically emerges from several recent fieldwork excursions to Nepal and associated experiences of trekking through two distinct areas: the Langtang...
Article
Full-text available
The issue of slavery has received wide media attention in response to the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade. Simultaneously, issues of multiculturalism and social exclusion have also been subject to tense debate. This paper aims to examine the rhetorical resources drawn upon at the juncture of these two areas of debate, particularly i...
Article
This paper examines how Indigenous cultures and their connections to country are presented to the public in protected areas through a textual analysis of interpretive signage. In protected areas, different representational tropes are used to interpret colonial/settler, natural heritage and Indigenous landscapes and places. This paper begins by expl...
Article
This review emerges out of long-standing debates that seek to define Australia's responses to its colonial heritage. In particular, the review will question how ‘affect’ functions as a foundation for shared public understandings of the past and related identities at iconic Australian heritage sites. From there, it will move to explore how visitor p...
Chapter
Heritage is a version of the past received through objects and display, representations and engagements, spectacular locations and events, memories and commemorations, and the preparation of places for cultural purposes and consumption. Collectively, these ‘things’ and practices have played a central role in structuring and defining the way heritag...
Book
Full-text available
This book explores heritage from a wide range of perspectives and disciplines and in doing so provides a distinctive and deeply relevant survey of the field as it is currently researched, understood and practiced around the world. Furthermore it establishes and develops through its various sections and chapters an accessible and clearly presented v...
Chapter
To arrive at some concluding thoughts for a volume that is so large, so varied and so complex seemed both foolhardy and essential — not a good combination. Yet not to have done so would have been to draw attention to the inherent weakness of such collections, which is that they are rarely able to arrive at cogent conclusions. But, if we put ‘cogent...
Chapter
Criminologists, perhaps more than other social scientists, are much exercised by the extent of what they do not know. Theirs is a field dominated by the efforts of the controlling state and its law enforcement apparatus to record criminal behaviour in all its myriad forms, gleaning information that is then used as a basis for policy-making and the...
Book
Full-text available
This book is a fast-paced and thorough re-evaluation of what heritage tourism means to the people who experience it. It draws on contemporary thinking in human geography and heritage studies, and applies it to a sector of tourism that is both pervasive yet poorly researched in terms of the perspective of tourists themselves. In a series of lucid an...
Article
This review examines debates situated at the intersection between heritage studies and geography, particularly those that revolve around more-than-representational theories. These theories, the review suggests, advance recent developments within the heritage field concerned with those senses of ‘the now’ so often left neglected by conventional unde...
Book
The imagination has long been associated with travel and tourism; from the seventeenth century when the showman and his peepshow box would take the village crowd to places, cities and lands through the power of stories, to today when we rely on a different range of boxes to whisk us away on our imaginative travels: the television, the cinema and th...
Article
Full-text available
This article takes as its focus the Australian War Memorial, including its collections, the physical infrastructure of the site, its staff and the range of people who encounter it as tourists, researchers or military personnel and their families. In taking up this interest, our intention is not to diminish, ignore or bypass the role of narrative an...
Book
The Olympic Games have evolved into the most prestigious sport event on the planet. As a consequence, each Games generates more and more interest from the academic community. Sociology, politics, geography and history have all played a part in helping to understand the meanings and implications of the Games. Heritage, too, offers invaluable insight...
Article
Heritage theory has developed piecemeal over the last 30 years, with little progress made in fully understanding the way the subject can or should be theorised. This paper identifies some of the main sources of theory in heritage, as well as the approaches and perspectives that have been formulated as a result. These are framed on the basis of thei...
Article
This article explores the ways in which the multiplicity of the meaning of heritage is overshadowed, so much so that a particular idea about 'heritage' has come to represent the dominant and legitimized way of thinking, writing, and talking about heritage management practices. It argues that the dominant way of seeing heritage-'authorized heritage...
Book
https://www.routledge.com/products/9780415611152
Article
This paper focuses upon the Potteries region in Staffordshire, UK and offers an examination of the ways in which people living there are actively and critically engaging with processes of identity and meaning-making. The overarching aim of the paper is to extend the analysis of labour history originally developed by Smith (200649. Smith , L. 2006 ....
Book
This book offers a critique of the dominant conceptualization of heritage found in policy, which tends to privilege the white, middle and upper classes. Using Britain as an illustration, Waterton explores how and why recent policies continue to lean towards the predictable melding of cultural diversity with tendencies of assimilation.
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates the cultural memory of the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in Britain. It examines official government responses and considers how these were replicated in popular culture, drawing on the film Amazing Grace. The study highlights the rhetoric employed to distance the past of the transatlantic slave trade fro...
Article
Full-text available
This paper revisits the notion of ‘community’ within the field of heritage, examining the varied ways in which tensions between different groups and their aspirations arise and are mediated. Our focus is a close examination of the conceptual disjunction that exists between a range of popular, political and academic attempts to define and negotiate...
Chapter
In the previous chapter, I brought the idea of ‘discourse’ to the forefront of the volume. This is a term that makes frequent appearances across a range of literature, so much so that it is often difficult to tell if its users are actually talking about the same thing. It is not, however, the usual kind of term to be found in texts about heritage....
Chapter
Throughout this volume, I have focused upon the relationships between heritage, public policy and power in an attempt to develop a critical understanding both of heritage and the way it is utilized as a tool of cultural governance. My intention was to add to the small, but growing number of publications that challenge us to produce new ways of thin...
Chapter
To this point I have argued that while the introduction of inclusion marked a concession of power within traditional heritage management practices, it was not a shift that signalled total surrender; indeed, the organizational power of the AHD remained something that was continually re-asserted and sustained, albeit in more sophisticated ways than s...
Chapter
The previous chapter documented the emergence of a particular way of seeing heritage. While the analysis emphasized the recurrence of a tight set of assumptions, invoked by the continued repetition of a common storyline, I was careful to make no suggestion that it would, or could, remain uncontested or unchanged. Indeed, the broader language of her...
Chapter
This chapter adds to an argument already developing in the heritage literature, which frames international policy — charters, conventions, declarations, recommendations, resolution and so forth — as something of an ‘offshore’ resource for domestic policymakers in a range of countries. As such, it is utilized and drawn upon by many different nations...
Chapter
During the same timeframe covered by the previous two chapters — roughly 2001 until 2009 — vigorous attempts to revise public policy took place in a range of national contexts. Such efforts were influenced by the events of 9/11, the subsequent ‘war on terror’ and a fear of home-grown terrorism, along with other acts of violence across the globe (no...
Chapter
In order to understand the heritage sector’s current configuration of politics, policy and power it is necessary to go back at least three decades to the 1970s, as it is in these decades that commentators on heritage identify a significant increase in public debate, policy activity and touristic interest in heritage (Wright 1985; Hewison 1987; Wals...
Article
The issue of slavery has received wide public and media attention in response to the bicentenary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act of 1807. In this context, admissions of guilt and apology are potent and confronting as they threaten to disrupt the collective self-understanding of Britain and the Empire. As such, the silenced narrative of mino...
Article
This paper explores the visual representations used to illustrate, promote and communicate a particular idea of heritage in the tourism literature, which provides an instance within which to examine the material consequences of a dominant discourse. This examination takes place within the context of current New Labour policy initiatives, which have...
Book
http://www.bloomsbury.com/au/heritage-communities-and-archaeology-9781472521330/
Chapter
Full-text available
https://www.routledge.com/series/KICH

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