Emma J. Hudgins

Emma J. Hudgins
Carleton University

PhD

About

42
Publications
10,380
Reads
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177
Citations
Introduction
I use computational methods to study the ecology, impacts, and management of invasive species at large scales. I’m interested in uncovering broad generalities that emerge across species as a consequence of anthropogenic processes. I’m also interested in creating better forecasts of future invasion patterns, and better recommendations for invasive species management.
Additional affiliations
May 2012 - September 2015
University of New Brunswick
Position
  • Field Assistant
Education
September 2015 - September 2016
McGill University
Field of study
  • Biology
September 2015 - September 2020
McGill University
Field of study
  • Biology
September 2011 - May 2015
McGill University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
The widespread use of species traits in basic and applied ecology, conservation and biogeography has led to an exponential increase in functional diversity analyses, with > 10 000 papers published in 2010–2020, and > 1800 papers only in 2021. This interest is reflected in the development of a multitude of theoretical and methodological frameworks f...
Preprint
Full-text available
The invasive emerald ash borer ( Agrilus planipennis ) causes damages to street trees estimated at US$ 900 million in the next 30 years. Although millions of dollars are spent annually to control this species, such approaches are often based on rules-of-thumb. Here, we reveal an optimal management strategy to protect urban trees in North America fr...
Article
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) is a highly vocal species with a repertoire of similar, yet acoustically distinct songs. These songs may be altered drastically if, as a nestling, the male goes deaf or becomes acoustically isolated. In deaf Red-winged Blackbirds, these dramatic song alterations may present as songs bearing slight resembla...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Biological invasions by amphibian and reptile species (i.e. herpetofauna) are numerous and widespread, having caused severe impacts on ecosystems, the economy and human health. However, there remains no synthesised assessment of the economic costs of these invasions. Therefore, using the most comprehensive database on the economic costs of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Researchers in ecology and evolutionary biology are increasingly dependent on computational code to conduct research, and the use of efficient methods to share, reproduce, and collaborate on code as well as any research-related documentation has become fundamental. GitHub is an online, cloud-based service that can help researchers track, organize,...
Article
Full-text available
The rate of biological invasions is growing unprecedentedly, threatening ecological and socioeconomic systems worldwide. Quantitative understandings of invasion temporal trajectories are essential to discern current and future economic impacts of invaders, and then to inform future management strategies. Here, we examine the temporal trends of cumu...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological and socioeconomic impacts from biological invasions are rapidly escalating worldwide. While effective management underpins impact mitigation, such actions are often delayed, insufficient or entirely absent. Presently, management delays emanate from a lack of monetary rationale to invest at early invasion stages, which precludes effective...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction pathways play a pivotal role in the success of Invasive Alien Species (IAS)—the subset of alien species that have a negative environmental and/or socio-economic impact. Pathways refer to the fundamental processes that leads to the introduction of a species from one geographical location to another—marking the beginning of all alien spe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Globalization challenges sustainability by intensifying the ecological and economic impacts of biological invasions. These impacts may be unevenly distributed worldwide, with costs disproportionately incurred by a few regions. Here, we identify how invasion economic costs are distributed among origin and recipient regions at country and continent l...
Preprint
Full-text available
The biological sciences community is increasingly recognizing the value of open, reproducible, and transparent research practices for science and society at large. Despite this recognition, many researchers remain reluctant to share their data and code publicly. This hesitation may arise from knowledge barriers about how to archive data and code, c...
Preprint
Full-text available
As alien invasive species are a key driver of biodiversity loss, understanding patterns of rapidly changing global species compositions depends upon knowledge of biological invasion dynamics and trends. The Ponto-Caspian region is among the most notable donor regions for aquatic invasive species in Europe. Using macroinvertebrate time series collec...
Article
Full-text available
The global increase in biological invasions is placing growing pressure on the management of ecological and economic systems. However, the effectiveness of current management expenditure is difficult to assess due to a lack of standardised measurement across spatial, taxonomic and temporal scales. Furthermore, there is no quantification of the spen...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding phenomena typical of complex systems is key for progress in ecology and conservation amidst escalating global environmental change. However, myriad definitions of complexity hamper conceptual advancements and synthesis. Ecological complexity may be better understood by following the strong theoretical basis of complexity science. We c...
Preprint
Ecological and socio-economic impacts from biological invasions are rapidly escalating worldwide. While effective management underpins impact mitigation, such actions are often delayed, insufficient or entirely absent. Presently, management delays emanate from a lack of monetary rationale to invest at early invasion stages, which precludes effectiv...
Article
Urban trees are important nature‐based solutions for future well‐being and liveability but are at high risk of mortality from insect pests. In the United States (US), 82% of the population live in urban settings and this number is growing, making urban tree mortality a matter of concern for most of its population. Until now, the magnitudes and spat...
Article
Invasive alien species (IAS) are a growing global ecological problem. Reports on the socioeconomic impacts of biological invasions are accumulating, but our understanding of temporal trends across regions and taxa remains scarce. Accordingly, we investigated temporal trends in the economic cost of IAS and cost-reporting literature using the InvaCos...
Preprint
Full-text available
The global increase in biological invasions is placing growing pressure on the management of ecological and economic systems. However, the effectiveness of current management expenditure is difficult to assess due to a lack of standardised measurement across spatial, taxonomic and temporal scales. Furthermore, there is no quantification of the spen...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biological invasions by amphibian and reptile species (i.e. herpetofauna) are numerous and widespread and have caused severe impacts on ecosystems, the economy and human health. However, there remains no synthesised assessment of the economic costs of these invasions. Therefore, using the most comprehensive database on the economic costs of invasiv...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive alien species (IAS) pose threats to native biodiversity globally and are linked to numerous negative biodiversity impacts throughout Canada. Considering the Canadian federal government’s commitments to environmental stewardship (e.g., the Convention on Biological Diversity), the successful management of IAS requires an understanding of how...
Preprint
Full-text available
The widespread use of species traits to infer community assembly mechanisms or to link species to ecosystem functions has led to an exponential increase in functional diversity analyses, with >10,000 papers published in 2010–2019, and >1,500 papers only in 2020. This interest is reflected in the development of a multitude of theoretical and methodo...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species can have severe impacts on ecosystems, economies, and human health. Though the economic impacts of invasions provide important foundations for management and policy, up-to-date syntheses of these impacts are lacking. To produce the most comprehensive estimate of invasive species costs within North America (including the Greater Ant...
Preprint
Full-text available
Urban trees are important nature-based solutions for future wellbeing and livability but are at high risk of mortality from insect pests. United States (US) urbanization levels are already at 82% and are growing, making urban tree mortality a matter of concern for the majority of its population. Until now, the magnitudes and spatial distributions o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Introduction pathways play a pivotal role in the success of Invasive Alien Species (IAS) – the subset of alien species that have a negative environmental and/or socio-economic impact. Pathways refer to the fundamental mechanism that leads to the introduction of a species outside of its native range – marking the beginning of all alien species invas...
Preprint
Full-text available
The rate of biological invasions is growing unprecedentedly, threatening ecological and socioeconomic systems worldwide. Quantitative understandings of invasion temporal trajectories are essential to discern current and future economic impacts of invaders, and then to inform future management strategies. Here, we examine the temporal trends of cumu...
Preprint
Ecological and socioeconomic impacts from biological invasions are rapidly escalating worldwide. While effective management underpins impact mitigation, such actions are often delayed, insufficient or entirely absent. Presently, management delays emanate from a lack of monetary rationale to invest at early invasion stages, which precludes effective...
Article
Full-text available
While generality is often desirable in ecology, customized models for individual species are thought to be more predictive by accounting for context‐specificity. However, fully customized models require more information for focal species. We focus on pest spread, and ask: how much does predictive power differ between generalized and customized mode...
Article
Estimating α‐diversity and species distributions provide baseline information to understand factors such as biodiversity loss and erosion of ecosystem services. Yet, species surveys typically cover a small portion of any country's landmass. Public, global databases could help, but contain biases. Thus, the magnitude of bias should be identified and...
Article
Full-text available
We used a citizen science-based data collection protocol to investigate foraging and nesting marine turtle populations in the Republic of Maldives. With the aid of citizen scientists, we collected nine months of data covering 12.5 % of the country, increasing the available sightings and nesting data by ~2,000 %. Data indicated that the Maldives are...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural responses of invasive animals to biotic interactions can inform predictions of their consumptive impacts; however, such biotic contexts are often overlooked. Here, we assessed the interacting effect of conspecific and higher-order predation risk on the per capita consumption and behaviours of the invasive freshwater amphipod Gammarus pu...
Article
Full-text available
We tested whether a general spread model could capture macroecological patterns across all damaging invasive forest pests in the United States. We showed that a common constant dispersal kernel model, simulated from the discovery date, explained 67.94% of the variation in range size across all pests, and had 68.00% locational accuracy between predi...
Presentation
Predicting the spread of organisms is of fundamental and applied interest in ecology. We tested whether a general spread model could capture macroecological patterns across all damaging invasive forest pests in the United States. We showed that a common constant dispersal kernel model, simulated from the discovery date, explained 67.94% of the vari...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Assessing the economic costs of biological invasions, for all taxa, all regions, all activity sectors, all types of economic costs, and much more!
Project
This work builds off of existing economic estimates of pest damage (Aukema et al. 2011) as well as forecasts of all-species pest spread derived from Hudgins et al. (2017). This project is very timely, given that this existing economic damage estimate does not employ species-specific spread predictions and is slightly out of date, but is frequently cited in the literature (263 citations) and used in policy recommendations (ISPM15; Haack et al. 2014). In their study, Aukema et al. (2011) found that urban trees were the main target of economic damage by forest pests. Further, Koch et al. (2018) have now created an extendable modelling framework for urban tree species in the Eastern US. Combining these two findings using GDK spread forecasts would allow for urban damages to be predicted in a species-specific, spatial fashion across US invasive forest pests.