Emily Woollen

Emily Woollen
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · School of GeoSciences

PhD

About

30
Publications
10,749
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
589
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
471 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction
I am an ecosystem ecologist, with expertise in terrestrial biogeochemistry, tropical forest ecology, and land use change. My current research has a focus in African woodlands, and I have extensive fieldwork experience working in southern Africa. My research uses a range of ecological measurement techniques and analyses such as gas flux, soil sampling, forest inventory, remote sensing and geographic information systems. Interdisciplinary research is also at the forefront of my current interests.
Additional affiliations
April 2014 - April 2017
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • The ACES project, working to understand how woodland loss is changing ecosystem services and wellbeing of the rural poor in Mozambique (miomboaces.wordpress.com/)
October 2013 - March 2014
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Developing the Small-Holder Agriculture Monitoring and Baseline Assessment tool (SHAMBA); a greenhouse gas accounting approach for Climate Smart Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa (http://shambatool.wordpress.com/).
April 2013 - present
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • Supervisor
Description
  • Secondary supervisor to a PhD student
Education
September 2008 - December 2012
The University of Edinburgh
Field of study
  • Carbon dynamics of African miombo woodlands
September 2004 - September 2008
The University of Edinburgh
Field of study
  • Environmental Science (Ecological Science)

Publications

Publications (30)
Preprint
Full-text available
Land use change (LUC) is the leading cause of biodiversity loss worldwide. However, the global understanding of LUC's impact on biodiversity is mainly based on comparisons of land use endpoints (habitat vs non-habitat) in forest ecosystems. Hence, it may not generalise to savannas, which are ecologically distinct from forests, as they are inherentl...
Article
The idea that tropical forest and savanna are alternative states is crucial to how we manage these biomes and predict their future under global change. Large-scale empirical evidence for alternative stable states is limited, however, and comes mostly from the multimodal distribution of structural aspects of vegetation. These approaches have been cr...
Article
Significance We develop a biogeographic approach to analyzing the presence of alternative stable states in tropical biomes. Whilst forest–savanna bistability has been widely hypothesized and modeled, empirical evidence has remained scarce and controversial, and here, applying our method to Africa, we provide large-scale evidence that there are alte...
Article
Full-text available
Intensifying land use is often seen as a corollary of improving rural livelihoods in developing countries. However, land use intensification (LUI) frequently has unintended impacts on ecosystem services (ES), which may undermine the livelihoods of the same people who could benefit from intensification. Poorer households are disproportionately depen...
Article
Agriculture is one of the main engines for prosperity and economic growth in Africa but effective agricultural strategies to support rural development and poverty alleviation are not yet identified. While state investment in the small-scale farming sector is minimal, and the medium-scale “emergent” household farm sector remains underrepresented, la...
Data
This dataset includes data collected as part of the Abrupt Changes in Ecosystem Services (ACES) project on the composition, income (including consumption and sale of environmental resources), ownership of assets (e.g. farming equipment, household furnishings and own transport) and wellbeing of respondent households in rural Mozambique. Data are als...
Article
Aim In tropical Africa, savannas cover huge areas, have high plant species richness and are considered as a major natural resource for most countries. There is, however, little information available on their floristics and biogeography at the continental scale, despite the importance of such information for our understanding of the drivers of speci...
Article
Full-text available
Sub-Saharan Africa's charcoal sector is rarely considered a mechanism for rural development or poverty alleviation; instead, current regulations often marginalise rural producers. The development of a sustainable sector, that does not further marginalise rural populations, is restricted by limited understanding of these stakeholders. We assess the...
Article
Full-text available
Charcoal is an important source of energy and income for millions of people in Africa. Its production often drives forest degradation and deforestation which have impacts on the local people that remain poorly understood. We present a novel methodology for analysing the contribution of woodland ecosystem services (ES) to rural well-being and povert...
Data
This dataset comprises 259 smallholder agricultural field surveys collected from twenty-six villages across three Districts in Mozambique, Africa. Surveys were conducted in ten fields in each of six villages in Mabalane District, Gaza Province, ten villages in Marrupa District, Niassa Province, and ten villages in Gurue District, Zambezia Province....
Article
Full-text available
The charcoal industry is among the most important semiformal economic sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa and a key cash income source for local households who produce it. This has intensified the debate as to the role of income from charcoal production in the alleviation of rural poverty. While in a number of cases charcoal production has been identifie...
Article
Tree phenology mediates land–atmosphere mass and energy exchange and is a determinant of ecosystem structure and function. In the dry tropics, including African savannas, many trees grow new leaves during the dry season – weeks or months before the rains typically start. This syndrome of pre-rain green-up has long been recognized at small scales, b...
Article
Full-text available
African woodlands form a major part of the tropical grassy biome and support the livelihoods of millions of rural and urban people. Charcoal production in particular is a major economic activity, but its impact on other ecosystem services is little studied. To address this, our study collected biophysical and social datasets, which were combined in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Charcoal production can lead to changes in ecosystem services provision and forest degradation while also significantly contributing to rural income and poverty alleviation. In urban centres of Mozambique, charcoal is the major energy source for cooking. Growing demand drives high wood extraction rates over increasing areas of forest. As such, unde...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Charcoal production is thought to cause degradation of forests and woodlands, affecting other ecosystem services related to woody biomass. However, the link between charcoal production and other ecosystem services remains unclear, and we do not know which services might be affected or how this might impact on livelihood resources. Mapping charcoal...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster Presentation: “Scrutinizing commercial agricultural expansion in Mozambique: impacts on ecosystem services and livelihoods”. GLOBAL LAND PROJECT OPEN SCIENCE MEETING “Land Transformations: Between Global Challenges and Local Realities”, organized by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme and the International Human Dimensions Progra...
Thesis
Africa’s carbon (C) cycle is one of the least well understood components of the global C cycle. Miombo woodlands are the most common woodland type in southern Africa, but despite their vast extent and importance in the biogeochemical cycles of Africa, their C dynamics are not well understood. This thesis addresses a set of science questions related...
Article
Full-text available
Current knowledge of Africa’s carbon (C) pools is limited despite its importance in the global C budget. To increase the understanding of C stocks in African woodlands, we asked how C stocks in soil and vegetation vary across a miombo woodland landscape and to what degree and at what scales are these stocks linked? We sampled along a 5-km transect...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon emissions from tropical land‐use change are a major uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. In African woodlands, small‐scale farming and the need for fuel are thought to be reducing vegetation carbon stocks, but quantification of these processes is hindered by the limitations of optical remote sensing and a lack of ground data. Here, we pre...
Article
Full-text available
Background: It is essential that systems for measuring changes in carbon stocks for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) projects are accurate, reliable and low-cost. Widely used systems involving classifying optical satellite data can underestimate degradation, and by classifying the landscape ignore the natural heterogenei...
Article
The proposed REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) protocol will only succeed in reducing emissions if deforestation and degradation can be accurately monitored. Ground surveys are prohibitively expensive over large areas, so satellite monitoring will be essential for independently monitoring deforestation and degradation rat...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Archived project
ACES is a research project funded by ESPA. It involves scientists and practitioners from Mozambique, the UK, Sweden, Zimbabwe and Brazil. We are working to understand how the livelihoods of rural people in the miombo and mopane woodlands of Mozambique change as the landscape is converted from woodlands to agriculture.
Project
We are working to understand how the livelihoods of rural people in the miombo and mopane woodlands of Mozambique change as the landscape is converted from woodlands to agriculture.