Emily K White

Emily K White
The MetroHealth System · Department of Psychiatry

PhD

About

19
Publications
3,896
Reads
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653
Citations
Citations since 2016
7 Research Items
577 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction
Dr. Emily White is a licensed clinical psychologist in the state of Ohio. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2016 from the University of Nevada Las Vegas. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and her postdoctoral fellowship in Health Psychology at the Cleveland Clinic.
Additional affiliations
May 2018 - present
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
November 2016 - September 2017
Cleveland Clinic
Position
  • Instructor
September 2016 - September 2017
Cleveland Clinic
Position
  • Health Psychology Fellow
Education
September 2016 - September 2017
Cleveland Clinic
Field of study
  • Health Psychology
August 2015 - August 2016
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Field of study
  • Clinical Psychology Internship
August 2010 - December 2016
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Field of study
  • Clinical Psychology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
The nature and presentation of eating pathology in ethnically diverse men are not well defined. This study examined associations among ethnicity, body image, and eating pathology in nonclinical college men (N = 343). Analysis of variance analyses indicated that markers of eating, weight, and shape concerns differed by ethnicity: Asian and Hispanic/...
Article
Objective Eating disorders (EDs) and social anxiety disorder (SAD) are highly co‐occurring. This comorbidity is extremely relevant, given that individuals with comorbid ED‐SAD are less likely to seek and/or benefit from ED treatment. Method We used network analysis to conceptualize ED‐SAD comorbidity in a sample of 2,215 participants with a primar...
Article
Background: Sleep disorders in multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and depression. However, research investigating and comparing how the two most common sleep disorders-insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)-affect depression and HRQOL in MS is limited. The goal of this study is to examine...
Article
Background: Most skin cancers occur on the head and neck, areas of the body that are significant to an individual's body image (BI) perception. Poor BI is a robust risk factor for depression and decreased quality of life. Thus, patients with nonmelanoma head and neck skin cancer (NMHNSC) may be more vulnerable to BI disturbance and the negative se...
Article
Background: Skin cancer commonly occurs on areas that are salient to body image perception (i.e., head and neck). Patients with head and neck skin cancer (HNSC) may experience negative body image perceptions related to their disease, which is concerning, given the numerous negative sequelae of poor body image. However, there are no existing diseas...
Article
Objective: Body checking (BC) and body image avoidance (BIA) have been proposed as etiological and maintaining mechanisms for eating disorder (ED) pathology. To date, no comprehensive review summarizes the relationships of BC and BIA with ED pathology, body image dissatisfaction, or mood/affect. Method: Meta-analyses examined the relationships o...
Article
Objective: We examined whether media exposure and media-induced stress contributed to eating disorder behaviors immediately and over the course of a day in women with anorexia nervosa (AN). Method: Women with AN (N = 118) completed a 2-week ecological momentary assessment protocol during which they reported on exposure to food, shape, or weight-...
Article
Objective: The overarching purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among acculturative stress, self-esteem, and eating pathology in Asian American and Latina female college students. Method: Participants (N = 638, mean age = 19.88) completed self-report measures of the variables of interest online. Results: Bivariate correlation...
Article
While the Body Checking Questionnaire (BCQ; Reas et al., 2002) is the most commonly-used measure of body checking behaviors, findings on the factor structure in nonclinical samples are mixed. This study investigated the factor structure and psychometric properties of the BCQ among nonclinical college women. In Study 1 (n=326), an exploratory factor...
Article
Full-text available
Although there are several recent reviews of the pre-operative factors that influence treatment outcome for bariatric surgery, commensurate efforts to identify and review the predictive validity of post-operative variables are lacking. This review describes the post-operative psychosocial predictors of weight loss in bariatric surgery. Results sugg...
Article
Social anxiety and eating pathology frequently co-occur. However, there is limited research examining the relationship between anxiety and body checking, aside from one study in which social physique anxiety partially mediated the relationship between body checking cognitions and body checking behavior (Haase, Mountford, & Waller, 2007). In an inde...
Article
Social anxiety and eating disorders are highly comorbid. Social appearance anxiety (i.e., fear of negative evaluation of one's appearance), general fear of negative evaluation, and perfectionism have each been proposed as risk factors for both social anxiety disorder and the eating disorders. However, no research to date has examined all three fact...
Article
Full-text available
Obesity and other eating-related problems are widespread and are associated with harmful physical, psychological, and social problems. The dramatic increases in rates of pediatric obesity has created a mounting need for psychologists and other mental health care providers to play a significant role in the assessment and treatment of youth with eati...
Chapter
The purpose of this chapter is to review the literature on family-based lifestyle interventions for pediatric obesity, which are currently the most well-established treatments for pediatric obesity to date (9,10). This chapter also explains the specific role of parents as key partners in child weight loss within these interventions, critically revi...

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