Emily Slesinger

Emily Slesinger
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA · Alaska Fisheries Science Center

PhD

About

7
Publications
1,018
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32
Citations
Introduction
I am a postdoc through the National Research Council, working out of the NOAA Alaskas Fisheries Science Center on interactive effects of ocean acidification and warming on larval fish physiology. My broad research goals are to use physiology, reproductive biology, and ecology as tools to investigate the impacts of climate change on economically important fish species to allow sustainable fishing under a changing environment.

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
Fish reproduction is energetically costly, leading to a suite of energy allocation strategies for maximizing lifetime reproductive potential. Assessing energetic allocation for species that inhabit a wide distributional range can provide insight into different strategies found across individuals and populations. The Northern stock of black sea bass...
Article
Full-text available
Statistical models built using different data sources and methods can exhibit conflicting patterns. We used the northern stock of black sea bass (Centropristis striata) as a case study to assess the impacts of using different fisheries data sources and laboratory-derived physiological metrics in the development of thermal habitat models for marine...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean warming is leading to poleward range shifts for many fish species, and while well described, potential life history phenology differences within fish populations along a gradient from their historic to current distributional range have not been studied. In a rapidly shifting fish population, the Northern stock of black sea bass (Centropristis...
Article
The influence of a warming climate on patterns of abundance and seasonality of the lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi is of interest worldwide, especially in regions where the species occurs at or near the limits of its thermal niche or is shifting its spatial distribution poleward. A 47-year (1972–2019) time series of weekly observations of M. le...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, ocean temperature on the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf (U.S. NES) has warmed faster than the global average and is associated with observed distribution changes of the northern stock of black sea bass (Centropristis striata). Mechanistic models based on physiological responses to environmental conditions can improve future...
Article
Full-text available
Grace Saba was incorrectly denoted as corresponding author. Emily Slesinger is corresponding author and the corresponding author email address is correct.
Preprint
Full-text available
Over the last decade, ocean temperature in the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf (U.S. NES) has warmed faster than the global average and is associated with observed distribution changes of the northern stock of black sea bass ( Centropristis striata ). Mechanistic models based on physiological responses to environmental conditions can improve futur...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Assess if rapidly shifting marine species can adapt their spawning in their newly occupied range and potential impacts on reproduction. This is particularly interesting for migratory fish and those that span a large latitudinal spawning range. We are investigating this in black sea bass, stay tuned for paper in press!
Project
Determine the differences between black sea bass energy and fecundity pre-, during, and post-spawning throughout their entire range (Virginia to Massachusetts). Focusing on both the effects of temperature during spawning and distance traveled before spawning.