Emily R Reid-Musson

Emily R Reid-Musson
University of Waterloo | UWaterloo

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
4,201
Reads
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211
Citations
Citations since 2017
20 Research Items
203 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030405060

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Globally, fisheries have been the site of multiple documented outbreaks of COVID-19. Existing studies point to the threat posed by the pandemic to livelihoods and health among migrant industrial fishery workers, small-scale fish harvesters, and fishing communities. They show the pandemic enhanced safety, economic, social and political layers of vul...
Article
Full-text available
Under the Canadian labour laws that govern workplace safety, wage, and other work conditions, ‘family’ workers are not covered by the law under special rules for agriculture. Among other legal exclusions, the family farm exclusion contributes to a dearth of basic work, health, and safety standards in the sector, despite the commercialization and in...
Article
Weather is a key factor influencing occupational health and safety (OHS) in the fishing sector, and this relationship is the subject of a growing body of research. However, the issue is rarely considered through a governance lens. Drawing from a larger study of weather and fishing safety in Atlantic Canada, the current paper examines a regional wea...
Article
Full-text available
Lobster fishing has become a cornerstone of commercial fisheries in Atlantic Canada, but there is limited research on safety in this fishery. The season openings of lobster fisheries are often associated with spikes in emergency incidents because vessels are heavily loaded with traps and there is often a rush to claim preferred fishing grounds. Thi...
Article
Both Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have focused significant time and resources towards improving their forecast products. However, weather prediction remains an imperfect science, and as such, it is not unusual for meteorologists to prioritize accuracy over consistency or vice v...
Article
Full-text available
US rules on child agricultural labour have remained largely unchanged since the 1960s. In 2011, the U.S. Department of Labour (DOL) announced a rulemaking proposal to limit child farm labour, especially for migrant children. Yet by 2012, the DOL abandoned its proposed changes following heavy opposition. Based on a random sample and grounded themati...
Article
Commercial fish harvesters are one of the primary users of marine forecasts, and rely heavily on these reports to manage weather hazards in their work at sea. Despite the intrinsic user-producer connection between forecasters and fish harvesters, there are minimal opportunities for these groups to interact directly. The article draws from findings...
Article
Scholars have recently begun to account for the absence of feminist analyses in the popular and academic discourse surrounding ‘the future of work’. In this article we offer a critical synthesis of emerging research from feminist economic geography to propose a series of questions about the future of work, conceptualized as both an object of intell...
Article
Full-text available
Many large North American cities have jurisdiction over licensing rules that shape the employment and health conditions of ride-hail and taxi drivers. Yet, there is a lack of research on the role of licensing agencies relating to the occupational health and safety conditions of taxi work. Based on qualitative research, the paper explores municipal...
Article
Full-text available
Workers actively negotiate contradictions between discourses of flexibility and entrepreneurialism and actually existing conditions of risk and precarity endemic to online self‐employed work. This article examines how ride‐hail drivers counter‐branded UberPool—a carpool ride‐hail service—as ‘UberPoo’. While marketed as a solution to congestion, Ube...
Article
Introduction: For-hire driving work, such as taxi driving, is characterized by long hours of sedentary behaviour, passenger assault, lack of benefits or support, and isolating working conditions that jeopardize good health. The for-hire driving industry has recently expanded to include a new group of ride-share drivers from digital platforms such a...
Article
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Introduction Uber ride-sharing is an important sharing economy challenge. The taxi industry is notoriously dangerous; even regulated and licensed professional drivers face a homicide rate higher than police officers and first responders. Uber drivers lack special licenses, organised workplaces and other usual safety structures. However, Uber touts...
Conference Paper
Introduction To ensure the health and safety of workers, most jurisdictions have implemented workplace inspection and audit systems. This presentation examines OHS in the context of the growing ‘sharing economy’, taking the case of Uber ride-sharing, who claim to keep self-employed drivers safe through measures including peer-to-peer ratings. We ad...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores bicycling practices among migrant farmworkers in rural southwestern Ontario, Canada. Migrant farmworkers are legally authorized to work in Canada for designated farm operations for up to eight months a year. Migrants lack access to cars in rural regions where motorized travel predominates. Consequently, bicycling is an essenti...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines rhythmanalysis within the context of Henri Lefebvre’s critique of everyday life and identifies gaps in his framework from the vantage point of intersectional feminist scholarship. Intersectional rhythmanalysis, I argue, provides a framework through which to conceptualize the braiding together of rhythms, social categories of d...
Article
Full-text available
Migrant farmworkers in Canada's Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP) are bound by unfree labor relations. Migrants are employed by and live adjacent to Canadian family farms. Extending current research on Canada's SAWP, I specifically conceptualize the family farm as a locus of unfree labor relations. The article identifies how employers imp...
Article
So-called ‘transient workers’ from Quebec and Atlantic Canada made up a significant proportion of Ontario’s tobacco harvest workforce in the postwar era, though there is no existing research on this migrant population. Based on analysis of an unexamined archive, the article explores the relationship between seasonal transient workers, Ontario tobac...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The study examines how farmers and farm associations invoke family farm ideals in lawmaking process and how these ideals affect workplace health rights and protections in agriculture. Generously funded by a SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2018-2020)