Emily Lindsey

Emily Lindsey
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County · Rancho La Brea

Doctor of Philosophy

About

52
Publications
79,635
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
3,862
Citations
Introduction
Emily Lindsey is Assistant Curator and Excavation Site Director at the La Brea Tar Pits, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.
Additional affiliations
March 2015 - October 2015
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (52)
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying the niche of contemporary and fossil organisms is key to identifying the primary factors driving species and community dynamics through time, in particular teasing apart abiotic and biotic drivers of change. However, niche quantification can be difficult due to short time spans (for contemporary systems), time averaging (for fossil syst...
Article
Full-text available
Reconstructing the behavior of extinct species is challenging, particularly for those with no living analogues. However, damage preserved as paleopathologies on bone can record how an animal moved in life, potentially reflecting behavioral patterns. Here, we assess hypothesized etiologies of pathology in a pelvis and associated right femur of a Smi...
Article
Full-text available
Informal learning environments, such as museums, provide unique opportunities for science learning. They are deliberately designed to impact public understanding of science and shape visitors’ attitudes and behaviors. As a developing technology, augmented reality (AR) offers the transformative potential to support museums’ educational missions by e...
Article
The Rancho La Brea locality is world famous for asphaltic deposits that trapped and preserved late Pleistocene megafauna over the last 50,000 years. This wealth of paleontological data allows for detailed investigation into paleoecological changes through the last glacial maximum into the Holocene. Here, we used dental mesowear analyses to infer di...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate determination of geographic location and three-dimensional orientation of objects recovered from the subsurface has numerous applications in the environmental, engineering and historical sciences, to name but a few major areas of research. Studies relying on accurate representations of natural and man-made objects in-situ prior to removal...
Chapter
Evidence from various climate proxies provides us with increasingly reliable proof that only in the past 10 millennia were natural systems more or less as we see them at the present (without considering human impact). Prior to 10,000 years ago, natural systems repeatedly changed under the influence of an unstable climate. This is particularly true...
Article
Full-text available
As fossilized feces, coprolites represent direct evidence of animal behavior captured in the fossil record. They encapsulate past ecological interactions between a consumer and its prey and, when they contain plant material, can also guide paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Here we describe the first coprolites from the lagerstätte Rancho La Brea...
Preprint
Full-text available
Reconstructing the behavior of extinct species is challenging, particularly for those with no living analogues. However, damage preserved as paleopathologies on bone can record how an animal moved in life, potentially reflecting behavioral patterns. Here, we assess hypothesized etiologies of pathology in a pelvis and associated right femur of a Smi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The locality Rancho La Brea (the La Brea Tar Pits, Los Angeles, California) is famous for its rich Late Pleistocene fossil record. Excavations began in the early 1900s through exploration of over 100 deposits, which took the form of man-made “pits”. Though asphalt is an effective preservative agent for numerous biological tissues (bone, cellulose,...
Conference Paper
Prolonged glacial and interglacial stages, more abrupt stadial and interstadial shifts, fluctuating atmospheric carbon concentrations, and large-magnitude faunal extinctions in the late Pleistocene had well-studied impacts on vegetation. But these studies have generally been conducted on relatively coarse spatial and taxonomic scales, and may not r...
Article
Full-text available
Drivers of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions are relevant to modern conservation policy in a world of growing human population density, climate change, and faunal decline. Traditional debates tend toward global solutions, blaming either dramatic climate change or dispersals of Homo sapiens to new regions. Inherent limitations to archaeological...
Article
Sixteen taxa comprising extinct megafauna and extant species from a single asphalt deposit (Project 23, Deposit 1) at Rancho La Brea were isotopically analyzed (δ¹³C, δ¹⁵N, δ³⁴S) and ¹⁴C dated to investigate paleoecology and feeding behavior of terrestrial vertebrates in southern California during the late Pleistocene. The large majority of the ¹⁴C...
Article
Full-text available
The extinction of Pleistocene megafauna and the role played by humans have been subjects of constant debate in American archeology. Previous evidence from the Pampas region of Argentina suggested that this environment might have provided a refugium for the Holocene survival of several megamammals. However, recent excavations and more advanced accel...
Conference Paper
Tanque Loma B2: Cuando la Brea no pudo atrapar a la megafauna. Las trampas de brea constituyen uno de los sitios paleontológicos más importantes donde se pueden encontrar restos de megafauna fósiles.. Existen varios yacimientos de este tipo destacando, Rancho la Brea en Estados Unidos, Las Breas de San Felipe en Cuba, Orocual en Venezuela, Pitch L...
Article
Full-text available
The School and Teacher Programs of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County have partnered with the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum (LBTPM) and the Invertebrate Paleontology (LACMIP) collection to create two “citizen curation” exercises dubbed “Project Paleo”. Classroom kits were created with unsorted fossils from either LBPTM or from a local i...
Poster
Recently discovered asphaltic fossil deposits at Rancho La Brea (Los Angeles, California, USA), collectively named “Project 23”, provide new opportunities to study microvertebrates with improved spatial and temporal context for this site. Our goal is to understand ecological dynamics within the small mammal assemblages in this region over thousands...
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND: The pace and magnitude of human-caused global change has accelerated dramatically over the past 50 years, overwhelming the capacity of many ecosystems and species to maintain themselves as they have under the more stable conditions that prevailed for at least 11,000 years. The next few decades threaten even more rapid transformations be...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding extinction drivers in a human-dominated world is necessary to preserve biodiversity. We provide an overview of Quaternary extinctions and compare mammalian extinction events on continents and islands after human arrival in system-specific prehistoric and historic contexts. We highlight the role of body size and life-history traits in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
El estudio de la biodiversidad del pasado en la península de Santa Elena se limita a varias contribuciones realizadas durante la primera mitad del siglo 20 y algunas publicaciones recientes (por ejemplo: Spillmann, 1931, 1938; Hoffstetter, 1952; Edmund 1965; Lindsey, 2010; Lindsey y López, 2014). La mayor parte de estos estudios se limitaron a peri...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Las rocas que afloran en la provincia de Santa Elena (región occidental de Ecuador) tienen edades comprendidas entre el Cretácico y el Pleistoceno (Hoffstetter, 1948, 1952). En los depósitos del Pleistoceno asociados a emanaciones bituminosas se conoce una rica y variada fauna de macromamíferos (Spillmann, 1931, 1938, 1941, 1942; Hoffstetter, 1948,...
Article
Full-text available
A simple quantitative approach is presented for determining the relative importance of climate change and human impact in driving late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions. This method is designed to determine whether climate change or human impact alone can account for these extinctions, or whether both were important, acting independently (additivel...
Article
Full-text available
Loss of megafauna, an aspect of defaunation, can precipitate many ecological changes over short time scales. We examine whether megafauna loss can also explain features of lasting ecological state shifts that occurred as the Pleistocene gave way to the Holocene. We compare ecological impacts of late-Quaternary megafauna extinction in five American...
Article
Full-text available
South America lost around 52 genera of mammals during a worldwide event known as the Late Quaternary Extinction episode. More than 80% of South American mammals weighing >44 kg succumbed. Analysis of the megafaunal extinction chronology in relation to human arrival and major climate changes have revealed slightly different extinction patterns in di...
Article
Full-text available
Asphaltic deposits, or " tar pits, " present a unique opportunity to investigate the paleobiology and paleoecology of Quaternary mammals due to their tendency to accumulate and preserve remains of numerous taxa. This role is especially important in areas with low preservation potential or incomplete sampling, such as the Neotropics. Currently, the...
Article
Full-text available
Human impacts have left and are leaving distinctive imprints in the geological record. Here we show that in North America, the human-caused changes evident in the mammalian fossil record since c. 14,000 years ago are as pronounced as earlier faunal changes that subdivide Cenozoic epochs into the North American Land Mammal Ages (NALMAs). Accordingly...
Article
Full-text available
Palaeontologists characterize mass extinctions as times when the Earth loses more than three-quarters of its species in a geologically short interval, as has happened only five times in the past 540 million years or so. Biologists now suggest that a sixth mass extinction may be under way, given the known species losses over the past few centuries a...
Article
Full-text available
South America lost more genera in the Quaternary megafaunal extinction than any other continent, but how it fits into the worldwide extinction has been unclear largely due to the lack of chronological resolution. This work evaluated 138 published radiocarbon dates for megafauna and 402 published dates for early (>8000 BP) South American archaeologi...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Evaluating changes (or lack there of) in small mammal community structure and niche utilization through time (50ka to ~30ka)