Emily Huddart Kennedy

Emily Huddart Kennedy
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Sociology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

57
Publications
43,330
Reads
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1,302
Citations
Citations since 2017
27 Research Items
1013 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - present
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2014 - June 2018
Washington State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2012 - August 2014
University of Alberta
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Local food movements rely on engaged farmers, gardeners, and shoppers to challenge the conventional food system through consumer-based tactics by advocating food systems change to reduce social injustice and environmental harm. While much literature engages in debate over the efficacy of such “lifestyle movements” to effect change, little analysis...
Article
The authors use survey and interview data from California homeowners to understand customers’ trust in their utility company. The authors find that customers’ beliefs about the reliability of electricity do not predict trust. Instead, what matters are beliefs that the utility company does a bad job managing customer service, costs, and wildfires. D...
Article
Research on the tastes of higher status groups has long prioritized analysis of aesthetic preferences. However, recent work has brought more attention to the moral dimensions of tastes. In this paper, we investigate the intersection of morality and aesthetics in tastes. Drawing on survey data and focus groups, we investigate how aesthetic and moral...
Article
Full-text available
Americans are politically polarized in their views on environmental protection, and scholars have identified structural and cultural drivers of this polarity. Missing from these theories is a consideration of the emotional dynamics at play in environmentally relevant interactions between liberals and conservatives. Based on analyses of in-depth int...
Article
The transition to a more sustainable grid is likely to involve residential customers who make decisions about whether or not to install solar panels on their property. It will require that utilities engage customers in order to effectively manage the demand and supply of electricity. This means that relationships between customers and utilities are...
Article
Renewable energy may have smaller environmental benefits than expected because reductions in carbon emissions may be offset by increased consumption. We conduct an online vignette experiment with United States (US) residents to examine how people evaluate household electricity use. We show that participants negatively evaluate households that use a...
Article
This study examines how people make moral judgments about individual efforts to reduce environmental impact. Past research suggests morality is an important driver of such efforts. But it is not known empirically whether people interpret individual-level environmental practices and impact as moral issues. Through analyses of 64 semi-structured inte...
Article
Under what conditions is ethical consumption a high-status practice? Using unique food consumption survey data on aesthetic and ethical preferences, we investigate how these orientations to food are related. Existing research on high-status food consumption points to the "foodie," who defines good taste through aesthetic standards. And emergent evi...
Article
Full-text available
Recent evidence of an association between status and eco-friendly practices invites examination of environmental concern across social class. Analyzing interview data from 64 socioeconomically diverse residents of Washington state, we observe variation in orientation to the environment across social class. High-status participants embody an eco-hab...
Article
Full-text available
On top of working longer hours in paid employment and spending more time actively caring for children, parents, especially mothers, also feel pressured to safeguard the health of their children and the planet through their food consumption choices. Surprisingly, little evidence identifies whether the health value and environmental impact of food co...
Article
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Do green behaviors earn social status among liberals and conservatives? Although evidence shows that high-status consumers incorporate ecological concerns into their consumption choices, politically polarized views on environmentalism in the United States complicate the relationship between green behaviors and status. A vignette experiment shows th...
Article
Full-text available
Across the political spectrum, people favour renewable energy. For political liberals, this support has been attributed to concern for the environment; in contrast, the bases of conservatives’ support are less clear. Derived from interviews with a diverse sample of households in Washington State, USA, and a vignette experiment with a representative...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter problematizes the dominant viewpoint of sustainable consumption as a personal and voluntary act by arguing that such a conceptualization makes individuals appear responsible for complex, systemic issues and then limits individuals to respond solely as consumers. We argue that environmental policy solutions based on this dominant concep...
Article
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Research has identified a gender gap in household-level environmental protection, with women engaging more frequently than men. However, this gender gap is rarely seen as problematic; environmental sociologists have referred to household-level pro-environmental behaviour (PEB) as ‘low-hanging fruit’ in the pursuit of ecological sustainability – act...
Article
New technologies are creating possibilities for making household energy consumption visible. With these technologies come opportunities for harnessing the power of social norms (viewed here as rules that are socially enforced) to affect energy consumption. But will those norms favor reductions in energy use? To answer this question, we conduct thre...
Article
Full-text available
Non-confrontational engagement practices like ethical consumption are a popular form of everyday politics. Existing research into these practices offers positive evaluations (highlighting the value of everyday engagement in public life) and critical perspectives (questioning whether myriad small acts can address structural barriers to equity and su...
Chapter
Full-text available
Purpose: Research has established a connection between industrially-produced food and negative health outcomes. Scholars have also shown a significant link between poor food environments and health. This paper explores the experiences of university extension program agents in order to initiate greater dialogue about the role of extension in lesseni...
Article
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We extend prior research on “ethical” food consumption by examining how motivations can vary across demographic groups and across kinds of ethical foods simultaneously. Based on a survey of food shoppers in Toronto, we find that parents with children under the age of 5 are most likely to report intention to purchase organic foods and to be primaril...
Article
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Campus common reading programs are intended to stimulate critical thinking and dialogue across disciplines yet scarce evidence exists to evaluate the success of such programs. We assess the extent to which engagement in an environmentally-themed common reading program is related to (1) concern for waste-related issues, (2) beliefs that addressing w...
Article
Full-text available
Scholars remain divided on the possibilities (and limitations) of conceptualizing social change through a consumer-focused, “shopping for change,” lens. Drawing from framing theory and the concept of the democratic imagination, we use a case study of “eat-local” food activism to contribute to this debate. We ask two questions: first, how do activis...
Article
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Maintaining sustainability discourses in the face of evidence to the contrary is a topic of considerable interest in sociology. We approach this topic with a focus on the beef industry in Alberta, Canada. By studying the discourses of cow and calf producers this article addresses the following questions: (1) What are the discourses that producers d...
Chapter
Full-text available
Environmental politics focuses on the place of the environment in public discourse and action. Thus it encompasses a broader range of activities than environmental justice but does include environmental justice within its auspices. Literature on gender and environmental politics can be simplified by accounting for three lines of inquiry: the role o...
Article
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Overcoming the barriers to ecological sustainability requires extensive civic engagement. In many respects, citizens have met this challenge yet, despite widespread environmental concern and activism, the structures that threaten the biosphere persist. Using data from a qualitative, comparative case study of local food movements in three Canadian c...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental sociology is premised on the inseparability of humans and nature and involves an analytical focus on the place of power and social inequality in shaping human/nonhuman interactions. Our purpose here is to conduct a broad overview of the place of gender in environmental sociology. We review gender-relevant scholarship within environmen...
Chapter
A fairly robust consensus among scholars and practitioners pursuing sustainability holds that social change will depend upon collective - not individual - actions. Social practice theories offer a promising lens through which to understand the interstitial space between the individual and the collective. To date, social practice theories in sustain...
Book
Putting Sustainability into Practice offers a robust and interdisciplinary understanding of contemporary consumption routines that challenges conventional approaches to social change premised on behavioral economics and social psychology. Empirical research is featured from eight different countries, using both qualitative and quantitative data to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The proposed presentation builds on the established limitations of the citizen-consumer hybrid through a study of key actors in the sustainable food movement. While others have focused on how consumers are mobilized to purchase ethical products as an expression of citizenship or social agency, we examine the motivations of social movement actors an...
Article
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“Downshifting,” reducing work hours, thereby income, to increase leisure time, offers a possible individual-level solution to the stress many experience from long working hours and work intensification. Recently, some have argued that an increase in leisure time with a reduction in income might also foster pro-environmental lifestyles as has been d...
Article
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Three parallel lines of inquiry regarding individuals' support for the environment have developed within the environmental social sciences. These include individuals' concern for the environment, research on private sphere pro-environmental behaviour (PEB), i.e. household actions seeking to improve the environment (e.g. buying better light bulbs),...
Article
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This article presents survey data from households in Alberta, Canada, examining the relationship between income and carbon footprint. Using multivariate statistics to scrutinize the role of income, the data demonstrate substantial disproportionality in the composition and size of household carbon footprints. Results show that household energy consu...
Article
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This paper applies urban and environmental sociological theory to survey data on self-reported sustainable consumption practices, using a matched sample of central city and suburban residents in Edmonton, Alberta. We use cluster analysis to create an ordinal typology of four types of consumers, conduct an analysis of variance to characterize the re...
Article
Full-text available
Farmers’ markets, often structured as non-profit or cooperative organizations, play a prominent role in emerging alternative food networks of western Canada. The contribution of these social economy organizations to network development may relate, in part, to the process of regional clustering. In this study we explore the nature and significance o...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological citizenship is a normative theory that has been used to explain how some individuals lead sustainable lives within the constraints of late capitalism. Bringing citizenship into the discussion of sustainability is generally viewed as valuable, though some perceive the individualistic orientation of ecological citizenship to be a weakness....
Article
Classifying communities as forest dependent based on economic indicators implies that residents of these communities share a utilitarian view of forest management whereby resource extraction and economic benefits are the primary focus. In this study, we test this hypothesis by examining the relationship between forest dependency, value orientation,...
Article
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We introduce the term "relational activism" to call attention to the way that relationship-building work contributes to conventional activism and constitutes activism in and of itself. In so doing, we revisit Mohai's paradox-a long-standing "ironic contrast" that notes that women's environmental concern is not reflected in greater contributions to...
Article
Full-text available
Worldwide, studies have shown increases in environmental values and beliefs over the past four decades. However, in few cases have researchers observed parallel increases in environmentally-supportive behaviour (ESB). In fact, the gap between environmental values and ESB is of growing concern for both academics and practitioners. We explored 'the e...
Article
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Abstract Distinctions between rural and urban populations are well documented in environmental sociology literature. Rural and urban places may exert different influences on participation in environmentally supportive behavior (ESB) as well as on other forms of environmental concern (EC). The influence of these distinct geographies may be due to pr...
Article
Full-text available
Despite concern over the environmental impacts of consumerism, there is a little theoretical coherence into the topic. We present a review of theoretical work from the social sciences to move towards a sociology of consumerism. Few sociological theories address sustainability so we draw from a broad array of literature from Baudrillard (1998) [Baud...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Forests are the backbone of the New Brunswick economy. Until now the pulp and paper industry and the wood products industry have been the focus of government policy and discussion about our forest economy. However, there are many other forms of economic activity which rely on our forests, including tourism, maple syrup production, and hunting and f...

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Projects (6)