Emily Grman

Emily Grman
Eastern Michigan University | EMU · Department of Biology

PhD

About

37
Publications
10,346
Reads
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1,342
Citations
Introduction
Emily Grman currently works at the Department of Biology, Eastern Michigan University. Emily does research in plant community ecology, using restored prairies as a model system for understanding interactions among species and limits on community assembly.
Additional affiliations
August 2011 - present
Michigan State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2011 - August 2014
Michigan State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Plants are subject to tradeoffs among growth strategies such that adaptations for optimal growth in one condition can preclude optimal growth in another. Thus, we predicted that a plant species that responds positively to one global change treatment would be less likely than average to respond positively to another treatment, particularly for pairs...
Article
Restoration in this era of climate change comes with a new challenge: anticipating how best to restore populations to persist under future climate conditions. Specifically, it remains unknown whether locally‐adapted or warm‐adapted seeds best promote native plant community restoration in the warmer conditions predicted in the future and whether loc...
Article
Full-text available
Global change is impacting plant community composition, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are unclear. Using a dataset of 58 global change experiments, we tested the five fundamental mechanisms of community change: changes in evenness and richness, reordering, species gains and losses. We found 71% of communities were impacted by global c...
Article
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Ecological restoration is notoriously unpredictable because similar actions can result in different outcomes. Outcomes can also differ for species and functional components of communities depending on how restoration actions and abiotic conditions alter community assembly trajectories. Quantifying variation in community trajectories across restorat...
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The species pool concept has advanced our understanding for how biodiversity is coupled at local and regional scales. However, it remains unclear how species pool size-the number of species available to disperse to a site-influences community assembly across spatial scales. We provide one of the first studies that assesses diversity across scales a...
Article
Full-text available
Forbs comprise most of the plant diversity in North American tallgrass prairie and provide vital ecosystem services, but their abundance in prairie restorations is highly variable. Restoration practitioners typically sow C4 grasses in high abundances because they are inexpensive, provide fuel for prescribed fires, can dominate reference sites, and...
Article
Restoring the diversity of plant species found in remnant communities is a challenge for restoration practitioners, in part because many reintroduced plant species fail to establish in restored sites. Legumes establish particularly poorly, perhaps because they depend on two guilds of soil microbial mutualists, rhizobial bacteria and arbuscular myco...
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Full-text available
Global change drivers (GCDs) are expected to alter community structure and consequently, the services that ecosystems provide. Yet, few experimental investigations have examined effects of GCDs on plant community structure across multiple ecosystem types, and those that do exist present conflicting patterns. In an unprecedented global synthesis of...
Article
There is strong evidence for a positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning at local spatial scales. However, it remains poorly understood how different aspects of biodiversity relate to multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality) across heterogeneous landscapes, and how the magnitude of biodiversity, dominant species,...
Article
Mutually beneficial resource exchange is foundational to global biogeochemical cycles and plant and animal nutrition. However, there is inherent potential conflict in mutualisms, as each organism benefits more when the exchange ratio (‘price’) minimizes its own costs and maximizes its benefits. Understanding the bargaining power that each partner h...
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The loss of biodiversity at local and larger scales has potentially dramatic effects on ecosystem functioning. Many studies have shown that ecosystem functioning depends on biodiversity, but the role of beta diversity, spatial variation in community composition, is less clear than that of local-scale (alpha) diversity. To test the hypothesis that b...
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Temporal stability of ecosystem functioning increases the predictability and reliability of ecosystem services, and understanding the drivers of stability across spatial scales is important for land management and policy decisions. We used species-level abundance data from 62 plant communities across five continents to assess mechanisms of temporal...
Article
Nutritional mutualisms are ancient, widespread, and profoundly influential in biological communities and ecosystems. Although much is known about these interactions, comprehensive answers to fundamental questions, such as how resource availability and structured interactions influence mutualism persistence, are still lacking. Mathematical modelling...
Article
Recovering biological diversity and ecosystem functioning are primary objectives of ecological restoration, yet these outcomes are often unpredictable. Assessments based on functional traits may help with interpreting variability in both community composition and ecosystem functioning because of their mechanistic and generalizable nature. This prom...
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Full-text available
A major challenge in global change ecology is to predict the trajectory and magnitude of community change in response to global change drivers (GCDs). Here, we present a new framework that not only increases the predictive power of individual studies, but also allows for synthesis across GCD studies and ecosystems. First, we suggest that by quantif...
Article
Community assembly filters, which in theory determine the suite of species that arrive at and establish in a community, have tremendous conceptual relevance to restoration. However, the concept has remained largely theoretical, with a paucity of empirical tests. As such, the applicability of assembly filters theory to ecological restoration remains...
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Full-text available
Agricultural land use commonly leaves a persistent signature on the ecosystems that develop after agricultural abandonment. This agricultural legacy limits the biodiversity supported by post-agricultural habitats compared to remnant habitats that have never been used for agriculture. In particular, beta diversity (variation in community composition...
Article
By assisting the recovery of disturbed or destroyed ecosystems, ecological restoration plays an important role in biodiversity conservation. Moreover, restoration has been heralded as an ''acid test'' of ecological understanding, by affording the ability to study community assembly, ecosystem function, and human influence over ecosystems across lar...
Article
Understanding variation in community composition across space, or beta diversity, is of longstanding interest in ecology, yet the determinants of beta diversity remain poorly known. In part, this results from a lack of manipulative tests of hypothesized drivers. The size of species pools is one putative driver, but few studies have provided a direc...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The outcomes of ecological restoration are notoriously unpredictable, but we have no general predictive understanding of this contingency. Management decisions can have strong effects on restoration outcomes, but in other cases they are overwhelmed by site characteristics (e.g., soil conditions), landscape context (e.g...
Article
The outcomes of ecological restoration are notoriously unpredictable, but we have no general predictive understanding of this contingency. Management decisions can have strong effects on restoration outcomes, but in other cases may be overwhelmed by site characteristics (e.g. soil conditions), landscape context (e.g. abundance of similar habitat) o...
Article
AimsA key idea in plant community ecology is that the identity of the limiting resource shifts from soil nutrients in low productivity sites to light in high productivity sites. This idea, and its implications for plant community structure, has been tested many times in artificial productivity gradients (fertilization studies), but whether it appli...
Article
Ecological stoichiometry can explain major trends in how interactions among species change across fertility gradients, but important questions remain. For example, stoichiometry predicts that fertilization should cause plants to reduce carbon allocation to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and, consequently, reduce fungal abundance, but responses in the...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Mutualisms can affect the distribution and abundance of species. Notably, the fitness effects of mutualism are often context-dependent: mutualists increase performance in some environmental contexts and reduce performance in others. Furthermore, species vary in their response to mutualists in at least two ways: 1) allo...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Beta diversity, differences in community composition across space, is a fundamental property of ecological systems. The processes establishing and maintaining beta diversity, however, remain a puzzle for basic and applied ecologists. Beta diversity can be driven by stochastic processes such as dispersal that lead to un...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Experimental work in grasslands has illustrated how greater plant species diversity can support greater function, such as primary productivity and invasion resistance; however, the extent to which these findings translate to ecological restoration efforts is relatively unknown. Restored systems support substantial envi...
Article
Full-text available
By definition, mutualisms involve the exchange of goods or services between partners. It has been shown that mutualism can grade into parasitism, but even when exchange is mutually beneficial, a conflict of interest remains because each partner benefits from reaping more benefits at a lower cost. Metaphorically, the partners negotiate the condition...
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Full-text available
Theory suggests that cheaters threaten the persistence of mutualisms, but that sanctions to prevent cheating can stabilize mutualisms. In the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, reports of parasitism suggest that reductions in plant carbon allocation are not universally effective. I asked whether plant species differences in mycorrhizal responsivenes...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The availability of limiting resources varies across habitats, because of both natural gradients and anthropogenic inputs. This variation in resource availability affects plant productivity, allocation strategies, fitness, and interactions with other organisms. For example, plant uptake of phosphorus frequently depends...
Article
Ecology Letters (2010) 13: 1400–1410 Stability in ecosystem function is an important but poorly understood phenomenon. Anthropogenic perturbations alter communities, but how they change stability and the strength of stabilizing mechanisms is not clear. We examined temporal stability (invariability) in aboveground productivity in replicated 18-year...
Article
Understanding priority effects, in which one species in a habitat decreases the success of later species, may be essential for restoring native communities. Priority effects can operate in two ways: size-asymmetric competition and creation of “soil legacies,” effects on soil that may last long after the competitive effect. We examined how these two...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Mutualisms are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of their functioning is hindered by the complexities introduced by their context dependence. Many terrestrial plants engage in a symbiosis with mycorrhizal fungi, but the degree of benefit gained by symbionts is variable. Plant and fungal gain from trade appears to depend...
Article
1. Plants use a range of sophisticated strategies to protect themselves against herbivores and pathogens, such as the production of jasmonates, a group of plant hormones that prime the plant’s defense system upon attack. However, defense-related mechanisms, such as the jasmonate response, play a more diverse role than previously appreciated. Jasmon...
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Full-text available
Low levels of fruit production are thought to threaten the persistence of Asclepias meadii (Mead's milkweed) populations. We evaluated four hypotheses explaining the low fruit production in one population (herbivory, pollen limitation, resource shortages and rainfall) by collecting within-year data on stem size, levels of fruit initiation and matur...
Article
Low levels of fruit production are thought to threaten the persistence of Asclepias meadii (Mead's milkweed) populations. We evaluated four hypotheses explaining the low fruit production in one population (herbivory, pollen limitation, resource shortages and rainfall) by collecting within-year data on stem size, levels of fruit initiation and matur...

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